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Which clippings match 'Reflection' keyword pg.1 of 3
21 JULY 2012

Reflection-in-action: framing, naming, moving and reflecting

"Reflection–in–action proceeds by a construction cycle of framing, naming, moving and reflecting. Framing and naming concern the problem–setting in that the designer constructs a problem out of a situation by naming the things to which she will pay attention whilst at the same time framing the way that the problem is viewed (Schön 1991). Framing in this sense imposes an order onto the problem; moves are made towards a solution in relation to how the situation is framed. However, the situation 'talks back'; surprise at the outcomes of moves leads to reflecting. Reflecting on outcomes may trigger either further moves or a new framing (Schön 1996). Reflection–inaction is not an interruption to fluid action; it is always embedded within action."

(Simone Stumpf and Janet McDonnell, CiteSeerX)

1). Simone Stumpf and Janet McDonnell, "Individual Learning Styles and Perceptions of Experiential Learning in Design Teams"

TAGS

CiteSeerX • conceptualisation cycle • construction cycle • cycle of learningdesign educationdesign problemdesign solutiondesign teamsDonald Schonexperiential learningframingindividual learning styles • Janet McDonnell • knowledge cycle • learning styles • moving and reflecting • naming • naming activities • naming processpedagogy • Pennsylvania State University • problem-setting • reflecting • reflectionreflection-in-action • Simone Stumpf • talk back

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 NOVEMBER 2011

Narratives for Europe: Launderette

"Imagine that you have just got home late from a long day of work only to be confronted by an endless list of chores. You drag yourself and an old bag of dirty clothes to the laundromat around the corner. Suddenly some young film–maker is putting a camera in your face and asking you about your laundry, your life and your ever–fading childhood dreams. At first you want to be left alone–get out of my face! But after a while you relax. It feels good to talk and it feels good to listen. On your way home, you keep thinking about the stories you told and the ones you heard. Your mind just keeps on spinning...

The scenario of the short film 'Laundrette' transforms an anonymous public space into a dynamic one where stories are swapped and strangers are given faces. The film also acts as a remarkable metaphor for what Narratives for Europe wants to become: an open space where significant stories can be voiced, echoed and debated. Selected from the media collection of ECF's Youth and Media programme, 'Laundrette' was awarded 'Best Documentary' at the BFI Futures Film Festival 2011 in London. You can watch this film and other shorts on ECF's VIMEOchannel.

The BFI recruited this video and is one of the 6 partners of the Doc Next Network. This network functions as the core of the Youth & Media Programme of the European Cultural Foundation (ECF). Doc Next is a unique movement of independent cultural and media organisations working with young people and media in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands, Poland, Turkey and Scandinavia."

(European Cultural Foundation)

"Launderette": Director – Bertie Telezynski, Producer – Johnny Orme, Producer – Mark Davies, Cinematographer – Alex Nevill, Cinematographer – Rachel Lewis, Editor – Louis Rossi, Sound – Liam Cook

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TAGS

2011 • ambition • anonymous public space • auteurBFI • BFI Futures Film Festival • broken relationships • camera in your face • childhood • childhood dreams • childhood memories • chores • confrontational stories • desolate space • Doc Next Network • documentaryECFEuropeEuropean Cultural Foundationexistential insightfilmfilmmaker • fragmented memories • human conditionimaginative stories • independent cultural and media organisations • late night • launderette • laundrette • Laundrette (film) • laundroma • laundromat • laundry • long day of work • lost family • mediamemorymoments • moments of personal insight • Narratives for Europe • Netherlandsopen spacePolandpublic spacereflection • reflexive documentary • Scandinaviashort film • significant stories • Spainstoriesstrangersstring theory • swap • TurkeyUK • young film-maker • young people • your life • Youth and Media • Youth and Media Programme

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 APRIL 2011

Visual Directions: reflective writing (and the design process)

"Reflection is an ongoing process of thinking about your development in relation to your work. Reflective writing is both a record (description) and a review (analysis and evaluation) of your work. Reflective practice is a 'sorting out/clarifying process' (Moon 2004) giving you new perspectives on yourself and your work."

(University of the Arts London)

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TAGS

analysis and evaluation • artistic practiceblogging • Centre for Learning and Teaching in Art and Design • Centres for Excellence in Teaching and LearningCETL • clarifying process • CLTAD • conceptualisation • Creative Learning in Practice • Creative Learning in Practice (CLIP) • creative practicecreative work • descriptive • design educationdesign processe-learningelearning • Jenny Moon • learning journalonline journalspedagogyreflectionreflectivereflective journalreflective practicereflective writingreviewsketchbook • sorting out • theory buildingthinking processUniversity of the Arts London (UAL)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2011

Returning to Michael Powell's Peeping Tom after 15 years

"Peeping Tom has been widely celebrated as one of the great films about looking, about consumption, about cinema, about art, about the artist, about the relation between the artist, the artwork and the audience, about the relation between looking and pleasure, looking and desire, looking and death, and so on. All very familiar stuff from Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis and film studies (the film's tailor–made for film studies – bring in some Freud here, some Bataille and de Sade there, add a little Lacan and Virillio, etc). The aggressive and violating camera, as Scorsese put it. And this is partly the problem with Peeping Tom. Like the films of Peter Greenaway or David Cronenberg, Peeping Tom is more like an academic essay about voyeurism and scopophilia, a join–the–dots lecture on the pleasures, risks and dangers of art. Plus, Peeping Tom employs the most stereotypical, cliched thriller/ murder mystery plot you can imagine: a young man, a loner, a misfit, introspective, morbid, an outsider figure, abused as a child, etc etc etc, who murders sexualized women (prostitutes and actresses), and is befriended by an innocent he cannot bring himself to corrupt or kill.

Powell attacks the subject of voyeurism and murder aggressively in the opening scenes: the close–ups on cameras, projectors and eyes, the mirrors and reflections, exaggerated sounds (the rattle of a projector, a dripping tap, a heartbeat, whispered voiceover), and his love of visual rhymes and puns (eyes, drinks, sticks and tripods). You can see Powell having a ball in orchestrating his elaborate camera moves, his erotic, sleazy mise–en–abyme, his film–within–a–film tropes (Powell playing the murderer's father and torturer in home movies which he shot himself), the multiple reflections, mirrors, lenses, cameras, projections and screens (every shot in Peeping Tom seems to have been lit by a raking, unfiltered, unflattering horizontal light). It's not that Powell isn't at the top of his game in Peeping Tom – in its way, Peeping Tom is every bit as inventive as Powell's best work – it's that the plot, the characters, the situations are so cheesy, predictable, and shallow.

Despite all this, though, Peeping Tom does have bite and a nastiness which age hasn't dimmed. Peeping Tom also still feels 'contemporary' in its psychoanalytic treatment of a serial killer plot which draws on prostitution, cinema, acting, and pornography. And the conceit of having a murder in the opening shots which's replayed a moment later over the credits is a tour–de–force (one of the film's best cinematic ideas, this says everything necessary, and economically, in the first five minutes)."

(Jeremy Robinson)

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TAGS

1960abuseaggressionartartistartworkaudienceBritish directorBritish film directorcameracinemaclicheclose-upconsumptionDavid Cronenbergdeathdesire • Emeric Pressburger • erotic • essayfilmfilm studies • film-within-a-film • Freudian • Georges Bataille • innocenceintrospectionJacques Lacan • join-the-dots • Leo Marks • loner • looking • Marquis de Sade • Martin ScorseseMichael Powellmirrormise-en-abymemisfitmorbidmurdermurder mysteryoutsider • Paul Virilio • Peeping Tom (film) • Peter Greenawaypleasurepornographyprojectorprostitutionpsychoanalysis • pun • reflectionscopophilia • scoptophilia • serial killer • sexualised • sleazy • stereotypethrillerUKviolation • visual rhyme • voyeurism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2011

Enabling meaning-making through reflective writing

"Otis College of Art and Design Teaching Tips: Reflective Writing with Parme Giuntini. The Liberal Arts and Sciences Faculty share their tips on a variety of classroom suggestions to improve the quality of teaching. and therefore learning."

(Otis College of Art and Design, California)

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TAGS

analytical skillsclassroomcognitive constructivismcontente-portfolioelearningeLearning 2.0electronic portfolioengagementinformal languagejournallearning • meaning-making • MySpace • Otis College • Otis Teaching Tips • Parme Giuntini • pedagogyreflectionreflective journalreflective writingteachingtheory-in-usewriting

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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