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07 NOVEMBER 2012

Research Catalogue: international database for artistic research

"The Research Catalogue (RC) is a searchable database for archiving artistic research. RC content is not peer reviewed, nor is it highly controlled for quality, being checked only for appropriateness. As a result, the RC is highly inclusive.

The open source status of the RC is essential to its nature and serves its function as a connective and transitional layer between academic discourse and artistic practice, thereby constituting a discursive field for artistic research.

The RC creates a link between (1) elaborated documentation of the work; and (2) expositions and comments that engage with the contribution of the work as research.

Given that the RC is a site for artistic research, to add a work is to make a claim that the work can be seen as research; through expositions, comments and articles the initial claim is transformed into an argument. It is believed that the reflective space provided by the RC can become an essential part of the research process by providing a suitable structure in which to develop the relationship between documentation and exposition, whilst also retaining congruence with art itself.

Clearly, the RC is the backbone of JAR: potential JAR expositions emerge from the range of the artistic research activities taking place in it for peer–review and development within the RC space itself. Authors may nominate or JAR editors may select expositions for development as JAR contributions.

If you believe that RC software might also support your research database needs then explore the possibility of using the RC as your repository, by contacting us."

(Society of Artistic Research)

TAGS

academic discourse • ARC (acronym) • archiveartistic practiceartistic research • artistic research archive • Artistic Research Catalogue • artistic works as research • artistic works research • commentscreative practice researchcritical commentarydiscourse and practicediscursive field • discursive field for artistic research • documentation and exposition • elaborated documentation of the work • expositions • inclusive arts • information in context • intellectual argument • international database • international design discourseinterpretationJAR (journal)Journal for Artistic Research • journal management system • Karlsruhe University of Arts and Designknowledge commonsknowledge productionknowledge repositoryknowledge sharingnew voicespeer-reviewed • RC (acronym) • reflective space • research archiveresearch articlesResearch Catalogue (service)research collectionresearch databaseresearch processsearchable databasesharing and distributing knowledgesharing ideasSociety for Artistic Research (SAR) • the work as research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2012

Medieval manuscript illustrations were planned not doodled

"it's the word 'doodle' that really riles my pedantic dander. ... because, as I try to make clear, the images I post ... weren't scribbled into the margins by surreptitious snarkers whilst no one was looking. They were explicitly commissioned by the manuscript's patrons as part of the project from the very beginning. For the well–heeled noble, ordering a book was not just a matter of selecting the text; deciding on size, presentation, illustration, and ratio of naked dudes to non–naked dudes in the margins was all part of the process of getting a book made.

This is not to say that medieval readers and scribes didn't ever doodle. It's just easy to tell the difference between images planned as part of the manuscript's commission and those scribbled in by a creative, bored scribe or one of the later owners of the manuscript. Just as you might imagine, a reader might decide a chunk of text was particularly important and make a note in the margin ... Or, someone might just decide a page looked too blank and thus attempt to fill up some of that space [1]... See, the thing about medieval doodles is they look just like modern doodles ...

For this page [2], somebody sat down and sketched out a rough draft, showed it to somebody else, possibly even multiple somebodies. There were meetings. Consultants were brought in. The client was consulted. And at some point somebody said, 'Yes, that's very nice, the nuns smuggling that dude into their nunnery. Very topical. But I don't like that blanket. Too drab. Can we get someone to put some flowers on it? The difference is, I hope, clear. You don't doodle in gold leaf."

(Carl Pyrdum, 13 February 2012, Got Medieval)

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TAGS

annotationannotationsbookclientcomment systemcommentscommission • commissioned • doodledoodlingembellishmentexpository addendum • fill the space • footnotegloss (marginal notation) • gold leaf • illuminated manuscriptillustrationsinformation in contextmanuscript • manuscript illustrations • manuscriptsmargin notes • marginal illustrations • marginal notationmarginaliamarginsmedieval • medieval doodles • medieval readers • modern doodles • nakednotationnote in the marginnotesnunpage • planned images • planned not doodled • rough draft • scholia • scribbled • scribbled into the marginsvisual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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