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Which clippings match 'Sadistic' keyword pg.1 of 1
03 JULY 2015

The Phone Box: allegory about the consequences of dehumanisation

"In a bland square in Madrid, some workers, who are wearing a strange uniform, are installing a phone box. Some moments later, an anonymous citizen, after taking his son to the school bus, gets trapped in the box for no understandable reason. As the day goes by, all kind of strangers go there to see the strange event: some of them try to free him; others make fun of him… Everyone looks interested in this little man. After a distressing delay full of surrealistic moments, the trapped man is taken to a strange factory full of thousands of phone boxes. In each one, a single corpse is trapped, in some strange ritual. The movie ends with a new phone box in another square of the city."

(Aaron Rodriguez, World Cinema Directory)

Antonio Mercero (1972). "La Cabina/The Phone Box", -phone booth location: Calle de Rodríguez San Pedro, 5, Madrid, Spain [http://filmap.tumblr.com/post/98879196634/la-cabina-antonio-mercero-1972-phone-booth-calle].

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TAGS

1972absurd situationsallegory • Antonio Mercero • black tale • caught in a trap • claustrophobic spacescyclical narrativedehumanisation • dehumanised society • distressdisturbing taleenclosed space • entrapment • environment as antagonist • eternal cycle • fait accomplifantasy about deathfeelings of panic • futility • get me the hell out of here • helplessness • high concepthigh concept film • Jose Luis Garci • Jose Luis Lopez Vazquez • La cabina (1972) • macabreMadrid • mummified remains • no escape • phone booth • powerlesspsychological horrorsadisticsarcophagusshort filmSpanish filmspeculative fictionsymbolic meaning • telephone booth • telephone box • The Telephone Box (1972) • tombtrapped • twisted game

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2013

David Reid's 1993 short film 'Traffic Island'

"A disturbing drama . A group of rough, young men walk down a deserted dark street at night, drinking and boasting about a fight they've just been in. Kev, the younger brother, isn't drinking and obviously feels uncomfortable with the situation. He sees someone lying on a traffic island and they cross over to investigate. It's an old man, conscious but not talking. Scaz, Jax and Marty start hassling him, looking for money and generally intimidating him. Kev suggests they try to get help and makes an attempt to wave down passing cars. Scaz pulls a knife on the old man and threatens to give him a hiding.

The old man wets himself in fear and Marty decides to give him a 'shower.' Kev, disgusted with his brother Marty, punches him. Marty retaliates and Kev falls heavily.Scaz and Jax taunt Marty as they walk away. Marty checks Kev is all right and leaves him, saying he had to do it, otherwise what would his friends think? As Kev lies there crying, the old man sits up and pats him on the shoulder."

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TAGS

1993 • Allen OLeary • Aotearoa New Zealandboasting • Chris Plummer • cruelty • Damon Andrews • David Reiddisturbing taledrinking • Endymion Productions • fight • John Chrisstoffels • John Wraight • Jonathan Brough • kiwi short film • Michael Hodgson • Mike Depree • Murray Lynch • New Zealand Film Commission • night • nz short filmold man • Patrick Smyth • Peter DaubeQueen Elizabeth II Arts Council • Ray Beentjes • sadisticShayne Radfordshort filmStephanie Donald • Steve Latty • street • Television New Zealand • traffic islandviolenceyoung men

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2012

Eau De La Vie: a nouveau debutante's moral dilemma

"Set somewhere in the near future, this black tale tells of nouveau debutante Catherine, who is being initiated into her friends' sordid cafe society world. She must choose from a small group of pre–purchased performers who will entertain the diners for the evening – but the 'entertainment' leaves Catherine fighting to the death for what she believes is right."

(New Zealand Film Commission)

Fig. 1,2 Simon Baré (1994). "Eau De La Vie", duration: 13 minutes, 35mm, colour.

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TAGS

199435mmAotearoa New ZealandAustralasiablack talecafe societycruelty • Dark Tales (compilation) • David Geary • death • debutante • dinnerdisturbing tale • Eau De La Vie • entertainment • Eric De Beus • ethical dilemma • gratification • high concept film • Janet Roddick • Jeff Boyd • Kirsty Hamilton • kiwi short films • Mick Rose • moral dilemmaNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand Film CommissionorgasmPeter Daube • Richard Bluck • sadistic • Sarah Smuts-Kennedy • short film • Simon Bare • speculative fictionThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Filmweirdness

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2004

A disturbing little film called A Little Death

"It's a long time since I've seen a film as genuinely disturbing as A Little Death. The title refers to the phrase 'un petite mort'. French slang for orgasm. This surreal film explores all the ambiguity of that phrase to devastating effect. A couple are making love. Or rather having sex – the hostility between them is palpable. The moment of climax flings them both into another dimension where the emotional savagery of their relationship is played out for real. Luscious colour photography gives way to crisp black and white, as Davison crashes through their bed into an identical room where everything, including her lover, is literally two–dimensional, bleached of life but tilled with an almost impersonal hatred. The tension that previously simmered beneath the surface is unleashed in images of extraordinary violence. Brophy, trapped in the 'wallpaper' of this unnatural room, can only scream as she takes her revenge. This ambitious script is well supported by its technically immaculate execution. It is tightly constructed, beautifully edited and the superb soundtrack is unusually effective, an integral part of the film rattler than (as too often happens) an afterthought. Much of the power of the film has to do with its purely visual logic, it didn't start to make sense to me until I stopped trying to figure out what was going on and just let the images wash over me. This is one of those rare films that can stand repeated viewings (providing you can) and serious philosophical debate, despite the fact its violent take on gender relations is more than a little disturbing. A Little Death is an uncommonly brave and passionate piece of filmmaking that stays in the mind long after it's been seen."

(Pavement magazine, 1995)

Fig.1 Simon Perkins and Paul Swadel (1994). "A Little Death", James Wallace Productions: 16mm, 11 minutes. [A Little Death externalises conflict between characters through the use of physical obstacles and camera perspectives. The film is an evolution of the "Into The Void" project.]
Fig.2 Natalie Robertson (1994). Josephine Davison is confused to find herself on a photocopied floor.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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