Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Makers' keyword pg.1 of 1
01 JULY 2014

The art object does not embody a form of knowledge

"In this paper, I start from the position that the proper goal of visual arts research is visual art. An alternative position is that the art making process yields knowledge that is independent of the actual art objects produced. However, this relegates the art object to that of a by–product of the knowledge acquisition process, and, in my view, places visual art making in the service of some other discipline. Notwithstanding the fact that valuable knowledge may be acquired in this way, from my standpoint it would be undesirable for this to become the dominant mode of arts research. Therefore, from my position the most interesting proposition to explore is the claim that the art object is a form of knowledge since it locates the art object as a central and fundamental component of the knowledge acquisition process.

Nevertheless, as you will see, in this paper I argue against this proposition. I will not claim that the visual art object cannot communicate knowledge–it can. Instead, I will argue that this knowledge is typically of a superficial nature and cannot account for the deep insights that art is usually thought to endow into emotions, human nature and relationships, and our place in the World, etc. In short, I aim to demonstrate that visual art is not, nor has it ever been, primarily a form of knowledge communication; nor is it a servant of the knowledge acquisition enterprise."

(Stephen Scrivener, 2002)

Scrivener, Stephen (2002) "The art object does not embody a form of knowledge". Working Papers in Art & Design – Vol 2.

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
23 MARCH 2014

Bot & Dolly and the Rise of Creative Robots

"This is Bot & Dolly, a boutique design studio that specializes in combining massive mechanical arms with custom software for movies, architecture, digital fabrication, and entertainment installations. 'We're a culture of makers, of creators with open minds,' says Tobias Kinnebrew, Bot & Dolly's director for product strategy. 'We work on things that don't seem possible and try to make them possible.'

One of Bot & Dolly's first clients, Google (GOOG), bought into that vision quite literally. In 2012 it commissioned Bot & Dolly to create an attention–grabbing experience to promote its Nexus Q media–streaming device at the Google I/O conference. Bot & Dolly built an 8–foot–across, 300–pound Nexus Q mounted on a robot arm that passersby controlled via several Nexus gadgets working in tandem. ...

Bot & Dolly was started four years ago by Jeff Linnell and Randy Stowell, as a side project at their video production company, Autofuss. (The cafe at the front of their building, called Front, is the pair's latest joint endeavor.) Still operating independently with around 20 full–timers, Bot & Dolly is best known for bringing weightlessness to the big screen for last year's Oscar–winning film Gravity."

(David Pescovitz, 20 March 2014, Bloomberg Businessweek)

1
2

TAGS

2012 • animation in real space • attention-grabbing experience • augmented spaceblack and whiteBloomberg Businessweek • Bot and Dolly • boutique design studio • boxcommissioncreatorscustom softwaredesign studio • entertainment installation • Google (GOOG)Google I/OGravity (2013) • Jeff Linnell • makers • mechanical arm • media-streaming device • Nexus Q • projection mapping • Randy Stowell • robot arm • robotic projectorsrobotic systemsrobotic technology • video production company • video projection worksvisual spectacle • weightlessness

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Handmade in Britain: The Story of Wallpaper

"In the second programme in the series, presenter Paul Martin reveals the secret history of wallpaper from the 17th century to the present day.

The film explores how wallpaper, seemingly so fragile and easy to replace, provides a vital index of changing tastes in the home. The programme shows how from its earliest days wallpaper imitated other, more costly wall coverings: from the 17th–century papers that were designed to look like embroidered textiles to 18th–century flocked wallpapers. The latter, intended as a cheaper substitute for costly damasks or velvets, became a triumph of British innovation, coming to grace the grandest of state apartments and country house interiors.

Focussing on how wallpaper was actually made, the programme goes onto explore how it became one of the battlefields in discussions about design in the 19th century. For, although technological innovations in machine printing had allowed manufacturers to print elaborate designs with complex colour–ways, some commentators were shocked by the poor aesthetic quality of British wallpapers. The programme looks at how designers and reformers attempted to take the situation in hand: from 'The False Principles of Design', an exhibition organised by Sir Henry Cole, the first Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, which sought to instruct the British public in good and bad design; to the pioneering work of Augustus Pugin and William Morris.

Finally, the film traces the fortunes of wallpaper in the 20th century. Patterned walls faced stiff competition from the purity of plain, painted or whitewashed walls, as advocated by modernists like Le Corbusier. However, new techniques, like screen–printing, allowed shorter runs of innovate wallpapers, which were aimed at architects and interior designers. And, as Paul Martin discovers, wallpaper is still flourishing at the beginning of the 21st century. A combination of digital printing, screen–printing and hand–printing allows companies, like Timorous Beasties, to produce exciting new designs.

Presented by Paul Martin, contributors include Christine Woods, Anthony Wells–Cole, Martha Armitage, Allyson McDermott and Paul Simmons (Timorous Beasties), as well as V&A experts."

First broadcast on 25 September 2013 on BBC Four as part of the Handmade in Britain series [http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03bm1rg].

1

TAGS

16th century17th century18th century19th century20th century21st century • Allyson McDermott • Anthony Wells-Cole • antiqueart and craftsArts and Crafts Movement • Augustus Pugin • bad design • BBC Four • changing tastes • Christine Woods • colourways • damask • deluxe item • design craftdigital printingdomestic material object • elaborate designs • embroidered textiles • flock wallpaper • good design • hand-printing • Handmade in Britain (series) • Henry Cole • industrial grime • interior design • interior designer • interior stylingLe Corbusierluxury • machine printing • makersmanufacturing technology • Marthe Armitage • Palladio Wallpapers • pattern • Paul Martin • Paul Simmons • poisonprinting processscreenprinting • stately homes • technological innovation • The False Principles of Design • Timorous Beasties • two-up-two-down • velvetVictoria and Albert Museum • wall coverings • wallpaperwallpaper design • wallpapering • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 SEPTEMBER 2012

UK Artist Opportunities through Jerwood Makers Open 2013

"Jerwood Makers Open is designed to commission and showcase new work by emerging artists working in the applied arts. Five commissions of £7,500 will be awarded to artists to create new work, to be exhibited as part of the JVA programme at Jerwood Space, London and on tour nationally. Artists will be chosen by an independent selection panel and must be UK resident and within 10 years of graduating or setting up their practice.

BACKGROUND: Launched in 2010, Jerwood Makers Open has been developed to create a space in which to recognise and celebrate the significance of making practice and process within the contemporary visual arts. This initiative offers makers at the early stages of their careers an opportunity to develop their creative ideas independently of specific commissioning structures by submitting a proposal for new work. It totals an investment of £37,500 in new applied arts commissions.

Jerwood Visual Arts, developed and managed by the Jerwood Charitable Foundation, is committed to supporting and showcasing contemporary applied arts practice. The Jerwood Applied Arts Prize ran for 11 years (1999–2007) in partnership with the Crafts Council. This was followed from 2008 to 2010 by Jerwood Contemporary Makers, a nominated exhibition series which provided a platform to show new and emergent work in the field of making."

(Jerwood Visual Arts, UK)

Fig.1 Glithero, Burn Burn Burn (after) [http://www.glithero.com/contact–us].

1
2

TAGS

2013 • applied art • applied arts • artist opportunities • artists • arts prize • burningcommissioncommissioning • contemporary applied arts • contemporary applied practice • contemporary visual artscreative ideasearly career • emergent work • emerging artistsJerwood Charitable Foundation • Jerwood Contemporary Makers • Jerwood Makers Open • Jerwood Space • Jerwood Visual Arts • JVA • Londonmakers • making practice • new work • UK • UK Crafts Council • visual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.