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Which clippings match 'Pioneering Animator' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 DECEMBER 2015

1926 Silhouettenfilm von Lotte Reiniger, Musik von Wolfgang Zeller

"Mit dem Silhouettenfilm 'Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed' schuf Lotte Reiniger (1899 – 1981) den ersten langen Animationsfilm der Filmgeschichte und entwickelte Technik sowie Ästhetik dieses Genres bereits in den 20er Jahren zur künstlerischen Perfektion. Ihr Stil knüpft an die chinesischen Schattenspiele an, die sie durch die Möglichkeiten des Films erweiterte. Zu diesem an sich stummen Film (es gibt einige Zwischentitel) komponierte Wolfgang Zeller eine Tonspur für Orchester."

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1926black and white • cardboard cut-outs • colour silhouette film • colour tintcraft technique • cutout animation • Die Geschichte des Prinzen Achmed (1926) • feature-length animated film • German cinema • German film director • Lotte Reiniger • monochrome • paper animationpaper craftpaper cut designpapercuttingpioneering animatorshadow playshadow puppetsilent cinemasilhouette • silhouette animation • silhouette film • silhouette films • The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926) • traditional craft technique • Wolfgang Zeller • women in animation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 AUGUST 2015

Pioneering instructional animators Bruce and Katharine Cornwell

"Bruce and Katharine Cornwell are primarily known for a series of remarkable animated films on the subject of geometry. Created on the Tektronics 4051 Graphics Terminal, they are brilliant short films, tracing geometric shapes to intriguing music, including the memorable 'Bach meets Third Steam Jazz' musical score in 'Congruent Triangles.' Their work, distributed by the defunct International Film Bureau, is now out of distribution."

(Geoff Alexander, 2015, Academic Film Archive)

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19762D animationabstract graphic animation • Academic Film Archive • basic geometric shapes • Bruce Cornwell • computer animationdigital pioneersearly computer-eraEuclidean geometrygeometric shapesgeometryinstructional materials • International Film Bureau (IFB) • Katharine Cornwell • mathematics educationmotion graphicspioneering animatorpolygon • Tektronix 4051 Graphics Terminal • triangle • visual representations of mathematical concepts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MARCH 2014

The Barbican Centre Presents: Joy Batchelor - Life in Animation

An event and films curated by Vivian Halas and guests: 4pm / ScreenTalk with Vivian Halas, Clare Kitson, Jez Stewart and Brian Sibley, Thursday 13 April 2014. Barbican Centre, Silk Street London, EC2Y 8DS

"Joy Batchelor was one of the pioneering creative and commercial forces in UK animation with her output of witty public service short films after the second world war, as well as the BAFTA nominated Animal Farm adapted from the novel by George Orwell.

This event, celebrating the centenary of her birth, looks at Joy's life as both a professional co–running a creative studio and her role as a mother."

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2014Animal Farm (1954)animationBarbican Centre • Birds Eye View Film Festival • book illustration • Brian Sibley • British animation • Clare Kitson • creative studio • George OrwellHalas and Batchelorillustrator • Jez Stewart • Joy BatchelorLondonpioneering animatorpioneering womenpublic information film • public service short films • traditional animationUKUK animationVivien Halaswomen designerswomen illustratorswomen in animationwomen in designwomen in film

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2012

Te Wei's Feelings of Mountains and Waters

"Shan shui qing ('Feelings of Mountains and Waters') finished production in 1988. This water/ink animation was Te Wei's [特伟] fourth and final major production, and is in many ways fittingly so. 'Feelings of Mountains and Waters' is a masterpiece. The film runs slightly under twenty minutes, moving the viewer through an emotional journey cleanly articulated by deep and vivid imagery, wrought with incredible artistic purity.

The film's subject is a young girl, whom ferrying an aging man across a river, generously nurses him to better health after witnessing him collapse on the shoreline. In 'Feelings of Mountains and Waters,' Te Wei uses earthy watercolors and craggy puffs of ink to maneuver hillsides, paths, valleys, and waterfalls. He uses the high–values where the ink ends and the paper begins not as an artifact of the landscape, but as the landscape itself. The watercolor paintings move and flourish, the water and ink are the animation; and the rosy–cheeked girl, through muted conversation with the humble old man, learns to play a plucked, string instrument under the quiet and almost sentient backdrop of the mountainous milieu.

Te Wei served as general director for 'Feelings of Mountains and Waters,' and retired after its completion, at the time well into his seventies. The film deservedly earned multiple awards, including high honors from international film festivals in Montreal and Shanghai. In 1995, the global professional animation community ASIFA honored Te Wei with a Lifetime Achievement Award."

(Aaron H. Bynum, 12th February 2010, p.3, Animation Insider)

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19882D animation • aging man • ancient instrument • animationblack and whitecreative practicecultural heritage • earthy watercolours • emotional journey • Feelings of Mountains and Waters • female protagonistfish • folk narrative • folk story • folk tale • folkloregirlhand-drawninklandscapemark makingmonkeymonotonemusical instrumentmusiciannational cultural identities • national cultural identity • national heritageold manpaintingpaperPeoples Republic of Chinapioneering animatorriver • Shan shui qing • Shanghai Animation Studios • Shanghai Film Studios • Te Wei • traditional painting • traditional techniquesvisual designvivid imagerywater and inkwater/ink animationwatercolour painting • whistle • young girl • zheng (instrument)

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
24 JANUARY 2010

John Whitney: Motion Graphics Pioneer

"John Whitney, Sr. was one of the earliest and most influential of the computer animation pioneers. He came at the problem from the background of film, working with his brother James Whitney on a series of experimental films in the 1940s and 1950s. His work in this area gave him the opportunity to collaborate with well known Hollywood filmmakers, including Saul Bass.

His earliest computer work used analog devices for controlling images and cameras. After the second world war, Whitney purchased surplus military equipment and modified it to be used in his art making. One such device was an analog mechanism used in military anti–aircraft controllers, the M–5 (and later the M–7). Whitney and his brother converted this device of war into an animation controller, and used it together with a mounted camera as an animation stand. ...

After establishing his company Motion Graphics, Inc in 1960, he used his analog devices for the opening to the Hitchcock movie Vertigo in 1961. His company was focused on producing titles for film and television, and was also used in graphics for commercials. But Whitney was far more interested in the use of the technology as an art form, and began a series of collaborations in art making that has lasted for years. Many of these early collaborations revolved around the advancement of the vector graphics device as a viable tool for making art. Whitney received funding from IBM to take a look at the use of IBM equipment in the design of motion. He worked with IBM programmers in the development of a language for extending the computer to the control of graphics devices. This resulted in one of his most famous animations, Permutations in 1968."

(Wayne Carlson)

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19581968abstract graphic animationAlfred Hitchcockanalogue computeranimation • animation controller • Bernard Herrmanncompositioncomputer animationcustom typeface • digital harmony • IBMinnovatorJames WhitneyJohn Whitney • M-5 • M-7 • mechanical computermotion graphics • Motion Graphics Incorporated • Permutations • pioneerpioneering animatorSan FranciscoSaul Basstitle sequence • UPA studios • Vertigo (1958)visualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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