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19 SEPTEMBER 2014

New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual

"In the 1960s, the New York subways were a mess, sign–wise. Station names and metro lines were spelled out in a hodgepodge of sizes, shapes, and styles. The original mosaic tiles had been joined by cut stone and terracotta–all of which clashed with newer enamel signs. They were not only inconsistent in terms of style but also in where they were placed, so straphangers didn't know where to look for directions on how to get from point A to point B.

In 1970, following the merger of the IND and BMT lines, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) hired Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda, designers at the firm Unimark, to put an end to the typographic chaos. The system they devised still informs signs made today and is painstakingly outlined in a 174–page manual"

(Belinda Lanks, 15 September 2014, Businessweek)

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TAGS

1960s1970Bob Noorda • Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit • Christopher Bonanos • clashing design • communication designdestination identificationdirectional information • directions • fastidious detail • graphic communicationgraphic designer • Hamish Smyth • Helvetica • hodgepodge • inconsistencies • Independent Subway System (IND) • information design • instruction manual • International Typographic Style • Jesse Reed • Kickstarter • letter combination • manualMassimo Vignelli • merger • metro line • metro station • Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA • Michael Bierutmodern design • modernist graphics • New York City • New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual • New York subway • Niko Skourtis • official font • organisation and communicationPentagram Designrationalisation • reissue • sans-serif typefacesignagesignage designsigns • spacing • spatial orientation • standards manual • straphanger • style guidesubwaysymbol system • system signage • train station • typographic chaos • typography • Unimark • wayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2014

Blowing in the Wind: metro station screen reacts to train arrival

"On behalf of Åkestam Holst and Apotek Hjärtat we modified one of Clear Channel's Play screens on Odenplans subway platform. The mission was to capture the effect of the turbulence from the train and make it look like the models hair on the screen was caught by the breeze.

To do this we needed to build a device that could be calibrated to sense the arrival of the train and not react to passing passengers. Using an ultra sonic sensor, connected to a Raspberry Pi and a local network socket, we connected our device to the screens computer where the film could be activated by the passing trains.

Stopp managed the shooting and post production of all video material used for the customized screen at Odenplan and all other Play screens around the subway.

A simple idea, well executed, that let us use existing technology in a new way. The installation was appreciated by the head of Clear Channel and as a result Apotek Hjärtat was offered to keep it live for five additional days, as a way for them to show the opportunities their screens can offer."

(STOPP/STHLM)

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TAGS

2014adadvertising in public spacesadvertising screens • Akestam Holst • apolosophy • Apotek • Apotek Hjartat • arriving train • breeze • caught by the breeze • Clear Channel • Clear Channel Play • digital billboardsdigital screenshair • hair product • hair tousled by the wind • interactive animations • interactive subway ad • local network socket • metro station • moving train • Odenplan • Odenplan metro station • passing trains • pharmacyrail advertisingrailway advertisingrailway stationRaspberry PiStockholm • STOPP (integrated production company) • subwaySwedentrain arrivaltrain stationturbulence • ultra sonic sensor • ultrasonic sensor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 SEPTEMBER 2012

Tunnel Vision: Metro Zoetrope

"I first noticed subway tunnel wall animations in Boston, where the long gaps between stations on the MBTA Red Line provides a captive audience. The animation, composed of dozens of stills that simulated movement as the train zoomed by, was an ad. The message: visit Vermont and its great outdoors, which certainly must have resonated with more than a few claustrophobes riding the crowded rush hour rails.

Animated ads in subway tunnels are expensive, both to design and install, which helps explain why the Vermont ad's successor, a campaign for a movie 'coming to theatres' last February, was only removed recently – with no ready replacement. But the medium is a popular one, if only because it's relatively novel and rare. Examples from Budapest, Hong Kong, Kiev, L.A., Tokyo, and Washington, D.C. have been enthusiastically documented for upload to YouTube. And given that cash–strapped transit agencies have allowed almost every other subway surface to be colonized by ad space, including seats and whole exteriors of rolling stock, it was almost a logical next step.

Much of the credit for introducing these flipbook or zoetrope–like ads goes to two independent innovators: New York astrophysics student Joshua Spodek and Winnipeg animator Bradley Caruk. Spodek's ads debuted in Atlanta in 2001; his company, Sub Media, continues to produce similar ads today. In 2006, Caruk won a Manning Innovation Award for his concept, which his partner, Rob Walker, first thought up while staring at the blank walls of Paris' Metro. The company they co–founded, SideTrack Technologies, set up its first system in Kuala Lumpur and has since opened others across the United States – and beyond, to London, Rio de Janeiro, and cities in Mexico."

(Christopher Szabla, Urbanphoto, 20 November 2010)

Fig.1 Bill Brand, "Masstransiscipe" New York subway installation.
Fig.2 New ad–places in the tunnel. // Новые рекламные площади в тунеле киевского метро. Между станциями Лукьяновская и Львовская Брама
Fig.3 "Tokyo Subway Ad ", Uploaded by ivanptse on 19 Apr 2008.
Fig.4 "Target ad, on the washington D.C subway.", Uploaded by kikyobackfromthedead on 1 Sep 2006.

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TAGS

adad spaceanimated adanimation • Atlanta • between • blank wall • Boston • Bradley Caruk • Budapest • captive audience • creative advertisingflick bookflip bookHong Kong • Joshua Spodek • Kiev • Kuala Lumpur • linear zoetrope • LondonLos Angeles • masstransiscope • MBTA Red Line • Mexicomotion graphicsNew York subwayParis • Paris Metro • patternperceptual organisationrapid transit systemRio de Janeiro • Rob Walker • rolling stock • SideTrack Technologies • stop frame • Sub Media • subway • subway tunnel • Tokyotrainwall animationsWashington DCzoetrope

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2011

Tesco opens virtual store in South Korea

"Tesco Homeplus in South Korea has opened what it claims is the world's first virtual store in Seoul subway, following an initial trial in July.

Using the walls of the Seonreung subway station in downtown Seoul, Tesco has displayed more than 500 of its most popular products with barcodes which customers can scan using the Homeplus app on their smartphones, then get it delivered to their homes.

It opens on the same day that in the UK Ocado unveiled its virtual shopping wall at London's One New Change shopping centre.

In Seoul, Tesco shoppers scanning products on their way to work can get a delivery that evening if the order is placed before 11.30am. The store will be open for three months.

It follows an advert Tesco ran in South Korea in July for a virtual shopping wall, created by Cheil Worldwide. The initial launch created excitement so Tesco decided to push ahead with a full launch."

(Jennifer Creevy, 25 August, 2011, Retail Week)

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TAGS

2011barcode • Cheil Worldwide • digital storedigital storefrontdigitally enhanced shop • downtown Seoul • dwell time • home delivery • Homeplus app • Koream-commercemobile commercenon-place • One New Change (shopping centre) • QR codesQuick Response coderetail conceptsretail spaceretail storeretailing • Seonreung subway station • Seoulshoppingshopping experiencesingle-minded spacesSouth Koreastore of the futurestorefrontsubwaytechnological innovationTesco • Tesco Homeplus • UK Ocado • virtual shop • virtual shopping • virtual shopping wall • virtual store

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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