Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Aboriginal' keyword pg.1 of 3
30 JULY 2014

Australian anti-discrimination campaign: Stop. Think. Respect.

"beyondblue's new national anti–discrimination campaign highlights the impact of racism on the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Research shows that subtle or 'casual' racism can be just as harmful as more overt forms. Imagine being judged in a job interview by the colour of your skin, rather than the strength of your CV. How would you feel if you were watched in a shop or treated differently on public transport?

Why should anyone be made to feel like crap, just for being who they are?

Stop. Think. Respect. encourages everyone in Australia to check their behaviour. Stop the discrimination, think about how your comments or actions could cause real distress and harm, and respect people who are different from you."

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TAGS

2014Aboriginalad campaign • anti-discrimination • anxiety • attempted suicide • attitudesAustraliaawareness campaignawareness raisingbehaviour • Beyond Blue • casual discriminationcasual racismdepressiondiscriminationeveryday racism • footie • harmful effectsIndigenous Australiansmental healthmental wellbeing • passive racism • perceived threat • prejudiceracial discriminationracial inequality • racial injustice • racismrespectskin coloursubstance abuse • substance use • subtle racism • Torres Strait Islanderwellbeing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2013

The 1907 Exposition Coloniale de Vincennes

"Souvent oubliée, l'exposition coloniale de 1907 dont l'ambition se limitait aux colonies françaises a été organisé au bois de Vincennes, en lisière de la commune de Nogent–sur–Marne. Le lieu même de cette petite exposition organisée par la Société Française de Colonisation, est resté intact, et l'on peut encore se promener à travers quelques pavillons de 1907, même si certain ont subi les outrages irrémédiables du temps et de la tempête de 1998.

Cinq villages sont reconstitués (Indochine, Madagascar, Congo, Soudan, Tunisie, Maroc) selon les grandes possession de l'empire français. Les indigénes de ces colonies avaient été amené pour parfaire l'animation. Il s'agissait de locaux, à qui on avait proposé un contrat et un salaire pour venir en France habiter ces villages sensés montrer comment l'on vit là–bas. Une fois sur place il est indéniables que ces personnes faisaient le spectacle à l'encontre de ce qu'aujourd'hui on appellerait la dignité humaine. Le visiteur pouvait voir de ses propres yeux, ses indigénes dont on parlait aux actualités cinématographiques. Rites religieux, danses, artisanat, la limite de l'exibition était sans aucun doute dépassée."

(Sylvain Ageorges)

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190719th centuryAboriginalalien and strange • bois de Vincennes • Cambodia • Colonial Exhibition (1907) • colonial historycolonial mentalitycolonial powercultural differencecultural hegemonycultural imperialismcultural narrativesculture and customs • degrading • Democratic Republic of Congodignity • ethnographic zoos • ethnological expositions • European imperialism • exotic populations • fictional settingFranceFrench empire • French Indochina • human dignity • human zoos • Jardin dAgronomie Tropicale • Laosliving history museumMadagascar • Morocco • native peoplenatives • negro villages • Nogent-sur-Marne • non-European peoples • patronisingpavilion • primitive state • racismreconstruction • scientific racism • social Darwinism • Societe Francaise de Colonisation • Sudan • Sylvain Ageorges • theme parkTunisia • unilinealism • Vietnam

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2012

Australian Aboriginal On-line Television: short-form original content

"Australian Aboriginal On–line Television aims to be one of the world's best video sites. We specialize in short–form original content – from new, emerging talents. We're committed to delivering an exceptional entertainment experience and we do so by engaging and empowering our audience every step of the way.

Everyone can Watch Videos on Australian Aboriginal On–line Television. By uploading your video people will be able to see first–hand accounts of current events, find videos about their hobbies and interests, and discover the quirky and unusual. As more people capture special moments on video, Australian Aboriginal On–line Television is empowering them to become the broadcasters of tomorrow.

Australian Aboriginal On–line Television is not only a video sharing website but also has social network features, you can make friends, and send them videos and private messages. Australian Aboriginal On–line Television also has built in rating system and comment system so that people can discuss on their interested videos, not only comment but also, people can rate Comments."

(Australian Aboriginal On–line Television)

Fig.1 "Australia's Natural Heritage", Oski Pictures Australia (http://www.oskipictures.com/).

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17882010 • AATV • AboriginalAborigineancestorsAustraliaAustralian Aboriginal On-line TelevisionAustralian Aboriginebroadcastercomment systemcultural identity • current events • emerging talent • empowering • engaging and empowering our audienceentertainment experience • first-hand account • historyIndigenousIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous languagemediamoviesonline televisionoriginal contentquirky and unusualrating systemshort-form • short-form original content • social network • special moments • Stolen Generation • televisionTorres Strait IslanderTVvideo sharing • video site • videos

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MARCH 2012

Babakiueria: the colonialisation of European Australians by Indigenous Australians

"Presenter Duranga Manika (Michelle Torres) describes her fascination with white people and their customs and explains how she spent six months living with a 'typical white family' (Tony Barry, Cecily Polson, Kelan Angel, Margeurita Haynes). She also asks members of the general public for their opinions on white people and speaks to the Minister for White Affairs (Bob Maza).

[Geoffrey] Atherden's script takes stereotypes of Australian culture and, with tongue–in–cheek humour, views them as though for the first time, as mysterious, alien and strange. Here, the barbecue is singled out. Elsewhere Manika describes the football match as ritualised violence and betting at the TAB as a religion, while a police commissioner calls the Anzac Day March a ritual where white people 'honour their warrior ancestors' but wonders why it can't be done at home.

Presenter Duranga Manika's ethnographic study of white people simplifies, patronises and mystifies her subjects. Every mundane detail of this one family's everyday life is invested with serious cultural significance. Bob Maza's Minister for White Affairs compresses a history of government treatment of Indigenous Australians into one self–satisfied, authoritative figure. It is interesting that while these characters treat 'white' culture with such fascination, they treat 'black' culture as such a given that the audience does not find out much about it."

(Kate Matthews, Australian Screen)

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17881986Aboriginalalien and strangeANZAC • ANZAC Day • ASO • audio and visual heritageaudiovisual archiveAustraliaAustralian cultureAustralian Screen • authoritative figure • Babakiueria • barbecue • Barbecue area • BBQ • belongingblack culture • Bob Maz • Bob Maza • Cecily Polson • colonial misrecognition • colonisationcultural anthropologycultural critiquecultural perspectivecultural significanceculture and customsethicsethnographic studyethnography • Euro-Australians • European Australians • fictitious land • First Australiansflagfootball • for their own good • gambling • Geoffrey Atherden • government treatment • humourIndigenousIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous peopleinvasion • Kelan Angel • Margeurita Haynes • Michelle Torres • Minister for White Affairs • mockumentary • National Film and Sound Archivenative peopleNFSApatronisingpostcolonial • powerboat • racial inequality • racial profiling • religionritual • ritualised violence • role-reversal • satiresatiricalsettlementstereotype • TAB • tongue-in-cheek • Tony Barry • typical white family • untamed land • white culture • white people • white settlement

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2010

NativeWeb: fostering communication among Indigenous peoples

"NativeWeb is a project of many people. Our vision touches ancient teachings and modern technology. Our purpose: to provide a cyber–place for Earth's indigenous peoples.

As access to the Web grows and indigenous peoples reach out through cyber–space, NativeWeb will grow also. Through NativeWeb, indigenous people (and peoples) become visible to each other and themselves and organize actions in a multitude of local, national, and international institutions. The shape of indigenous social action changes as wider audiences are created and especially as the means of creating audiences become the means by which audiences become actors. From Chiapas to Nunavut and from Samiland to Thailand, indigenous communities widen, coalesce, and interact as they work, communicate, and organize via the Internet.

Indigenous Peoples have much in common amidst great diversity: spiritual practices celebrating inter–relatedness of all Life on Earth; and historical suffering at the hands of industrialized nations and corporate entities. NativeWeb is concerned with all this: indigenous literature and art, legal and economic issues, land claims and new ventures in self–determination.

Our purpose is not to 'preserve,' in museum fashion, some vestige of the past, but to foster communication among peoples engaged in the present and looking toward a sustainable future for those yet unborn."

(NativeWeb, Inc.)

Fig.1 Sami people from Finland (http://www.flickr.com/photos/helga_ni/)

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AboriginalAotearoa New Zealand • Austronesian • Chiapas • engagementFinlandidentityIndigenousIndigenous people • industrialised nations • Maori • NativeWeb • Nunavut • PacificPacific Rimpastpostcolonialpreservation • Sami people • Samiland • self-determinationsocial actionspiritual practicessustainable futureThailand

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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