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Which clippings match 'Birth' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 MAY 2014

Michel Foucault's Biopolitics

"we can call 'biopolitics' the specific strategies and contestations over problematizations of collective human vitality, morbidity and mortality. Over the forms of knowledge, regimes of authority, and practices of intervention that are desirable, legitimate and efficacious."

(Paul Rabinow and Nikolas Rose, 12 October 2003)

TAGS

2003biopolitical power relationsbiopolitics • biopower • bipolar technology • birthbody • collective existence • conceptual clarification • genomic medicine • longevity • mechanisms of life • Michel Foucault • modes of subjectification • morbidity • mortality • political struggle • populationrace • regulatory controls • reproductionsexualitysociology • strategies for the governing of life • technologies of power • the character of living human beings • truth discourses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 OCTOBER 2012

Birth and Death in The Romanian Folk Belief

"Romanian traditions and customs, which accompany the important events of life have been and still are under investigation by researchers in various fields, including folklorists and ethnographers.

The ethnographic research is mostly characterised by concrete information, collected in the studied areas, by a variety of facts, by attempts to describe the accomplishment of each custom and, in some cases by attempts to find out their role and significance in social life. Among these works the first to mention are the volumes published by Simion Florea Marin in Bucuresti in 1892 and dedicated to the three great cycles of customs connected with birth, wedding and death."

(Joanna Kretsu–Kantsyr)

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TAGS

1892 • birthbirth and death • Bucuresti • customsdeath • Dragaica • ethnographersethnographic research • folk belief • folklore • folklorists • pagan traditionRomania • Romanian customs • Romanian tradition • Simion Florea Marin • social life • summer solstice • wedding • winter solstice

CONTRIBUTOR

Valeria Marti
18 JUNE 2011

Victor Turner: Liminality

"Liminal people or 'threshold people' are neither here nor there; they are betwixt and between the positions assigned and arrayed by law, custom, convention, and ceremonial. As such, their ambiguous and indeterminate attributes are expressed by a rich variety of symbols in the many societies that ritualize social and cultural transitions. Thus, liminality is frequently likened to death, to being in the womb, to invisibility, to darkness, to bisexuality, to the wilderness, and to an eclipse of the sun or moon."

(Victor Turner)

Turner, Victor (1974). "Dramas, Fields, and Metaphors: Symbolic Action in Human Society". Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press [http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100135290].

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TAGS

agregation • ambiguity • ambiguous occasions • Arnold van Gennep • betwixt and between • birthbisexuality • ceremonial devices • ceremonies • communitas • comparative approach • comparative sociologist • continuous sequence • death • emotional importance • families and societies • funeral rituals • in utero • incorporationindividual and society • life-crises • liminal people • liminal stageliminalityliminality rites • marge • marginal status • marriage • mortuary • neither here nor there • normative stages • obligations • passage • phase • puberty • reaggregation • reintegration • responsibilities • rites • rites of passage • rites of separation • ritual process • sequential stages • social customs • social identity • social meaning • social role • social situation • social status • social transitions • socially betwixt and between • status passage • status transitions • threshold people • transformative ritual practices • transitiontransitional ritestransitions • tripartite pattern • tripartite structure • uncertain futureVictor Turner

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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