Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Urban Sprawl' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 NOVEMBER 2014

Edmund Burke on the sublime

"Some things that move us are beautiful, others are sublime. But the sublime moves us more profoundly than the beautiful. See how Edmund Burke tied the experience of the sublime to the possibility of pain and how the idea went on to influence the artistic Romanticism movement. Voiced by Harry Shearer. Scripted by Nigel Warburton."

1
2

3

4

TAGS

18th centuryaesthetic experienceaesthetic spectacleAge of Enlightenment • apprehension • aristocratic political norms • aristocratic social norms • artistic movementauthenticityawebeautifulChinoiserie • Counter-Enlightenment • Edmund Burke • emotion • European phenomenon • exhilarating experienceexoticexperience of the sublimefolk artfrightening • Harry Shearer • heroic individualism • historical inevitability • historiography • history of ideashorror • imagination to envision and to escape • individual imagination • industrial revolution • intense emotion • intuitionmedieval art • medievalism • musical impromptu • nationalism • natural epistemology of human activities • natural inevitability • natural sciencesnatureNigel Warburtonpicturesque • possibility of pain • representation of ideas • Rococo • romantic era • romantic notion of the artist • romantic period • romantic sublimeromanticism • scientific rationalisation of nature • spontaneity • Sturm und Drang • sublime • sublimity of untamed nature • terror • unfamiliar • urban sprawlvisual artsvisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JANUARY 2013

Metro-land: romanticising the mundane

Metro–Land, the 1973 BBC documentary was Sir John Betjeman's "gift to romanticise the mundane: in this case a tube ride from Baker Street to Amersham, celebrating the north–west London suburbs created by the Metropolitan Railway between 1910 and 1933. ...

'Metro–Land' was the advertising slogan developed to entice workers from cramped homes in Central London out into the rural paradise of Middlesex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. It was invented in 1915 by the Metropolitan Railway's in–house copywriter James Garland, who according to legend was ill with influenza and sprang out of bed when he thought of the term. ...

It was, of course, largely a con. The creation of Metro–Land destroyed the very thing – open countryside – which was used to advertise it. The speculative homes thrown up around the new stations bore few resemblances to the Tudor cottages depicted in the advertising materials: most were dreary semis, constructed at great haste and sold for as little as £400 each. Modern first–time buyers can only dream: that is equivalent to just £20,000 in today's money."

(Telegraph Media Group Limited, 26 Sep 2006)

1

TAGS

1920s1973 • advertising bumf • Baker Street • Benjamin Baker • Boyle Lawrence • British Empire Exhibition • Buckinghamshire • Charles Voysey • commuter belt • countryside • Edward Watkin • electrolier • Eric Sims • first-time buyers • Harrow Hill • Henry Thraile • Hertfordshireidylinterwar period • John Betjeman • Len Rawle • London Transport • meadowland • Metro-Land • Metropolitan Line • Middlesex • modernist architecture • Norman Shaw • north Londoners • nostalgic tributeopen countryside • Palace of Arts • periurbanisation • railway • rural paradise • rural social change • semi-detached housing • social history • suburban sprawl • suburbanisationThe Metropolitan Tower • Tudor cottage • tv documentaryurban sprawl • Watkins Folly • Wembley Stadium • Willesden

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MARCH 2012

New Zealanders need to start more actively dealing with urban issues

"'It is essential that New Zealanders start dealing much more actively with urban issues,' asserts Professor Harvey Perkins, recently appointed Director of Transforming Cities: Innovations for Sustainable Futures (formerly, Transforming Auckland) and Professor of Planning.

'We need to embrace the ideas of 'urban sustainability and liveability',' notions he explores in his most recent publication, Place, Identity and Everyday Life in a Globalizing World, co–authored with Professor David Thorns. This work followed a series of jointly published articles with colleagues at Lincoln University and The University of Auckland critically examining the ways in which sustainability thinking has been interpreted and incorporated in urban planning in New Zealand."

(Jenny Dixon, 16 February 2012)

1

TAGS

Aotearoa New ZealandAucklandcities • David Thorns • economic changeenvironmental changeeveryday life • globalizing world • Harvey Perkins • human geographyinterdisciplinary • interdisciplinary urban research • landscape • Lincoln University • liveabilityNew Zealandersperi-urban changeperiurbanisation • research scope • rural social changesociologysustainabilitysustainability thinking • Transforming Auckland • transforming cities • TRI • University of AucklandUniversity of Canterburyurban changeurban issuesurban planningurban researchurban sprawlurban sustainability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.