Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'El Lissitzky' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 SEPTEMBER 2014

About Two squares: In 6 constructions: A Suprematist Tale (Suprematicheskii Skaz Pro Dva Kvadrata v Shesti Postroikakh)

"This short book, intended for children of all ages, is perhaps the best–known work of El Lissitzky (1890–1941). Lissitzky was a Russian artist, architect, designer, typographer, and photographer who was active in the avante garde movement that flourished in Soviet Russia and in Germany, until the dominance of Soviet Realism by 1930 put a stop to its revolutionary activity. He directly influenced the typographical and display advertising innovations of the Bauhaus and 'de Stijl'. This book entirely integrates modern typographical effects, as Lissitzky intended, with his illustrations in the Suprematist style.

The original book About Two Squares was printed by letterpress, even the slanted text and illustrations. It was first produced ('constructed') in 1920 at the Soviet art institute UNOVIS in Vitebsk, and around April 1922 printed by Sycthian Press, Berlin, by Haberland Printers, Leipzig, in paperback, with 50 hardbound copies autographed and numbered, as the copyright page states."

1
2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

TAGS

1922 • About 2 Squares (El Lissitzky) • allegory • art books • artistartists booksavant-garde artists • avant-garde movement • black square • Bolshevism • childrens bookDe Stijldesign formalismEl LissitzkyFuturismgeometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric primitivegraphic designgraphic design historyibiblioJew • Lazar Markovich Lissitzky • letterpress printinglithographymanifestomodernist aesthetics • modernist utopian vision • non-objective art • offset litho • offset printingpaperback • periodical design • picture bookprintingprintmaking • propagandist works • red circle • red square • Russian constructivism • Russian nationalism • sans-serif typeface • Soviet propaganda • Soviet Russiasquare • story of revolution • Suprematism • suprematism movement • suprematist aesthetics • typographical effects • typography • UNOVIS (Affirmers of the New Art) • utilitarianvisual abstraction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 SEPTEMBER 2014

MoMA: Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s

Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s, March 19–July 28, 2008, The Yoshiko and Akio Morita Media Gallery, second floor, The Museum of Modern Art.

"This exhibition considers the transformation of the art object from static image to light projection within two distinct artistic lineages: the unconventional optical techniques and social analyses of the 1920s Neue Optik, or 'New Vision,' generation of artists, among them László Moholy–Nagy, Hans Richter, and Marcel Duchamp; and the situational aesthetics advanced by Gordon Matta–Clark, Robert Smithson, and Anthony McCall in the 1970s. Drawing attention to the conditions and complexities of perception–both within the framework of institutional display and in other surroundings–these artists have redefined the social potential of visual agency."

1
2

3

TAGS

1920s1970safterimage • Anthony McCall • art object • artistic lineage • durationEl Lissitzkyexhibitionexperimental cinema • fluid light projection • geometric abstraction • Gordon Matta-Clark • Hans Richter • Hollis Frampton • immaterialityintangible creationsJames Turrell • Klaus Biesenbach • Laszlo Moholy-Nagylight and space • light and space movement • light artlight projectionMarcel Duchamp • Maria Nordman • materialisationmotion artsmovementmovement-image • moving through space • Museum of Modern Art • Neue Optik (New Vision) • non-narrative • objecthood • objecthood and space • optical techniques • Paul Sharits • peripatetic • Richard Serra • Robert Irving (artist) • Robert Irwin • Robert Smithson • Roxana Marcoci • solid light films • static image • structural film • VernissageTV (VTV) • Viking Eggeling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JANUARY 2014

100+ Years of Design Manifestos

"Since the days of radical printer–pamphleteers, design and designers have a long history of fighting for what's right and working to transform society. The rise of the literary form of the manifesto also parallels the rise of modernity and the spread of letterpress printing. ...

The original list was largely drawn from Mario Piazza's presentation at the Più Design Può conference in Florence, though I've edited and added to it. I've also incorporated links where I was able to find them."

(John Emerson, 22 July 2009, Social Design Notes)

1

TAGS

Albe Steiner • Alberto Marangoni • Allan Chochinov • anti-manifesto • Antonio Sant Elia • architectureArts and Crafts MovementBauhaus School • Blair Enns • Bruce MauBruce SterlingBruno TautDanish designDe Stijl • Dean Allen • design manifesto • Dieter RamsDogme 95El Lissitzky • Ellen Lupton • Filippo Tommaso MarinettiFuturism • Gelsomino DAmbrosio • Giancarlo Iliprandi • Gianfranco Torri • Giovanni Anceschi • Giovanni Baule • Giovanni Lussu • GNUgood designgraphic designGuy DebordIcogradainfographicsJeffrey Zeldman • Karim Rashid • Kathleen Hanna • Ken Garland • Laszlo Moholy-Nagyletterpress printing • literary form • manifestoManuel Lima • Mario Piazza • Mark Goldman • Marke Hamburg • Michael Erard • Mitch Goldstein • Noah Scalin • pamphleteer • Patrik Schumacher • Pierre Bernard • Pino Grimaldi • publishing • radical rethinking • Scandinavian Design Council • Society of the Spectacle (Guy Debord)typography • Umair Haque • un-manifesto • Walter Gropius • Warren Berger • William McDonough • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.