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Which clippings match 'Spectacular Architecture' keyword pg.1 of 1
22 NOVEMBER 2009

Verner Panton: synthetic fantasy landscapes

"From the end of the Sixties to the mid–Seventies the chemical company Bayer rented a pleasure boat during every Cologne furniture fair and had it transformed into a temporary showroom by a well–known contemporary designer. The main aim was to promote various synthetics products in connection with home furnishings. Verner Panton was commissioned no less than twice to design this exhibition, entitled 'Visiona'. The 1970 'Visona 2' exhibition showed the Fantasy Landscape which was created in this environment. The resulting room installation consisting of vibrant colours and organic forms is one of the principal highlights of Panton's work. In terms of design history this installation is regarded as one of the major spatial designs of the second half of the twentieth century.

The creative fireworks which Panton lit with his studio within a preparation time of only a few months for 'Visiona 2' is expressed not only in the highly diversified room designs in the exhibition ship, but also in the wide range of furniture, lighting, wall coverings and textiles developed specially for this presentation. Some of these were adapted and went into series production later."

(Verner Panton)

Visiona 2, Verner Panton, Panton Design, Showroom, Ausstellung, Cologne furniture fair; Visiona 2, Biographie, Verner Panton, imm cologne, Kölner Möbelmesse; Vitra–157; VP–13–H906, Panton Design, Basel

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1960s19701970sambience • Basel • Bayer • Cologne • Cologne furniture fair • colourcolour and lightcreative practicedesignenvironmentexhibitionfantastic architecture • fantasy landscape • furniture fair • futuristic designgroovyhome furnishingsimmersive experienceinstallationinterior designinterior stylinglight and space • organic forms • Panton Design • physical environment • pleasure boat • presencespacespace age lookspace-framespatial designspectaclespectacular architecturesyntheticsynthetic fibreVerner Panton • Visiona

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 OCTOBER 2008

Nakagin Capsule Tower

"Kisho Kurokawa can't seem to catch a break these days. Just days after the Japanese architect lost his bid for the governorship of Tokyo, the Nakagin Capsule Tower, his best known building and one of the few built examples of the Metabolist movement, was given a date with the wrecking ball.

The Capsule Tower, completed in 1972, stands in the centre of Tokyo's affluent Ginza neighbourhood. The building is actually composed of two concrete towers, respectively 11 and 13 stories, each encrusted with an outer layer of prefabricated living units. It has long been appreciated by architects as a pure expression of the Metabolist movement, popular in the 1960s and 1970s, which envisioned cities formed of modular components. But in recent years residents expressed growing concern over the presence of asbestos. On April 15, the building's management association approved plans calling for the architectural icon to be razed and replaced with a new 14–story tower. A demolition is yet to be determined.

For his part, Kurokawa has pleaded to let the Capsule Tower express one of its original design qualities: flexibility. He suggested 'unplugging' each box and replacing it with an updated unit, letting the base towers –which he calls 'timeless'–remain untouched. Japan's four major architectural organisations, including the Japan Institute of Architects, support this scheme. But the building's management remained unconvinced and raised concerns regarding the towers' ability to withstand earthquakes, as well as its inefficient use of valuable land. The new building will increase floor area by 60 percent.

Following the board's decision, only Kurokawa continues to raise protest. If the Capsule Tower is destroyed as planned, it will join a growing list of losses. His Sony Tower in Osaka, completed in 1976, came down last year; Plantec Architects designed a glass–walled commercial building that will replace it."
(Yuki Solomon, Architectural Record)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MAY 2005

Antti Lovag: Le Palais Bulles

"Maison Bulle overlooks the marvellous coast of the South of France, at Théoule sur Mer, near Nice: it is a house entirely built with curved surfaces, the structure of which, totally Futuristic in conception, has never been finished. It was designed in 1968 by the Finnish architect Antti Lovag."

(Floriana De Rosa)

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1968curve • curved surfaces • fantastic architectureFinnishFrancefuturistichouselandmarks • Lovag • M-Net • Maison Bulle • Nice • Palais bulles • south of Francespectacular architecture
10 MAY 2005

Kunsthaus: communicative display skin

"As part of the commission for the conception for the thorough integration of media technology into the architecture for the Kunsthaus Graz in Austria, real:U designed the award winning "communicative display skin" BIX for the building. Using standard industrial fluorescent light tubes BIX transforms the outer biomorphic skin of the building, which is constructed out of translucent blue acrylic glass panels, into a low resolution grey scale computer display."

(realities:united)

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ArchigramarchitectureAustriabiomorphic • biomorphic skin • BIX • communicative display skin • facade projection • Fournier • Graz • Kunsthaus Graz • realities:united • Spacelab • spectacular architecturetransposing materials
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