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Which clippings match 'Winston Churchill' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 OCTOBER 2013

The enduring legacy of The World At War

"The World at War had many strengths but the key to its success as compelling history television was the formidable array of interviewees. Top military leaders, including German naval commander Karl Doenitz and the head of RAF Bomber Command, Arthur Harris, had their say alongside humble soldiers, sailors and airmen. Key politicians like wartime foreign secretary Sir Anthony Eden shed light on the war's wider arc, while ordinary citizens told of events from their perspective. Several members of Hitler's inner circle were also tracked down and interviewed, including his valet, secretary and adjutant. Death camp survivors told their terrible tales, as did a few of their shamefaced captors. More years have now passed since the making of The World at War than elapsed between 1945 and the programme's first showing in 1973. So, sadly, a programme like this can never be made again: the number of living witnesses to World War II is dwindling every day. We are fortunate that Isaacs and his team had the vision and talent to make The World at War when they did."

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TAGS

19451973Adolf Hitler • Anthony Eden • archive footage • Arthur Harris • British television • Carl Davis • Charles de Gaulle • Charles Douglas-Home • David Elstein • death camp • definitive account • documentary evidence • foreign secretary • Franklin D. RooseveltHarry Truman • Hideki Tojo • historical chronicleshistory • history television • inner circle • interviews • Jeremy Isaacs • Joseph Stalin • Karl Doenitz • Laurence Olivier • military campaign • military historymilitary leader • naval commander • Nazi • Neville Chamberlain • Noble Frankland • politician • RAF Bomber Command • sailor • social historysoldiersurvivor • Ted Childs • television documentarytelevision programmetelevision seriesThames Television • The World at War • UKTV • warwartimeWinston ChurchillwitnessWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

The talent myth: how to maximise your creative potential

"Most of us grow up being taught that talent is an inheritance, like brown hair or blue eyes. Therefore, we presume that the surest sign of talent is early, instant, effortless success, ie, being a prodigy. In fact, a well–established body of research shows that that assumption is false. Early success turns out to be a weak predictor of long–term success.

Many top performers are overlooked early on, then grow quietly into stars. This list includes Charles Darwin (considered slow and ordinary by teachers), Walt Disney (fired from an early job because he 'lacked imagination'), Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, Paul Gauguin, Thomas Edison, Leo Tolstoy, Fred Astaire, Winston Churchill, Lucille Ball, and so on. One theory, put forth by Dr Carol Dweck of Stanford University, is that the praise and attention prodigies receive leads them to instinctively protect their 'magical' status by taking fewer risks, which eventually slows their learning.

The talent hotbeds are not built on identifying talent, but on constructing it. They are not overly impressed by precociousness and do not pretend to know who will succeed. While I was visiting the US Olympic Training Centre at Colorado Springs, I asked a roomful of 50 experienced coaches if they could accurately assess a top 15–year–old's chances of winning a medal in the Games two years from then? Only one coach raised his hand.

If you have early success, do your best to ignore the praise and keep pushing yourself to the edges of your ability, where improvement happens. If you don't have early success, don't quit. Instead, treat your early efforts as experiments, not as verdicts."

(Daniel Coyle, 25 August 2012, The Independent)

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TAGS

Albert EinsteinattentionCarol DweckCharles Darwin • coach • Colorado Springs • constructing talent • creative potential • early success • effortless success • Fred Astaire • inheritance • instant success • Leo Tolstoylong-term successLouis Pasteur • Lucille Ball • magical status • Olympic Games 2012 • Olympic medal • Paul Gauguin • perseverance • praise • precociousness • prodigy • risk averserisk-takingStanford Universitytalent • talent hotbed • talent myth • Thomas Edison • top performers • US Olympic Training Centre • Walt DisneyWinston Churchill

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 NOVEMBER 2004

Sutherland's notoriously disliked painting of Winston Churchill

"Sutherland was commissioned by both Houses of Parliament to paint a full–length portrait of Churchill in 1954, for which this is a study. The finished painting was presented to Churchill. It was destroyed by his wife Clementine.

...The destruction of Sutherland's painting is one of the most notorious cases of a subject disliking their portrait. This painted sketch of Churchill's head, a study for the lost, full–length painting, suggests why. It's not simply that Sutherland's modernist tendencies irked the conservative tastes of the Sunday painter prime minister. This is a very unhappy painting. Old, grumpy, with an anger that no longer seems leavened by the humour and verbal creativity of the Churchill of legend, this is a reactionary curmudgeon surrounded by the shades of night.

The painting is black and rough, as if burnt, as if Churchill were emerging from the ruins of Europe, from a world not saved but shattered. The man himself still has a stoic authority; he might be the ancient Roman Cicero waiting to be murdered. There's a sculpted quality to his sturdy bald head that reminds you of Roman busts. There's also a sadness and sense of defeat, rather than the assertion of indomitability in the Churchill statue outside the Houses of Parliament. This is a man alone, in the real wilderness years."

(Jonathan Jones, 3 November 2001, The Guardian)

Fig.1 Winston Churchill, by Graham Vivian Sutherland, pencil and wash, circa 1954, 22 1/2 in. x 17 3/8 in. (570 mm x 440 mm), Purchased, 1990, NPG 6096, National Portrait Gallery, London.
Fig.2 Churchill in 1954 – portrait by Graham Sutherland (imperfect reproduction).

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TAGS

1874 • 1954196520th century • also-ran • Boer warBritish art • Clementine Churchill • cold warcommissionconservativedestruction • dwindling health • emerging from the ruins • extraordinary achievements • figuration • finest hour • Francis Bacon • Graham Sutherland • home secretary • Houses of Parliament • indomitability • iron curtain • legendliberal • man alone • National Portrait Gallery • neo-romantic painter • Nobel Prizenotorious • painted sketch • paintingpopularityportraitportraiturePrime Minister • reactionary curmudgeon • Roman Cicero • romanticismsadnessSecond World War • sense of defeat • shattered • Sir Winston Spencer Churchill • stoic • striking miners • sunday painter • The Guardian • The Second World War • warwar correspondent • war leader • wartime prime minister • wilderness years • Winston ChurchillWorld War II
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