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Which clippings match 'Redesign' keyword pg.1 of 2
14 SEPTEMBER 2015

Design for Action: designing the immaterial artefact

"Throughout most of history, design was a process applied to physical objects. Raymond Loewy designed trains. Frank Lloyd Wright designed houses. Charles Eames designed furniture. Coco Chanel designed haute couture. Paul Rand designed logos. David Kelley designed products, including (most famously) the mouse for the Apple computer.

But as it became clear that smart, effective design was behind the success of many commercial goods, companies began employing it in more and more contexts. High-tech firms that hired designers to work on hardware (to, say, come up with the shape and layout of a smartphone) began asking them to create the look and feel of user-interface software. Then designers were asked to help improve user experiences. Soon firms were treating corporate strategy making as an exercise in design. Today design is even applied to helping multiple stakeholders and organizations work better as a system.

This is the classic path of intellectual progress. Each design process is more complicated and sophisticated than the one before it. Each was enabled by learning from the preceding stage. Designers could easily turn their minds to graphical user interfaces for software because they had experience designing the hardware on which the applications would run. Having crafted better experiences for computer users, designers could readily take on nondigital experiences, like patients' hospital visits. And once they learned how to redesign the user experience in a single organization, they were more prepared to tackle the holistic experience in a system of organizations."

(Tim Brown and Roger Martin, 2015, Harvard Business Review)

A version of this article appeared in the September 2015 issue (pp.56–64) of Harvard Business Review.

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Bill BuxtonCharles EamesCoco Chanelcomplex systems • David Kelley • design history • design intervention • design processdesign thinking • design-oriented approach • design-oriented thinkingdesigned artefactethnographic design approachFrank Lloyd Wright • genuinely innovative strategies • graphical user interfaceHarvard Business ReviewHerbert Simon • holistic user experience • IDEOimmateriality • intervention design • iPoditerative prototyping • iterative rapid-cycle prototyping • iTunes Store • Jeff Hawkins • look and feellow-fidelity prototype • low-resolution prototype • nondigital experiences • PalmPilot • Paul Randpersonal digital assistantphysical objectsrapid prototyping • Raymond Loewy • redesignRichard Buchananrole of the designerservice designuser experienceuser experience design (UX)user feedbackuser interface designwicked problems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2013

The PalmGrip for Sony NEX6 and NEX7 cameras

"The Sony NEX6 and NEX7 camera has many menus, dials and buttons, mostly controlled by the right hand. The short height of the camera can cause a problem when holding it, as changing one's grip is needed in order to position the thumb and index finger to operate the controls. While looking through the EVF, this re–positioning can require pulling the camera away from the eye in order to see and operate the controls and put additional demands on the left hand to secure the camera.

The PalmGrip can maximize control of the camera functions by positioning the camera high in the right hand, where the thumb and index fingers operate the controls, and the middle and 4th ring finger hold the camera grip securely against the palm."

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TAGS

accessory • camera accessory • compact design • grip • hand-held • holding • human factors • Jim Buchanan • manipulate things • MoonRuby Products • NEX-6 • NEX-7 • PalmGrip • photographypick upproduct designredesign • retrofit • Sony NEX seriesuser needsworking with our hands

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

UK start-up product design agency Made In Mind

"Made in Mind was founded in 2009 by Matthew Judkins and Min–Kyu Choi. The duo met on the campuses of Imperial College and the Royal College of Art and formed the company to commercialise the Folding Plug design concept that Min–Kyu developed during his studies. Numerous individuals and organisations joined Matthew and Min–Kyu along the way to contribute to the development, funding and marketing of the concept which was realised in 2012 with the launch of the Mu. Made in Mind, now consisting of a diverse team of industry and technical professionals, are in the process of extending the product pipeline and placing the Mu on the global stage."

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TAGS

2009AC power plugadapterscommercialisationcompact designdesign conceptdesign innovation • folding plug • Imperial College Londonindustrial designMA Product Design • Made in Mind • Matthew Judkins • Min-Kyu Choiminiaturisation • Mu USB Charger • product designredesignRoyal College of Artstart-up businessUK • USB Smartphone charger

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2012

U+MAG: an independent Brazilian digital magazine

"In some religions, one must be baptized in water for a new, sinless person to emerge. Maybe that can unfold, in different ways, for a magazine like U+MAG, which is created from scratch every three months, sinless and clean – as I've said in past issues. And in life, it's sometimes crucial to be born again, everyday. But there is a baptism inside this edition, and it happened through images by Lucas Bori and Fernando Mazza. They are responsible (together with Cassia Tabatini, Daniel Malva, Tiago Chediak and Hugo Toni) for the pictures that act as breathers within this issue, which marks a transition to a new phase for the magazine. It is now divided between online (exclusive stories regularly posted on our website), mobile (iPad, iPhone and Android) and print (print on demand is the future!). This issue of U+MAG is special for another reason: it's our anniversary edition (but without golden, celebratory caps) and also because it celebrates in an unconventional way and running from stereotypes what an emerging nation can show the world. In this issue's opening pages, Bruno Munari's quote is the perfect translation for what we want to convey. Things that make our lives interesting. It's not as if the magazine has a message such as 'Yes, we have Bananas, and they are the world's best'. It's much more than that: we present Brazilian imagery outside of the tourist package that's usually spread around, specially when the country concerned is about to host a World Cup and the Olympics. But we treat it all ironically (e.g. the story shot by Vitor Pickersgill, inspired by the carioca piriguetes, a term for local, shamelessly clad girls) and poetically (such as the Iemanja 2.0, beautifully impersonated by Thais Custodio). If we focused the whole issue on Brazil, however, we would be closing ourselves to the world. And it goes against our principles. That's why the stories shot by our foreign collaborators are indispensable for U+MAG's universe. They are essential for our formula to work out. Our exaggerated, bold and visually ever changing spirit will remain intact. The covers, on the other hand, will suffer a redesign in 2013. A preview of that process is the cover of our special collector's issue–all to value photography and imagery. Besides, fresh air is always appreciated. A special thanks for all who were part of U+MAG's history so far, and hello for all newcomers, who believe in our work and our philosophy."

(U+MAG, 2012)

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TAGS

2004 • a transition to a new phase • acid-free paper • Android OS • anniversary edition • bold • BrazilBrazilian • Brazilian imagery • Bruno Munari • carioca piriguetes • content formcreative people • digital magazine • emerging nation • exaggerated • exclusive online content • FIFA World Cup • HP Indigo digital press • independent publishersiPadiPhonemagazine • MagCloud • make our lives interesting • Olympicsprint on demandredesign • Rio 2016 • rising talents • stereotypes • tourist destination • U+MAG • verified recycled sources • visual communication • visual intact • web magazine • whats happening • whats next • whats past

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2012

Folding Plug System: redesigning the UK 3-pin plug

"'Mac book Air,' Apple's latest master–piece, is the world's thinnest laptop ever. However, here in the U.K, we still use the world's biggest three–pin plug. Most people carry laptops with adapters and plugs because laptop batteries have limitations on the time they can be used. When people carry laptops with U.K plugs in a bag, it always causes problems such as tearing paper, scratching laptop surfaces and, sometimes, it breaks other stuff. The main problem is the UK standard 3–pin plug is not considered in the process of designing for mobility. My intention of the project was directed to make the plug as slim as possible and follow the British Standard regulation at the same time."

(Min–Kyu Choi, 20 April 2009, http://www.minkyu.co.uk/Site/Product/Entries/2009/4/20_Folding_Plug_System.html)

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TAGS

19462009 • AC • AC power plugadaptersApple • Apple MacBook Air • British Standard • compact • designdesign innovation • designing for mobility • engineering regulationa • everyday • everyday product • folded plugs • foldingindustrial designinnovationinnovative designlaptoplaptops • MacBook Air • mains plug • Min-Kyu Choiminiaturisation • multi-plug adaptor • plug • power cord • power lead • power plug • power plugs • productproduct designredesignredesigningRoyal College of Art • slim • slimline • smart design • space saver • standard plug • standard UK plug • three-pin plug • UK • UK standard • UK standard 3-pin plug • wafer thin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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