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01 FEBRUARY 2013

Claude Monet's Ultraviolet Eye

"Late in his life, Claude Monet developed cataracts. As his lenses degraded, they blocked parts of the visible spectrum, and the colors he perceived grew muddy. Monet's cataracts left him struggling to paint; he complained to friends that he felt as if he saw everything in a fog. After years of failed treatments, he agreed at age 82 to have the lens of his left eye completely removed. Light could now stream through the opening unimpeded. Monet could now see familiar colors again. And he could also see colors he had never seen before. Monet began to see--and to paint--in ultraviolet."

(Carl Zimmer, 16/04/2012)

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TAGS

1915blindness • cataracts • Claude Monetcolourcolour and light • colour frequency • colour tones • declining vision • eye surgery • eyes • foggy • French painter • impressionism • impressionistic personal world • light • light frequency • light sensitivity • meticulous observation • muddier • nuclear cataracts • optical effectpainterperception of reality • perceptual abnormalities • pigment • ultraviolet color patterns • ultraviolet colour • ultraviolet light • ultraviolet sensitivity • ultraviolet vision • UV • visible light • visible spectrum • visionvisual distortionvisual perception • visual problems • wavelength

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2012

Neurocinematics: The Neuroscience of Film

"This article describes a new method for assessing the effect of a given film on viewers' brain activity. Brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during free viewing of films, and inter–subject correlation analysis (ISC) was used to assess similarities in the spatiotemporal responses across viewers' brains during movie watching. Our results demonstrate that some films can exert considerable control over brain activity and eye movements. However, this was not the case for all types of motion picture sequences, and the level of control over viewers' brain activity differed as a function of movie content, editing, and directing style. We propose that ISC may be useful to film studies by providing a quantitative neuroscientific assessment of the impact of different styles of filmmaking on viewers' brains, and a valuable method for the film industry to better assess its products. Finally, we suggest that this method brings together two separate and largely unrelated disciplines, cognitive neuroscience and film studies, and may open the way for a new interdisciplinary field of 'neurocinematic' studies."

(Uri Hasson, Ohad Landesman et al.)

Hasson, U., Landesman, O., Knappmeyer, B., Vallines, I., Rubin, N. and Heeger, D. (2008), Neurocinematics: The neuroscience of films. Projections: The Journal for Movies and Mind 2, 1–26.

TAGS

Barbara Knappmeyer • brain • brain activity • cognitive control • cognitive film theory • cognitive neuroscience • computational neuroscience • David J. Heeger • directing style • eye movement • eye-trackingfilm editingfilm industryfilm studies • film viewing • fMRI • functional magnetic resonance imaging • Ignacio Vallines • inter-subject correlation • inter-subject correlation analysis • interdisciplinary field • ISC • motion picture sequences • movie content • movie watching • Nava Rubin • neurocinematic studies • neurocinematicsneuroscience • neuroscience and film • neuroscience of film • Ohad Landesman • perception • Projections (journal) • psychophysics • quantitative neuroscientific assessment • similarities • social neuroscience • spatiotemporal responses • styles of filmmaking • Uri Hasson • viewerviewingvisionvisual perception

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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