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03 MARCH 2014

Motion + Design Centre: an animated history of motion graphics

"Motion Plus Design est un projet qui a pour but de créer un centre d'exposition dédié au Motion Design à Paris. Ce projet vise dans un premier temps à définir le motion design au grand public, le but final étant de réussir à créer un centre physique dédié au motion design à Paris."

(Mattias Peresini, 18 Juin 2012, Mattrunks)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2013

The Pillars of the Earth: hand-painted stop motion animation style

"We made this animation in BrosFx Studio. It is an opening to the TV series 'THE PILLARS OF THE EARTH', an adaptation of a book by Ken Follett. The series director is Sergio Mimica Gezzan, who cooperated, among others, with Steven Spielberg. Our goal was to create an animation which would render the colourful and vivid world of medieval England. The next step was to create a distinctive style that the audience would remember. After many tests, we opted for a hand painted stop motion, which suited perfectly the spectacle."

(Michał Socha)

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TAGS

12th century2010 • Acme Filmworks • animation • BrosFX • castleChannel 4colourfuldistinctive visual stylehand-painted stop motion animationhand-painted style • illustration techniques • illustrative style • Ken Follett • medieval • medieval England • Michal Socha • mini-seriesmotion graphics • Muse Entertainment • period drama • Scott Free Production • Sergio Mimica-Gezzan • Steven Spielbergstop motion animationstop-frame animation • Tandem Communications • The Pillars of the Earth • title designtitle sequencetitle sequence designTVTV seriesvisual designvisual stylevivid imagery

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 OCTOBER 2012

A Fistful of Dollars title sequence

"One of the most iconic title sequences ever made. A Fistful of Dollars (original Italian title: Per un Pugno di Dollari) was the first spaghetti western to gain widespread international recognition. After the film's initial release in Italy, it took three years until the film was released in the US, but Sergio Leone's revolutionary take on the western would ultimately change the genre altogether, as well as catapult the careers of Leone, main actor Clint Eastwood, and composer Ennio Morricone, whose enigmatic score still resonates today.

A Fistful of Dollars (1964) was the first film in Sergio Leone's 'Dollars' trilogy that also includes For A Few Dollars More (1965) and The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966). The opening title sequences for these three films were made by Italian graphic designer Iginio Lardani. Unlike Leone, Eastwood, and Morricone, Lardani did not win a one–way ticket to stardom. The designer who created one of the most iconic film title title sequences of the 20th Century, and whose bold, graphic, pop art–inspired main titles continue to inspire designers, animators and filmmakers today (see for instance Paul Donnellon's opening titles for Smokin' Aces), remains relatively unknown outside the Italian film industry.

Iginio Lardani passed away in 1986, but his son Alberto Lardani told me this anecdote: 'Sergio Leone's reaction when he first saw the title sequence for 'Per un Pugno di Dollari' was of great gratitude. Not only for its extraordinary iconic impact but also because it was designed for free.'"

(Remco Vlaanderen, 14 July 2011, WatchTheTitles)

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TAGS

19642D animationA Fistful of Dollarsanimated creditsClint EastwoodEnnio Morriconefilm genrefilm title artfilm title design • Iginio Lardani • Italianmain titlesmovie titleopening title sequence • Per un Pugno di Dollari • sequenceSergio Leonespaghetti western • title art • title design • title designer • title sequencetitles • trilogy • WatchTheTitles • western film genre

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2011

Animated décollage technique used to produce 'Capitu' title sequence

"Capitu is a Brazilian TV mini–series adaptation of 19th–century novelist Machado de Assis' work, Dom Casmurro. The story centres on an ageing man looking back on his life in an attempt to discover whether his best friend is the true father of his son, who he has raised with his wife, Capitu. De Assis' novel is now considered one of Brazil's most important Modernist texts and, in order to convey its radicalism, motion graphics studio Lobo looked to the Dadaist movement as inspiration for the TV show's opening titles and interstitials. The team referenced what several avant–garde artists called 'décollage', a process where–rather than building up an image through layering–cutting and tearing instead reveals layers of buried images."

(Patrick Burgoyne, 28 April 2009)

Fig.1 'Capitu' title sequence.

Fig.2 The making of 'Capitu' title sequence.

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TAGS

19th century2008avant-gardeBrazil • Capitu • Carlos Bela • collagecut-up • cutting and tearing • Dada • decollage • design • Dom Casmurro • Globo Networks • illustrative styleinterstitialsjuxtapositionlayerlayering • Lobo • Machado de Assis • Mateus de Paula Santos • mini-series • Modernist texts • motion graphicspaper • Roger Marmo • title designtitle sequenceTVvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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