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Which clippings match 'Recording' keyword pg.1 of 3
18 MARCH 2012

Coding cultural riches: Investigating indigenous languages in Australia

"It's very fundamental to Aboriginal belief that language and land are connected, and it is appropriate to speak the language of the land on which you're residing. So it was quite natural that Murrinh–Patha would have become the primary language of the indigenous people living on the mission."

(Rachel Nordlinger)

Fig.2 "Coding cultural riches: Investigating indigenous languages in Australia: Linguist Dr Rachel Nordlinger discusses how Australian Aboriginal languages are researched and how particular indigenous tongues grow at the expense of others as communities migrate. Presented by Jennifer Cook.", Up Close, University of Melbourne.

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Aboriginal languages • Aboriginal mythologyancestorsAustralia • Australian Aboriginal languages • Australian Aboriginal On-line TelevisionAustralian Aborigine • Australian languages • belief systems • Bilinarra • coding cultural riches • creole • creole language • cultural codes • cultural coding • cultural identitydescribingdocumenting • dreamtime • Dreamtime ancestors • East Timor • East Timorese languages • grammar • grammatical structures • identityIndigenousIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous language • indigenous languages • indigenous tongues • Jennifer Cook • kinship categories • language • language of landscape • language of the landscape • limits of my language are the limits of my worldlingo • linguist • linguistics • morphological theory • Murrinh-Patha • mythologyNorthern Territory • Pacific linguistics • podcast • Rachel Nordlinger • recording • syntactic theory • Tetun Dili • traditional languages • University of Melbourne • Up Close (podcast) • Wambaya

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

Plural Eyes: sync software for dual-system and multi-camera audio

"PluralEyes is a product that can save you a lot of time, especially if you have good clear audio recorded with each camera. If there is too much redundancy in the audio tracks (concert) or a lot of echo in some of the tracks (Church) you may find that PluralEyes will only be able to match a part of the sequence, leaving clips on the timeline that need to be manually synced. When this happens you can try locking the clips that were successfully synced, then exporting the sequence once again in hopes that PluralEyes will find a match for the unlocked clips, but I personally haven't had too much luck with that process.

The biggest issue I have with any type of automated software is that if it's not 100% accurate, you learn not to fully trust it and rightfully so. When you have multiple tracks to sync and potentially hundreds of clips, it becomes a daunting task to have to go through the entire edit – once for each track you were trying to sync, just to make sure that all the clips are in their proper position. It may be just as quick (or as time consuming) to sync up your clips manually as it is to use automated software that might have to be re–run a few times before finally coming close – only to force you to manually go through your piece clip by clip and track–by–track to check its accuracy.

PluralEyes can save you tons of editing time, but it's really important to have good clear audio with each track you want to sync. On the first few projects that I used PluralEyes for CS5 with I was pretty disappointed with the results. I even delayed this review until I had more experience with the software. Now that I have learned not to expect 100% accuracy I have stopped 're–syncing' and 're–syncing' in hopes of achieving it. I let PluralEyes do most of the grunt work, then I go through and just manually sync up the small percentage of clips it missed. It's pretty easy to do since most of my footage is shot in chronological order so I know that clip C will need to go somewhere between clips B and D.

Part of my high expectations with this software was due to the many demo videos I have seen, not just from PluralEyes, but also from other reviewers. Their videos often show PluralEyes successfully syncing up just a few clips, so when I started to test the software with more involved edits it was aggravating to discover a percentage of clips that weren't synced. I wasted a lot of time trying to figure out why and trying to re–sync these projects, which in–turn wasted more time. Once I got over my high expectations I become much more productive. PluralEyes can truly save you hours of editing time, especially once you learn that itis sometimes quicker to manually sync the small percentage of clips that the software misses than it is to fiddle around with re–syncing using different settings."

(Ron Risman, March 2010, Cameratown.com)

Fig.1 Justin Davey http://www.mountstudios.co.uk/

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TAGS

Adobe Premiere Pro • audioautomationclapboardclapperclapperboardconvergenceCS4 • CS5 • digital filmmakingDSLR • dual-system audio • DualEyes • editingFinal Cut Pro • Justin Davey • marker • Media Composer • multi-camera • multi-take • multicamera • music video • PluralEyes • post productionproductivityrecording • Singular Software • slateslate boardsoftwaresound recordingsyncsync slatesynchronisationtime slatetimecode • Vegas Pro • videovideo editingvideo post-productionworkflowworkflow tool

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 AUGUST 2010

The UK Soundmap project: mapping Britain's sonic environment

"The SoundMap is a partnership project of the British Library and the Noise Futures Network. It uses widely available mobile technology in a novel way to capture and aggregate research–quality audio samples. Your recordings will be studied by experts from the Noise Futures Network and we shall post an overview of the research results once sufficient data has been collected and analysed.

Britain's sonic environment is ever changing. Urbanisation, transport developments, climate change and even everyday lifestyles all affect our built and natural soundscapes. The sounds around us have an impact on our well being. Some sounds have a positive or calming influence. Others can be intrusive and disturbing or even affect our health. By capturing sounds of today and contributing to the British Library's digital collections you can help build a permanent researchable resource."

(The British Library Board)

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around usaudioaudio samplesbelongingcitycollectiveconvergencecountrysideculturedigital collectionsenvironmenteverydayexperiencegeographylifestylelocationlocation-specificmobilemobile technology • natural soundscapes • Noise Futures Network • placeplace-based contentrecordingresearchresourcesocial changesonic environmentsound • SoundMap • soundscapetechnologyUKurbanisationwellbeing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JULY 2010

The Talking Newspaper

"This vivid account of how sound and action reels are made lays bare for you the secrets of a new industry."

(Popular Science Monthly, Aug, 1930)

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19301950s1960s20th centurycinemacurrent affairsdocumentaryentertainmentfeature filmfilmfilmed news storieshistorical documentsjournalismmagazinemoving imagenewsnews reportingnews storiesnewspapernewsreelold media • Popular Science Monthly • processrecordingreportingshort subjects • talking newspaper • technologytelevision • theatrette • topical • visual depictionvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2010

The Creative Industries KTN: the future of digital content

"This document has been created to help people understand the radical transformation digital content will have on the creative industries, and to provide businesses with outline areas of opportunity where innovation is most likely to occur.

In the past decade, digital content has become a part of everyday life for all. Yet the changes that will occur in the next 5–10 years will be profound. They have the power to alter the way we live, work, play, learn and help us to live longer, more fulfilling lives. These changes will substantially alter existing business models and markets.

Many historical innovations such as new recording formats, more powerful consoles and new advertising media were incremental. They changed formats and created new opportunities, but they did not alter the industrial landscape. The changes taking place now are paradigm shifts that challenge the value chain as a whole.

These changes represent huge opportunities, or threats if not understood. For games designers, it may mean the migration from console platforms to cloud based applications and casual gaming communities. For TV programmes it may mean the end of broadcast, where their content must be found and consumed on numerous devices. For publishers it may mean the migration to new consumption platforms that radically alter distribution channels. For industrial designers, it may mean the need to move from object creation to experience creation. For all it means the need to radically shift their thinking.

The following pages outline the key areas highlighted by a project that has engaged with hundreds of key stakeholders across the creative industries and technology industries seeking to map the landscape of the future of digital content."

(Kelechi Amadi, March 2010)

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2010 • advertising media • Beacons for Innovation • broadcastingbusiness modelscasual gaming • casual gaming communities • cloud based applications • cloud computingconsoleconsumptionconsumption platformsconvergencecreative economycreative industriesCreative Industries Knowledge Transfer Networkdigital contentdistributioneconomic changeexperience creationformat • games consoles • historical innovations • industrial landscape • innovationKnowledge Transfer Networkknowledge-based economyKTNmarketsnew mediaold mediaparadigm shiftplatformsproduct designrecordingtechnology • technology industries • Technology Strategy Boardthe future of digital contenttransformation • TSB • TVUKvalue chain

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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