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Which clippings match 'RMIT' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 DECEMBER 2011

Zoontechnica Journal redirective design futures

"A variety of designers and researchers address issues of concern to contemporary design thinking in this first issue1 of Zoontechnica (not counting the pre–issue, now archived). All grapple with questions about how design can, in more substantial ways, contribute to sustaining those things that need to be sustained, like social justice, equity, diversity and critical thinking. ...

It is now widely acknowledged that design has played a central role in creating and sustaining cultures of consumption that continue to use up resources, burn fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases that lead to climate change, and so on. What's less recognized is that these are not just biophysical problems to be solved by technologies, but that the unsustainable is often that which is closest to us, the everyday world in which we feel comfortable, secure and accommodated (herein lies a dilemma for user–centred design–what to do about user needs/desires that clearly contribute to unsustainability?). Being–in–the–world is being with designed things, structures and spaces that design our modes of being. Sometimes this is obvious, 'the designed' declaring itself as such,but mostly, the designed nature of our worlds is invisible to us, and when everything is working as it should, we feel at ease. We shouldn't. So much of what functions seamlessly now, saves time, delivers convenience, gives pleasure, etc– is actually taking futures away."

(Anne–Marie Willis, November 2011)

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TAGS

academic journal • Anne-Marie Willis • anthropometrics • being-in-the-world • biophysical • Brunel University • Chris McGinley • climate changeconsumptionconveniencecritical thinking • cultures of consumption • Daniel Sobol • designdesign futuresdesign thinkingdesigned spacesdesigned things • Donald Welch • Emmanuel Levinas • environmental change • equity • ethicseverydayfossil fuelgreenhouse gases • Griffith University • human factorshuman-centred design • Jason Robertson • Jennifer Loy • Marc Steen • modes of being • Nada Filipovic • our world • QCA Griffith University • Queensland College of Art • redesign • redirective • reflexive practice • RMIT • Robert Macredie • social changesocial justicesustainability • the designed • time savingTony Fry • unsustainability • unsustainableuser needsUser-Centred Design (UCD) • Zoontechnica

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MAY 2009

The Australian Technology Network (new universities, Post-1992 universities, land-grant colleges)

"The Australian Technology Network (ATN) comprises Curtin University of Technology, University of South Australia, RMIT University, University of Technology, Sydney and Queensland University of Technology. All were established as universities between 1987 and 1992. This group of universities has a common technology heritage, a common research focus on solving real world problems (73 per cent of all research income sourced from industry), and a willingness to learn from each other at all levels. The members of the group have worked together for more than 20 years."
(Department of Education, Science and Training, Commonwealth of Australia)

[The Australian Technology Network Universities in Australia are equivalent to the new universities (mainly ex–polytechnics and technical colleges) in Aotearoa/New Zealand, Hong Kong and Singapore, and Post–1992 or 'Plate Glass' universities in the United Kingdom and land–grant colleges in North America.]

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TAGS

19871992Aotearoa New Zealand • ATN • Australia • Australian Technology Network • Curtin University of Technology • Hong Kong • institute of technology • land-grant colleges • new universitiesnew universitypolytechnic • post-1992 • Post-1992 universities • Queensland University of TechnologyQUTRMITRMIT Universitysandstone universitiesSingaporetechnical collegetechnologyUK • UniSA • university • University of South Australia • University of Technology Sydney • UTS

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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