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Which clippings match 'Boer War' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 APRIL 2006

New Zealand is not naive to the great cost of waging war

"The New Zealand war memorials of the First World War have become part of the common fabric of NZ life, like stop signs or lamp–posts. Virtually every township in the country has one, usually in the main street. Excluding the many honours boards and plaques in schools and churches throughout the country, there are well over five hundred public memorials to the soldiers of the Great War."

(Ted Harris: DiggerHistory.Info)

[New Zealand's anti–nuclear stance and recent reluctance to engage in International conflicts has its reasons. Despite it's geographical remoteness it has not escaped the impact of war. The numerous memorials erected throughout it's countryside, in it's cities and it's towns are a testament to this. There are memorials commemorating the New Zealanders that died in: The Boer War; The Great War; The Second World War; The Korean War; The Vietnam/American War as well as more recent conflicts. New Zealand is not naive to the great cost of waging war.]

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30 NOVEMBER 2004

Sutherland's notoriously disliked painting of Winston Churchill

"Sutherland was commissioned by both Houses of Parliament to paint a full–length portrait of Churchill in 1954, for which this is a study. The finished painting was presented to Churchill. It was destroyed by his wife Clementine.

...The destruction of Sutherland's painting is one of the most notorious cases of a subject disliking their portrait. This painted sketch of Churchill's head, a study for the lost, full–length painting, suggests why. It's not simply that Sutherland's modernist tendencies irked the conservative tastes of the Sunday painter prime minister. This is a very unhappy painting. Old, grumpy, with an anger that no longer seems leavened by the humour and verbal creativity of the Churchill of legend, this is a reactionary curmudgeon surrounded by the shades of night.

The painting is black and rough, as if burnt, as if Churchill were emerging from the ruins of Europe, from a world not saved but shattered. The man himself still has a stoic authority; he might be the ancient Roman Cicero waiting to be murdered. There's a sculpted quality to his sturdy bald head that reminds you of Roman busts. There's also a sadness and sense of defeat, rather than the assertion of indomitability in the Churchill statue outside the Houses of Parliament. This is a man alone, in the real wilderness years."

(Jonathan Jones, 3 November 2001, The Guardian)

Fig.1 Winston Churchill, by Graham Vivian Sutherland, pencil and wash, circa 1954, 22 1/2 in. x 17 3/8 in. (570 mm x 440 mm), Purchased, 1990, NPG 6096, National Portrait Gallery, London.
Fig.2 Churchill in 1954 – portrait by Graham Sutherland (imperfect reproduction).

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TAGS

1874 • 1954196520th century • also-ran • Boer warBritish art • Clementine Churchill • cold warcommissionconservativedestruction • dwindling health • emerging from the ruins • extraordinary achievements • figuration • finest hour • Francis Bacon • Graham Sutherland • home secretary • Houses of Parliament • indomitability • iron curtain • legendliberal • man alone • National Portrait Gallery • neo-romantic painter • Nobel Prizenotorious • painted sketch • paintingpopularityportraitportraiturePrime Minister • reactionary curmudgeon • Roman Cicero • romanticismsadnessSecond World War • sense of defeat • shattered • Sir Winston Spencer Churchill • stoic • striking miners • sunday painter • The Guardian • The Second World War • warwar correspondent • war leader • wartime prime minister • wilderness years • Winston ChurchillWorld War II
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