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Which clippings match 'Reform' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 DECEMBER 2012

OCEAN2012 Transforming European Fisheries

"Since its start in 1983, the European Union's Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) has failed to prevent overfishing. Over 25 years, short–term economic interest and political expediency has landed European fisheries in deep crisis."

(European Marine Programme of the Pew Environment Group)

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TAGS

19832012abundancecall to action • CFP • Common Fisheries Policy • crisiscritical posturedecision makingdepletiondestructive practicesecology • EU Common Fisheries Policy • European Unionevidence • exhaustion • extinction • fair and equitable • fish • fish stocks • fisheries • fisheries policy • fishinghealthy oceansocean • OCEAN2012 • overfishing • policy decisions • policy making • political expediency • reformresource managementresponsibilityscientific evidence • short-term economic interests • supply • sustainabilitysustainable consumptionsustainable livelihoodswildlifewildlife reserves

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2011

Discussion Paper: a new Australian classification scheme?

"This chapter outlines factors in the media environment that necessitate reform of media classification and the development of a new National Classification Scheme. It identifies the range of trends which have been associated with media convergence, including increased access to high–speed broadband internet, digitisation, globalisation, accelerated innovation, the rise of user–created content and the changing nature of the media consumer, and the blurring of distinctions between public and private media consumption. It also draws attention to findings arising from the Convergence Review, and recent work undertaken by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (the ACMA) on 'broken concepts' in existing broadcasting and telecommunications legislation and their relevance to media classification. "

(Australian Law Reform Commission, 30 September 2011, p.45)

1). Australian Law Reform Commission (September 2011). 'National Classification Scheme Review', Discussion Paper 77

[Recommendations by Australian government agency for media policy and law reform.]

TAGS

2011 • accelerated innovation • access • ACMA • ALRC • Australia • Australian Communications and Media Authority • Australian Law Reform Commission • Australian Law Reform Commission Act • broadbandbroadcasting • broken concepts • changeconsumptionconvergencedigitisationdiscussion paper • federal agency • globalisation • Graham Meikle • high-speed broadband • ICTknowledge-based economylaw • legal reform • legislation • media classification • media consumermedia convergencemedia policymedia regulation • National Classification Scheme • old media • private media • private media consumption • reform • reform of media classification • reviewtechnological innovationtelecommunications • telecommunications legislation • trends • user-created content

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2009

Phillip Blond: Rise of the red Tories

"We live in a time of crisis. In such times humans retreat to safety, and build bulwarks against the future. The financial emergency is having this effect on Britain's governing class. Labour has withdrawn to the safety of the sheltering state, and the comforts of its first income tax rise since the mid–1970s. Meanwhile, the Conservatives appear to be proposing a repeat of Thatcherite austerity in the face of economic catastrophe. But this crisis is more than an ordinary recession. It represents a disintegration of the idea of the 'market state' and makes obsolete the political consensus of the last 30 years. A fresh analysis of the ruling ideological orthodoxy is required.
...
On a deeper level, the present moment is a challenge to conservatism itself. The Conservatives are still viewed as the party of the free market, an idea that has collapsed into monopoly finance, big business and deregulated global capitalism. Tory social thinking has genuinely evolved, but the party's economic thinking is still poised between repetition and renewal. As late as August 2008 David Cameron said: 'I'm going to be as radical a social reformer as Margaret Thatcher was an economic reformer,' and that 'radical social reform is what this country needs right now.' He is right about society, but against the backdrop of collapsing markets and without a macro–economic alternative, Thatcherite economics has been wrongfooted by events."
(Phillip Blond, Prospect Magazine February 2009 issue 155)

TAGS

2009austeritycapitalismchange • civil association • conservatismConservativescrisisDavid Camerondecentralisation • financial emergency • free market economyglobal capitalismglobal financial crisisglobal financial systemLabour • late-modern • Margaret Thatcher • market state • mutualism • neoliberalism • Phillip Blond • politicspost-traditionalreformsocial change • social reform • stateTorytransformationUK • voluntary association

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2007

Regionalisation: Educational Reform In New Zealand

Peter Roberts (School of Education, University of Auckland, NZ)
Teachers, Boards of Trustees and tertiary administrators have been held accountable for decisions relating to the day–to–day running of educational establishments, yet the parameters for undertaking these duties have been defined elsewhere. The market has been the seen as the ideal model on which to base educational arrangements. Competition between students, staff and institutions has been encouraged. Students have been redefined as 'consumers', and tertiary education institutions have become 'providers'. Bureaucrats now talk of 'inputs', 'outputs' and 'throughputs' in the education system. Any notion of educational processes serving a form of collective public good has all but disappeared; instead, participation in tertiary education is now regarded as a form of private investment.

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TAGS

accountable • Aotearoa New ZealandcompetitioneducationJean-Francois Lyotardneoliberalism • postmodern condition • reform • Roberts • teacher • tertiary • university
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