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Which clippings match 'Advertising Billboards' keyword pg.1 of 2
01 SEPTEMBER 2017

Truth In Advertising: Guerrilla Art in Santa Cruz 1980-1985

"The photographs in this exhibit are of actual altered billboards that appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz, California from 1980 to 1985. The photographs have been adjusted for brightness, contrast, and parallax, but no content changes were made.

The billboards were made over by a clandestine network of midnight billboard editors operating under the name of Truth In Advertising, or TIA for short.

This exhibit of their historic work was first presented in 2007 at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History. The exhibit is made up of 12 billboards presented in the order in which they appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz. The sequence also tells the story of Truth in Advertising, and documents publicity and commentary."

(Bob Stayton)

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TAGS

1980sactivismadadvertising billboardsadvertising hijackingappropriation practicesbillboardbillboard bandit • Bob Stayton • critical cultural hijacking • culture jammingdetournement publicitaire • guerrilla art • guerrilla tacticsmedia hijacking • media reinterpretation • re-purposerecombinatory practiceridicule • Santa Cruz • transformative works • Truth in Advertising (TIA) • William Board (pseudonym)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2015

Google trials DoubleClick enabled virtual out-of-home advertising

"Google has begun testing extending its DoubleClick ad technology beyond desktop computers and mobile phones to billboards.

The company is trialing a method for premium billboard ads to bought programmatically — using DoubleClick's automated processes, rather than having to manually place an order with an outdoor advertising company upfront — for the first time. ...

The idea is that passers-by will see the most relevant ads for the time of day and location they are in. If the passing audience isn't the right one to show an ad to, then the technology opts not to serve an ad.

Google's trial began earlier this month in London and will run until November. The ads are being served to premium digital screens in transport, roadside locations, and city centers across the UK. Google has bought the advertising placements upfront and is using DoubleClick to decide which ads for which of its brands are most appropriate to serve at particular locations and to determine the best time of day to display them."

(Lara O'Reilly, 30 October 2015, Business Insider)

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2015 • ad tech • ad technologyadvertising billboardsadvertising screensambient intelligenceautomated messagesbillboard • Business Insider Inc • Co:Collective (agency) • context awarenessdigital advertisingdigital advertising screensdigital billboardsdigital out-of-homedigital screensdigital signs • Essence (agency) • Euston Road • Google DoubleClick • Google Media Lab • GrandVisual • hypermediacyJCDecaux • London Waterloo Station • Ocean Outdoor • Old Street roundabout • OMD UK (agency) • OOH advertising • OOH media • OpenLoop • out of home advertising • out-of-home (OOH)outdoor advertising • Outdoor Plus • passer-bypervasive advertising • programmatic billboards • programmatic out-of-home advertisingproof of concept • R/GA (agency) • real-time advertising • Rubicon Project • Silicon Roundabout • Talon (agency) • targeted advertising • Tim Collier • TubeMogul • ubiquitous advertising • Vauxhall roundabout • virtual outdoor advertising • Xaxis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 NOVEMBER 2014

They Live: sunglasses reveal subliminal capitalist messages

"John Carpenter's They Live (1988), one of the neglected masterpieces of the Hollywood Left, is a true lesson in critique of ideology. It is the story of John Nada–Spanish for 'nothing'! –, a homeless laborer who finds work on a Los Angeles construction site, but has no place to stay. One of the workers, Frank Armitage, takes him to spend the night at a local shantytown. While being shown around that night, he notices some odd behavior at a small church across the street. Investigating it the next day, he accidentally stumbles on several more boxes hidden in a secret compartment in a wall, full of sunglasses. When he later puts on a pair of the glasses for the first time, he notices that a publicity billboard now simply displays the word 'OBEY,' while another billboard urges the viewer to 'MARRY AND REPRODUCE.' He also sees that paper money bears the words 'THIS IS YOUR GOD.' Additionally he soon discovers that many people are actually aliens who, when they realize he can see them for what they are, the police suddenly arrive. Nada escapes and returns to the construction site to talk over what he has discovered with Armitage, who is initially uninterested in his story. The two fight as Nada attempts to convince and then force him to put on the sunglasses. When he does, Armitage joins Nada and they get in contact with the group from the church, organizing resistance. At the group's meeting they learn that the alien's primary method of control is a signal being sent out on television, which is why the general public cannot see the aliens for what they are. In the final battle, after destroying the broadcasting antenna, Nada is mortally wounded; as his last dying act, he gives the aliens the finger. With the signal now missing, people are startled to find the aliens in their midst."

(Slavoj Zizek)

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1988advertising billboardsalien invasion • alien occupation • broadcasting antenna • buy and obey • Cable 54 • capitalist ideologychurchconsumerism • contact lenses • control • critique of capitalism • critique of ideologycult filmcultural critique • drifter • dystopia • homeless labourer • Hooverville • ideology • John Carpenter • Keith David • kick ass and chew bubble gumLos Angelesmass mediamedia consumermedia consumption • Meg Foster • nameless drifter • passive consumptionpervasive advertisingpost-ideological society • prophetic • Roddy Piper • ruling class • satirical film • science fiction • shantytown • Slavoj Zizek • subliminal advertising • subliminal messages • sunglassesThe Perverts Guide to Ideology (2012)They Live (1988)threat • underground organisation • unmasked • watch television

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2014

Mail order fashion company La Redoute explores Adaptive Advertising

"the brand created a series of billboards displaying items that relate to the current temperature. For example, when it gets cold the model on the billboard is covered in warmer attire. When hot, the model loses some layers for more appropriate garments. How do the billboards work? Each display is fitted with rain and temperature sensors that track the changes in weather instantly. These indicators are the brains that drive the product visuals consumers see."

(Rory Kaluza, 19 September 2013, Branding Magazine)

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2013ad technology • adaptive advertising • advertising billboardsambient intelligenceBBDOcontext awarenessdigital advertisingdigital billboardsdigital out-of-home • fashion retailer • La Redoute • live weather billboard • mail order • out-of-home (OOH)outdoor advertisingParispervasive advertising • precipitation • programmatic out-of-home advertising • rain sensor • real-time weather changestemperature analysisweather • weather conditions • weather sensor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2012

Minority Report-style advertising billboards to target consumers

"Researchers at IBM have revealed they are working on technology which will lead to consumers being shown tailor made adverts that reflect their personal interests.

Digital advertising screens are already appearing in train stations, on bus stops and on the sides of buildings, but currently they only show generic adverts for a handful of products.

The new advertising hoardings will behave like those in the film Minority Report, starring Tom Cruise, in which Cruise's character is confronted with digital signs that call out his name as he walks through a futuristic shopping mall.

'John Anderton. You could use a Guinness right about now,' one billboard announces as he walks past.

IBM claims that its technology will help prevent consumers from being subjected to a barrage of irritating advertising because they will only be shown adverts for products that are relevant to them."

(Richard Gray, 01 August 2010, Science Correspondent for The Telegraph)

Fig.1 Uploaded by lucazambrelli on 9 Mar 2008

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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