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Which clippings match 'Speculative Architecture' keyword pg.1 of 3
09 JUNE 2016

Lunar Economic Zone: a speculative architecture student project

'Lunar Economic Zone' by Zhan Wang, Part 2 Project 2014, Architectural Association London UK.

"The 2028 Mid August Day Lunar Mineral Parade is a speculative event which takes place in the newly formed Lunar Economic Zone, an administrative agglomeration of Shenzhen and the Moon, on August 15 2028. Coordinated by Zhan Wang, the event is designed to be seen by the mechanical eyes of the world's media and is an external projection of pomp and ceremony showcasing an emerging resource rich, technology advance superpower. As the media frenzy descends on the city the world is invited to the grand parade that marks the first consignment of lunar minerals touching down on earth. The parade route takes spectators along the main axis of city from the 10000 meter tall space elevator to the mega ships of the world's largest mineral port. As the world's largest rare earth producer China currently controls 90% of the mineral market. Their recent limits places upon mineral exports has artificially driven rare earth prices to unprecedented levels. Western nations are scrambling to find their own mineral deposits to counter the Chinese monopoly. Between documentary and fiction, between propaganda and news the Lunar Economic Zone plays on our fears of a localised resource economy."

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2014 • 2028 • administrative agglomeration • Architectural Association School of Architecture • architectural conjecture • August • award winners • between documentary and fiction • localised resource economy • Lunar Economic Zone • Lunar Mineral Parade • mechanical eyes • media frenzy • mineral deposits • mineral exports • minerals • monopolymoon • orange • paradePeoples Republic of China • pomp and ceremony • rare earth • rare earth producer • redRoyal Institute of British Architects • Shenzhen • space elevator • speculative architecture • speculative event • speculative projectsstudent projectyellow • Zhan Wang

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JANUARY 2015

The Codex Seraphinianus by Luigi Serafini

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1981alien beings • alien writing system • anatomies • art book • bipedal creatures • bizarre games • bizarre imagerybizarre machines • bizarre vehicles • burial customs • Codex Seraphinianus (1981) • colour illustrations • delicate appearance • dining practicesdivergent conceptsencyclopaedia • fantaencyclopedia • fantastical science • fantastical worlds • funereal customs • futuristic machines • hallucinogenic • hand-drawn illustrationillustrated book • illustrated encyclopaedia • imaginary landscapesimaginary worlds • Italian artist • ludic intervention • Luigi Serafini • mutant scienceorganism • pencil illustrations • plant life • psychedelic imagery • senseless machines • speculative architecturespeculative biology • speculative chemistry • speculative physics • strange flowers • surreal landscape • surrealist illustration • weird book • writing system

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2013

Designs for Great Architectural Landmarks that Were Never Built

"If you're writing an alternate history, these would be the buildings you'd want to include. They're the discarded designs for famous landmarks." (Vincze Miklós)

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Adolf Loos • architectural landmark • British Eiffel Tower • Bruno Tautbuildingsclassical formcultural historydesign proposalsdiscarded designsEiffel Tower • famous landmarks • fantastic architecture • Great Tower of London • Joseph Marzella • Kurz Schutz • landmarks • Lincoln Memorial • modernist architecturemonumentneoclassicism • plans • proposalsshapesketchesskyscraperspeculative architecture • Sydney Opera House • The Metropolitan Towertower • Tower Bridge (London) • Trafalgar Square (London) • Unbuilt Washington (exhibition) • Walter Gunther • Washington Monument • White House

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 APRIL 2013

Lebbeus Woods: Visionary Architect

"Lebbeus Woods, Architect", February 16 – June 02, 2013, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

"Architect Lebbeus Woods (1940–2012) dedicated his career to probing architecture's potential to transform the individual and the collective. His visionary drawings depict places of free thought, sometimes in identifiable locations destroyed by war or natural disaster, but often in future cities. Woods, who sadly passed away last year as planning for this exhibition was under way, had an enormous influence on the field of architecture over the past three decades, and yet the built structures to his name are few. The extensive drawings and models on view present an original perspective on the built environment – one that holds high regard for humanity's ability to resist, respond, and create in adverse conditions. 'Maybe I can show what could happen if we lived by a different set of rules,' he once said. SFMOMA has collected Woods's work since the mid–1990s, amassing the broadest collection of his work anywhere; the exhibition will feature these holdings, as well as a selection of loans from institutional and private collections."

(San Francisco Museum of Modern Art)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 MAY 2009

Walking City: urbanism gone ambulatory, a metropolis on the move

"In 1964, Ron Herron of Archigram proposed a Walking City: urbanism gone ambulatory, a metropolis on the move. The Walking City, strutting along on iron stilts, was imagined as an 'escape hatch from environmental conditions,' Simon Sadler writes. It was an 'architecture of rescue' – a city in shining armor – 'partly inspired by the tents and field hospitals of humanitarian relief efforts.'

Herron also had openly utopian intentions for the project. If the city didn't like where it was, for instance – if its residents found their surroundings boring, oppressive or even quasi–fascist – the whole thing could simply stand up and walk away, re–settling itself elsewhere, freed from the constraints of law and geography."
(Blend Magazine)

[Image: Ron Herron/Archigram, The Walking City]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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