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Which clippings match 'Hans Richter' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 SEPTEMBER 2014

MoMA: Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s

Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s, March 19–July 28, 2008, The Yoshiko and Akio Morita Media Gallery, second floor, The Museum of Modern Art.

"This exhibition considers the transformation of the art object from static image to light projection within two distinct artistic lineages: the unconventional optical techniques and social analyses of the 1920s Neue Optik, or 'New Vision,' generation of artists, among them László Moholy–Nagy, Hans Richter, and Marcel Duchamp; and the situational aesthetics advanced by Gordon Matta–Clark, Robert Smithson, and Anthony McCall in the 1970s. Drawing attention to the conditions and complexities of perception–both within the framework of institutional display and in other surroundings–these artists have redefined the social potential of visual agency."

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1920s1970safterimage • Anthony McCall • art object • artistic lineage • durationEl Lissitzkyexhibitionexperimental cinema • fluid light projection • geometric abstraction • Gordon Matta-Clark • Hans Richter • Hollis Frampton • immaterialityintangible creationsJames Turrell • Klaus Biesenbach • Laszlo Moholy-Nagylight and space • light and space movement • light artlight projectionMarcel Duchamp • Maria Nordman • materialisationmotion artsmovementmovement-image • moving through space • Museum of Modern Art • Neue Optik (New Vision) • non-narrative • objecthood • objecthood and space • optical techniques • Paul Sharits • peripatetic • Richard Serra • Robert Irving (artist) • Robert Irwin • Robert Smithson • Roxana Marcoci • solid light films • static image • structural film • VernissageTV (VTV) • Viking Eggeling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 DECEMBER 2013

A history of colour organs and visual music

"'The early history of this art was driven by an interest in color. In the eighteenth century, a Jesuit priest, Louis Bertrand Castel, invented the first color organ. Others, including D.D. Jameson, Bainbridge Bishop, and A. Wallace Rimington, created color organs through the next century [2]."

(Maura McDonnell, 2002)

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1730 • 1742 • 18th century • Alexander Scriabin • Alexander Wallace Rimington • amplitudeanalogue correspondence • Arnaldo Ginna • Audiovisual Environment Suite (AVES) • Bainbridge Bishop • Bruno Corra • clavecin oculaire • Clavilux • colourcolour and music • colour and sound • colour light • colour music • colour organ • colour tone • coloured light • coloured notes • compositioncorrelative analogue • D.D. Jameson • experimental instrument • experimental musical instrumentFernand Leger • Fred Callopy • Georg Telemann • GesamtkunstwerkGolan LevinHans Richter • harpsichord • Harry SmithhueinventionJames WhitneyJohn Whitneykeyboard • Lejf Marcussen • Len Lye • Leopold Survage • light organ • Louis Bertrand Castel • Luigi RussoloMan RayMarcel Duchamp • Mary Ellen Bute • Maura McDonnell • music historymusical instrumentNorman McLaren • Ocular Harpsichord • organOskar Fischinger • Paul Friedlander • piano style keyboard • pitch to hue • projected light • Prometheus (mythology) • rhythmiclight • Roy De Maistre • soundStan Brakhagesynaesthesia • synesthesia • Thomas Wilfred • timbre • tone colour • Viking Eggelingvisual music • Wallace Rimington • Walter Ruttmann • Wurlitzer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MARCH 2010

Hans Richter: Rhytmus 21

"Richter and Eggeling were among the first creators of abstract film. Although the films themselves were produced in Berlin, the works were grounded in Zurich Dada's experiments with abstraction. The artists originally experimented with painting on scrolls before turning to animated film. Eggeling directly transposed his scroll drawings to film to create "cinematic drawings"; Richter more fully exploited the new medium, abandoning his drawings altogether and filming paper rectangles, squares, and lines of various sizes and shades suggestive of movement and depth."

(The Museum of Modern Art)

Fig. 1 Germany, 1921. 3 min. Film in the permanent collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2010 Hans Richter

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2009

Expanding the narrow definitions of documentary animation

"The term 'animated documentary' can still upset a truth–seeking purist. But over the last few years our understanding of what a documentary is has expanded from the narrow direct cinema/cinema vérité definition of the 1970s and the 1980s. A more inclusive definition with room for both classic documentaries like the European city symphonies of the 1920s and the personal film essays of the 1990s and the 2000s is now gaining support.

There was a close connection between animation and documentary filmmaking in Europe in the 1920s (Walter Ruttman, Hans Richter, Dziga Vertov) and in the UK in the 1930s (John Grierson, Len Lye, Norman McLaren). This close connection continued at the National Film Board of Canada after World War II and through to this day. Even Hollywood's Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences accepted the animated documentary as documentary proper by giving the Oscar to McLaren (Neighbours, 1952) and Saul Bass (Why Man Creates, 1968). The direct cinema/cinema vérité movements and the total dominance of TV documentaries closely based on journalism have dominated the documentary tradition since the 1960s. But postmodernist thinking combined with more individual/personal artistic filmmaking have brought the artistic elements of the European documentaries of the 1920s and 1930s back. And this scene has also opened up for the modern animated documentary.

At the NFB the filmmakers never stopped making animated documentaries, and a similar tradition has been kept alive in the Scandinavian countries of Denmark, Sweden and Norway. I believe a major reason for this is the social democratic political thinking that lies behind both the ideology of the NFB and the film politics in Scandinavia. The film industry deserves state funding because the films play a vital role in our democracy."

(Gunnar Strøm, March 2005, 'How Swede It Is ...and Danish and Norwegian: Scandinavian documentary animation', p.13, fpsmagazine.com)

Fig.1 Monika Forsberg & Susie Sparrow 2006, We Believe in Happy Endings

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2008

Dreams That Money Can Buy

"Berlin–born Hans Richter – Dadaist, painter, film theorist and filmmaker – was for four decades one of the most influential members of the cinematic avant–garde. Richter assembled some of the century's liveliest artists as co–creators of Dreams That Money Can Buy, his most ambitious attempt to bring the work of the European avant–garde to a wider cinema audience. Among its admirers is film director David Lynch.

Joe, a young man down on his luck, discovers he has the power to create dreams, and sets up a business selling them to others. The 'dreams' he gives to his clients are the creations of Max Ernst, Fernand Lger, Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, Alexander Calder and Richter himself, and the result is by turns playful, hypnotic, satirical, charming and nightmarish."

Dreams That Money Can Buy is a film in seven segments namely:
"Desire" Director, Writer – Max Ernst; "The Girl with the Prefabricated Heart" Director, Writer – Fernand Léger; "Ruth, Roses and Revolvers" Director, Writer – Man Ray; "Discs" Director, Writer – Marcel Duchamp; "Ballet" Director, Writer – Alexander Calder; "Circus" Director, Writer – Alexander Calder; "Narcissus" Director, Writer – Hans Richter.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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