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18 JANUARY 2013

Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art

"Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD–Rom, DVD–Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.

Emphasizing multimedia artworks that reflect digital extensions of twentieth–century developments in cinema, video, installation, photography, and sound, holdings include extensive special collections in American and Chinese new media arts, significant online and offline holdings in internet art, and the majority of works in the international exhibition, Contact Zones: The Art of CD–Rom. A novel research archive of international significance, the collection complements the holdings in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections of illuminated manuscripts and the early modern printed book, and adds to the breadth of its important collections in human sexuality, Asian Studies, and Media, Film, and Music."

(Cornell University Library)

TAGS

2002American • American new media arts • archiveart • catalogues • CD-ROMChinese • Chinese new media arts • cinemacollection • commercialisation of mass media • Contact Zones • Cornell UniversityCornell University Library • designs • digital interfaces • DVD-ROMfilmholdingsinstallation • international art • InternetInternet artmass mediamediamonographs • multimedia artworks • musicnet artnew media artnew media artsonline and offlinephotography • Professor Rose Goldsen • research archive • resource guides • soundspecial collections • Timothy Murray • twentieth-century developments • unpublished manuscripts • video

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2012

After 35 Years, Voyager Nears Edge of Solar System

"Tucked aboard each Voyager spacecraft was a 12–inch, gold–plated, copper phonograph disc 'containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth,' according to NASA.

Below is a sampling of the 115 images and audio clips, selected by a committee chaired by Carl Sagan. The images were encoded in analog form. The audio was designed to be played at 16 2/3 rpm; a needle, cartridge and symbolic instructions for using the record were also included."

(Nell Greenfieldboyce, 12 September 2012, NPR)

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TAGS

197720th century • Ann Druyan • Carl Sagan • Cornell Universitydeep space probeeating behaviours • extraterrestrial intelligence • golden record • golden records • greetings • immortalise • interstellar probe • Jimmy Carter • Kurt Waldheim • Latin word • morse code • NASANational Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNPRPioneer 10 • Pioneer plaque • probesalutationsolar system • Sounds of Earth • spacespace exploration • space probe • Terrestrialtime capsule • Voyager 1 • Voyager 2 • Voyager Golden Record

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2012

The mathematics of Hollywood blockbuster

HOLLYWOOD'S golden age may have ended in the 1950s, but it is only recently that Tinseltown appears to have hit upon a mathematical way to capitalise on our fickle attention spans.

"Film–makers have got better and better at constructing shots so that their lengths grab our attention," says James Cutting, a psychologist at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He analysed 150 Hollywood movies and found that the more recent they were, the more closely their shot lengths tended to follow a mathematical pattern that also describes human attention spans.

In the 1990s, a team at the University of Texas, Austin, measured the attention spans of volunteers as they performed hundreds of consecutive trials. When they turned these measurements into a series of waves using a mathematical trick called a Fourier transform, the waves increased in magnitude as their frequency decreased.

(Ewen Callaway, 18 February 2010, New Scientist)

TAGS

1/f law1950s • a series of waves • algorithmalgorithmic filters • attention spans • consecutive trials • constructing shots • Cornell University • decreased frequency • filmmaker • Fourier transform • golden agegrab our attentionHollywoodHollywood movies • human attention spans • increased magnitude • James Cutting • mathematical algorithm • mathematical patternmeasurementneurocinematicsNew Scientist • our fickle attention spans • psychological analysispsychological perceptionpsychological sciencepsychology • shot lengths • Tinseltown • University of Texas

CONTRIBUTOR

Tessa Szwarnowska
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