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Which clippings match 'Walter Ruttmann' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 JUNE 2015

What is the Cut-Up Method?

"The writer Ken Hollings examines how an artistic device called the 'cut-up' has been employed by artists and satirists to create new meanings from pre-existing recorded words.

Today's digital age has allowed multi-media satirists like Cassetteboy to mock politicians and TV celebrities online by re-editing - or cutting up - their broadcast words. But the roots of this technique go back to the early days of the avant-garde. The intention has always been to amuse, to surprise, and to question.

The founder of the Dadaist movement, the poet Tristan Tzara, proposed in 1920 that a poem could be created simply by pulling random words cut from a newspaper out of a hat. And it was this idea of the random juxtaposition of text, of creating new meanings from pre-existing material, that so appealed to the painter Brion Gysin in the late 1950s when he and his friend, the American writer William S Burroughs, began applying the technique not just to text but to other media too - including words recorded on tape."

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1920absurdist humourAlan Sugar • Armando Iannucci • artistic device • avant-garde experimental technique • BBC Radio 1 • BBC Radio 4Brion Gysin • broadcast news • Cassetteboy • Chris Morris • Coldcut (duo) • collaged togethercut-upcut-up techniqueDada movement • Dan Shepherd • Doug KahnGeorge W Bush • Julie Andrews • juxtaposition • Ken Hollings • Kevin Foakes (aka DJ Food) • Lenka Clayton • Matt Black • mockingNegativland • Pierre Schaeffer • pulled out of the hat • random juxtaposition • random wordsre-editre-purposeremix cultureRonald Reagan • sound-poetry • State of the Union • tape cut-up • The Apprentice (UK TV series)The Sound of Music (1965)Tristan TzaraVicki BennettWalter RuttmannWilliam Burroughs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 DECEMBER 2013

A history of colour organs and visual music

"'The early history of this art was driven by an interest in color. In the eighteenth century, a Jesuit priest, Louis Bertrand Castel, invented the first color organ. Others, including D.D. Jameson, Bainbridge Bishop, and A. Wallace Rimington, created color organs through the next century [2]."

(Maura McDonnell, 2002)

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1730 • 1742 • 18th century • Alexander Scriabin • Alexander Wallace Rimington • amplitudeanalogue correspondence • Arnaldo Ginna • Audiovisual Environment Suite (AVES) • Bainbridge Bishop • Bruno Corra • clavecin oculaire • Clavilux • colourcolour and music • colour and sound • colour light • colour music • colour organ • colour tone • coloured light • coloured notes • compositioncorrelative analogue • D.D. Jameson • experimental instrument • experimental musical instrumentFernand Leger • Fred Callopy • Georg Telemann • GesamtkunstwerkGolan LevinHans Richter • harpsichord • Harry SmithhueinventionJames WhitneyJohn Whitneykeyboard • Lejf Marcussen • Len Lye • Leopold Survage • light organ • Louis Bertrand Castel • Luigi RussoloMan RayMarcel Duchamp • Mary Ellen Bute • Maura McDonnell • music historymusical instrumentNorman McLaren • Ocular Harpsichord • organOskar Fischinger • Paul Friedlander • piano style keyboard • pitch to hue • projected light • Prometheus (mythology) • rhythmiclight • Roy De Maistre • soundStan Brakhagesynaesthesia • synesthesia • Thomas Wilfred • timbre • tone colour • Viking Eggelingvisual music • Wallace Rimington • Walter Ruttmann • Wurlitzer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2009

Expanding the narrow definitions of documentary animation

"The term 'animated documentary' can still upset a truth–seeking purist. But over the last few years our understanding of what a documentary is has expanded from the narrow direct cinema/cinema vérité definition of the 1970s and the 1980s. A more inclusive definition with room for both classic documentaries like the European city symphonies of the 1920s and the personal film essays of the 1990s and the 2000s is now gaining support.

There was a close connection between animation and documentary filmmaking in Europe in the 1920s (Walter Ruttman, Hans Richter, Dziga Vertov) and in the UK in the 1930s (John Grierson, Len Lye, Norman McLaren). This close connection continued at the National Film Board of Canada after World War II and through to this day. Even Hollywood's Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences accepted the animated documentary as documentary proper by giving the Oscar to McLaren (Neighbours, 1952) and Saul Bass (Why Man Creates, 1968). The direct cinema/cinema vérité movements and the total dominance of TV documentaries closely based on journalism have dominated the documentary tradition since the 1960s. But postmodernist thinking combined with more individual/personal artistic filmmaking have brought the artistic elements of the European documentaries of the 1920s and 1930s back. And this scene has also opened up for the modern animated documentary.

At the NFB the filmmakers never stopped making animated documentaries, and a similar tradition has been kept alive in the Scandinavian countries of Denmark, Sweden and Norway. I believe a major reason for this is the social democratic political thinking that lies behind both the ideology of the NFB and the film politics in Scandinavia. The film industry deserves state funding because the films play a vital role in our democracy."

(Gunnar Strøm, March 2005, 'How Swede It Is ...and Danish and Norwegian: Scandinavian documentary animation', p.13, fpsmagazine.com)

Fig.1 Monika Forsberg & Susie Sparrow 2006, We Believe in Happy Endings

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 DECEMBER 2004

Berlin: Sinfonie einer Großstadt / Symphony of a Great City

"Dabei versucht Ruttmann, die seiner Generation eigene Großstadterfahrung mit spezifisch filmischen Mitteln adäquat auszudrücken. Zu diesem Zweck hat er die Filmaufnahmen als Ausgangspunkt für eine Montage genommen, deren Rhythmus hypnotisiert, dem Zuschauer ein Geschwindigkeitserlebnis vermittelt und die einen neuen Sinn erzeugt, der über die Gegenständlichkeit der Filmaufnahmen hinausgeht.

'Während der langen Jahre meiner Bewegungsgestaltung aus abstrakten Mitteln ließ mich die Sehnsucht nicht los, aus lebendigem Material zu bauen, aus den milionenfachen, tatsächlich vorhandenen Bewegungsenergien des Großstadtorganismus eine Film–Sinfonie zu schaffen', schreibt Ruttmann."

(Katrin Lemke)

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1927avant-garde cinemaBerlin • Berlin Symphony of a Great City • cinemacity symphonyDeutschlandfilmGermanGerman cinemaGermanyinfluential worksmechanical rhythmmotifmotionmovementpatternrepetitionrhythmseminalsequence • Sinfonie einer Großstadt • Symphony • Symphony of a Great City • Walter Ruttmann
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