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12 SEPTEMBER 2014

Automatic Art: human and machine processes that make art

Exhibition: 3 July–10 September 2014, GV Art gallery, London, 49 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London W1U 6LY.

"This exhibition presents 50 years of British art that is generated from strict procedures. The artists make their work by following rules or by writing computer programs. They range from system–based paintings and drawings to evolving computer generated images."

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2014algorithmic art • Anthony Hill • Automatic Art (exhibition) • boredomresearch • British artchance artcomputer artcomputer art practicecomputer generated artcomputerised artdesign formalismdigital art exhibitiondigital artworkdigital materialism • Dominic Boreham • Ernest Edmonds • exhibitiongenerative artgenerative designgouache • GV Art Gallery • Harold Cohen • Jeffrey Steele • John Carter • Julie Freeman • Kenneth Martin • latticemachine-made • Malcolm Hughes • Michael Kidner • Nathan Cohen • orderly patternsorganisational processPaul Brown • Paul Smith (boredomresearch) • Peter Lowe • procedural artprocess artrule-based work • Sean Clark • simple rulesStephen BellStephen Scrivener • Steve Sproates • Susan Tebby • system-based drawing • system-based painting • systems art • Terry Pope • Trevor Clarke • Vicky Isley (boredomresearch) • visual abstractionvisual art • William Latham

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MARCH 2014

Artist's spoof Ladybird book provokes wrath of Penguin

"An artist and comedian [Miriam Elia] has been told by the publisher Penguin that her new satirical art book breaches its copyright, and if she continues to sell copies it could use the courts to seize the books and have them pulped. ...

Elia's version sees them visiting an exhibition at a modern art gallery and grappling with existential questions about the nature of Tracey Emin–style conceptualist work, much of it peppered with distinctly adult imagery."

(Gareth Rubin, 2 March 2014, The Guardian)

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1950s2014adult imageryart and designart galleryart gallery experienceartistartworkballoonballoon dog • Balloon Dog (Orange) • book illustrationBritish artcanvaschildrens bookchildrens book illustrationconceptual artcontemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscopyright • crucifix • empty room • feminist parodygod • God is dead • guiltinflatable • Jane • Jeff Koons • Ladybird Book • minimalist art • Miriam Elia • modern artmother • Mummy • Nietzsche • nihilism • parodyPenguin Random Housepenis • personal sacrifice • Peter • prettyreductionism • sacrifice • satiresexTate ModernThe GuardianTracey EminUKvagina • We Go To The Gallery (book)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

The Vorticists: a short-lived 20th century avant garde art movement

"The vorticists did not have many members; nor did the movement last long, because of unfortunate timing – it formed in 1914 as Europe hurtled towards war. By 1918 there was not much appetite for dogmatic groups such as theirs.

Nevertheless, the group holds an important place in 20th–century British art history.

'They were the first abstract modernist group in Britain,' said Stephens. 'It inevitably comes out of the revolution of cubism, but then, so does everything in the 20th century.'

They were part of a maelstrom of new, aggressive art 'ism' movements, not least the one practised by the Italian futurists, who were, in Lewis's eyes, the bad guys.

Stephens said: 'Unlike the futurists, who celebrate the energy of the machine and actual war as a purging force, the vorticists were engaged in more universal ideas of identity, time and movement in a philosophical sense.'"

(Mark Brown, 13 June 2011, The Guardian)

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1914 • 20th century • abstract modernist group • aggressive art • Alvin Langdon Coburn • angular shapesart exhibitionart movementavant-garde • Blast (journal) • British art • cometism • cubismcubist and abstract art • David Bomberg • disruptive pattern • Dore Gallery • Dorothy Shakespear • Edward Wadsworth • Ezra Pound • Futurism (art movement)Hayward Gallery • Helen Saunders • ism • jazz rhythm • Lawrence Atkinson • maelstrom • Manifesto for a Modern World • movementpaintingpattern • Penguin Club • purging force • short-lived • Tate Britainthe energy of the machine • universal ideas • universal modernity • vanished works • visual abstractionvorticism • vorticists • William Robertswomen artistswomen in art and designWorld War IWyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 NOVEMBER 2004

Sutherland's notoriously disliked painting of Winston Churchill

"Sutherland was commissioned by both Houses of Parliament to paint a full–length portrait of Churchill in 1954, for which this is a study. The finished painting was presented to Churchill. It was destroyed by his wife Clementine.

...The destruction of Sutherland's painting is one of the most notorious cases of a subject disliking their portrait. This painted sketch of Churchill's head, a study for the lost, full–length painting, suggests why. It's not simply that Sutherland's modernist tendencies irked the conservative tastes of the Sunday painter prime minister. This is a very unhappy painting. Old, grumpy, with an anger that no longer seems leavened by the humour and verbal creativity of the Churchill of legend, this is a reactionary curmudgeon surrounded by the shades of night.

The painting is black and rough, as if burnt, as if Churchill were emerging from the ruins of Europe, from a world not saved but shattered. The man himself still has a stoic authority; he might be the ancient Roman Cicero waiting to be murdered. There's a sculpted quality to his sturdy bald head that reminds you of Roman busts. There's also a sadness and sense of defeat, rather than the assertion of indomitability in the Churchill statue outside the Houses of Parliament. This is a man alone, in the real wilderness years."

(Jonathan Jones, 3 November 2001, The Guardian)

Fig.1 Winston Churchill, by Graham Vivian Sutherland, pencil and wash, circa 1954, 22 1/2 in. x 17 3/8 in. (570 mm x 440 mm), Purchased, 1990, NPG 6096, National Portrait Gallery, London.
Fig.2 Churchill in 1954 – portrait by Graham Sutherland (imperfect reproduction).

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1874 • 1954196520th century • also-ran • Boer warBritish art • Clementine Churchill • cold warcommissionconservativedestruction • dwindling health • emerging from the ruins • extraordinary achievements • figuration • finest hour • Francis Bacon • Graham Sutherland • home secretary • Houses of Parliament • indomitability • iron curtain • legendliberal • man alone • National Portrait Gallery • neo-romantic painter • Nobel Prizenotorious • painted sketch • paintingpopularityportraitportraiturePrime Minister • reactionary curmudgeon • Roman Cicero • romanticismsadnessSecond World War • sense of defeat • shattered • Sir Winston Spencer Churchill • stoic • striking miners • sunday painter • The Guardian • The Second World War • warwar correspondent • war leader • wartime prime minister • wilderness years • Winston ChurchillWorld War II
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