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27 DECEMBER 2013

Open Social Learning: I store my knowledge with my friends

Fig.1 Stephen Downes 2009 presentation "The Role of Open Educational Resources in Personal Learning", VI International Seminar on Open Social Learning of the UOC UNESCO Chair in e–Learning.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 SEPTEMBER 2013

World's first ethical smartphone to launch in UK

"Fairphone, which is described by its makers as 'the world's first ethical smartphone' is set to launch in London. The first prototype of the Fairphone, which has been developed by a team in The Netherlands, will be shown at the London Design Festival next week. Fairphone's makers say they use conflict–free materials and aim to ensure that every worker in the phone's supply chain receives a fair wage."

(Angus Montgomery, 10 Sep 2013, Design Week)

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TAGS

2013 • Action Aid • AmsterdamAndroid OSapplied research • Bas van Abel • black box system • Closing the Loop (programme) • conflict-free • conflict-free materials • Democratic Republic of Congodesign responsibilityDesign Weekethical consumption • fair wage • fairer principles • fairness • Fairphone • Fairtrade • Jelly Bean OS • London Design Festival • made • mobile phoneNetherlands • non-profit organisation • Peoples Republic of Chinaphoneprototype • raise awareness • recyclingresearch projectresponsible designreuse • Schrijf-Schrijf • smartphonesocial enterprise • social values • South Kivu • speculative designsupply chainvaluesWaag Society • wages • workers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 OCTOBER 2009

Mainstreaming sustainable fashion

"4,5 Katharine Hamnett in a video interview explained how in the late 1980s she had been prompted to check, to make sure the company were not doing any harm. That meant looking at the entire supply chain to make sure that every phase was as good as possible. They had to apply very stringent standards from the very beginning. It started with the farmers given the millions involved in cotton agriculture who are exposed to pesticides, on a daily basis. It lead to focus on organic cotton but regrettably not using silk and considering all the packaging, dyes and printing inks. She has used certification, traceability and accountability, right the way through the supply chain but found taking complete control of this complex supply chain was the only way to enable this. She believed that the most effective to target were the CEO's, of clothing companies and fashion retailers. Mainstreaming sustainable fashion was happening because large retailers were realising that it was increasingly what consumers wanted: products that don't do damage to the environment, or that use child or sweated labour. Retailers ignored this at their peril. Sustainable clothing had to be sophisticated, glamorous and the bottom line was always economic. Sustainable clothing did not have to be more expensive. It could and should be affordable. She though that the ETI labour code should be compulsory and governments should act to have country of origin labelling for fibres."

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TAGS

art for housewives • art of recyclingbelongingblogbricolagechangecommoditycommunityconsumptioncraft • crochet • Cynthia Korzekwa • design intelligencedesign responsibility • domestic arts • dyeecologyembroideryemotive manipulationengagementenvironmentenvironmentalethicsfashion • fiber arts • folk arthomemadejewelleryjunk art • Katharine Hamnett • knittingmaking art with recycled materialsobsolescenceorganicpaperpesticideproductionprotest • reconstructed fashion • recyclerecyclingremakereusesocial changesocietysustainabilitytextile artstransformation • trashion • urban crafts • waste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 OCTOBER 2008

Remix culture: an empirical analysis of creative reuse and the licensing of digital media in online communities

"We explore the nature and impact of creative reuse in the production of digital media by analysing the output of an innovative online music sharing community, ccMixter. The dataset is of great significance because this is one of only a handful of online communities which do not only allow for the sharing of user–generated content, but also track the evolution of content after it has been published online and encourage reuse of the content for the production of new works. All content on ccMixter is legally uploaded, copyrighted, and licensed under Creative Commons. Much has been written about the birth of a new 'remix culture' on the Internet and how collaborative Web 2.0 technology has led to an explosion of user–generated content. But very little is known about the process of developing digital media in an open and collaborative fashion, the incentives of participating authors, and the outcomes of their actions. Based on our earlier studies of Creative Commons licensing and the analysis of this unique online community we hope to shed more light on the structure and dynamics of such activities by providing some of the first visualisations ever of large–scale remixing activity and presenting our preliminary findings."

(Clint Mark Lumantao Gono, Ankit Guglani, Mike Linksvayer, Victor Stone, Warren Chik, and Giri Kumar Tayi, Singapore)

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TAGS

authorshipccMixterCreative Commonsdigital mediamash-up • music sharing • online communitiesownership • Participatory Media Lab • re-purposeremixremix culturereuseuser-generatedWeb 2.0 • working paper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2005

Learning Objects: Independent Elements Organised Through Instructional Models

"Wiley's definition of learning objects [can be defined] as "any digital resource that can be reused to support learning". The idea behind learning objects is clearly grounded in the object–oriented paradigm: independent pieces of instruction that may be reused in multiple learning contexts and that fulfil the principles of encapsulation, abstraction and inheritance. Therefore, they have been historically described as Lego pieces, because as Legos do, learning objects can be assembled into lager instructional structures and reused for building other structures. But there is a substantial difference, learning objects are not at all combinable to any other learning object. It is very likely that assembling learning objects without any instructional model will hardly be educationally useful."

(Baltasar Fernandez–Manjon and Pilar Sancho, Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

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TAGS

Baltasar Fernandez-ManjonDavid Wiley • instructional model • learning objectsLEGOobject-oriented design • OO • pedagogyPilar Sanchoreuse
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