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Which clippings match 'Readerly Texts' keyword pg.1 of 1
03 SEPTEMBER 2014

Umberto Eco: The Virtual Imagination

"But many internet programs suggest that a story is enriched by successive contributions. … This has sometimes happened in the past without disturbing authorship. With the Commedia dell'arte, every performance was different. We cannot identify a single work due to a single author. Another example is a jazz jam session. We may believe there is a privileged performance of 'Basin Street Blues' because a recording survives. But there were as many Basin Street Blues as there were performances. ... There are books that we cannot rewrite because their function is to teach us about Necessity, and only if they are respected as they are can they provide us with such wisdom. Their repressive lesson is indispensable to reach a higher state of intellectual and moral freedom."

(Umberto Eco, 7 November 2000)

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TAGS

2000authorial signatureauthoritative workauthorship • Basin Street Blues • biographybooks • books-to-be-read • booksellersbookstoresCinderella • closed universe • Commedia dellarte • comprehending languagecomputers • copying machine • e-bookelectronic literatureencyclopaediaend of booksend of print • enriched by successive contributions • every performance is different • evolving formfairy talefatefolioFranz Kafkafuture of the book • god passed over • grammatical rulesheroeshypertexthypertext fiction • hypertextual programme • hypertextual structures • Immanuel Kant • infinite possibilities • infinite texts • intellectual freedom • intellectual needs • jazz jam session • Les Miserables • library catalogue • linear narrative • linearityLittle Red Riding Hoodmanuscripts • moral freedom • Napoleon Bonapartenatural language • necessity • new forms of literacy • obsolete form • open work • Penguin edition • photocopierprint on demand • printed books • printed version • privileged performance • publishing houses • publishing modelreaderly textsreading • reading process • revisionscanningselectionshift to digital • single author • specificity of print • systems and text • tailored consumer experience • texts which can be interpreted in infinite ways • theories of interpretation • tragic beauty • tragic literature • Umberto Eco • unlimited texts • utilitarian value • Victor Hugo • War and Peace • Waterloo • William Shakespeare

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2012

Roland Barthes: Readerly and Writerly Texts

"The writerly text is a perpetual present, upon which no consequent language (which would inevitably make it past) can be superimposed; the writerly text is ourselves writing, before the infinite play of the world (the world as function) is traversed, intersected, stopped, plasticized by some singular system (Ideology, Genus, Criticism) which reduces the plurality of entrances, the opening of networks, the infinity of languages."

(Roland Barthes, p.5)

1). Roland Barthes (1970). "S/Z" translated by Richard Miller, Blackwell Publishing.
2). A British one penny coin from 1903, which has been defaced by Suffragettes. Crown copyright.

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TAGS

1970 • codes of meaning • Comedie Humaine • criticismdifferancegenusHonore de Balzacideology • infinity of languages • languagelisable • lisible • literary criticismnarratology • opening of networks • ourselves writing • plasticised • plural • plurality • plurality of entrances • polysemouspolysemypost-structuralismreaderly textsRoland Barthes • S/Z • Sarrasine • scriptiblestructuralism • structuralist analysis • text • text of the story • the pastwriterly texts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2003

Readerly Texts and Writerly Texts

"Arising from work done during a seminar in the late 1960's, Roland Barthes's S/Z, which was first published in 1970, enacts a hypertextual reading of Honore de Balzac's short story, 'Sarrasine.' In S/Z, Barthes makes the distinction between readerly texts and writerly texts. The readerly text presents a smooth, linear reading where the reader is essentially passive. The writerly text, however, is nonlinear, made up of a infinite plurality of meanings and makes 'the reader no longer a consumer, but a producer of the text' (4). Translated from the French words, lisable and scriptable, the readerly and writerly texts delineate the distinction between 'classic' and modern works. As Barthes writes:'The writerly text is a perpetual present, upon which no consequent language (which would inevitable make it past) can be superimposed; the writerly text is ourselves writing, before the infinite play of the world (the world as function) is traversed, intersected, stopped, plasticized by some singular system (Ideology, Genus, Criticism) which reduces the plurality of entrances, the opening of networks, the infinity of languages'.Classic textuality (the readerly) is embodied in Balzac's 'Sarrasine,' and modern textuality (the writerly) is seen in Barthes's re–reading and re–writing of 'Sarrasine' in S/Z. Essentially through his reading of 'Sarrasine,' Barthes explodes the illusion of unity and wholeness that Balzac's tale presents. As Barthes writes, he 'interrupts' the text to 'star' it or cut it up in to (supposedly arbitrary) lexias or fragments. Each fragment is a 'space in which we can observe meanings' in their plurality. Hence each of these fragments constitutes a paper–version of hypertext. As Barthes writes: In this ideal text, the networks are many and interact, without any one of them being able to surpass the rest; this text is a galaxy of signifiers, not a structure of signifieds; it has no beginning; it is reversible; we gain access to it be several entrances, none of which can be authoritatively declared to be the main one; the codes it mobilizes extend as far as the eye can reach, they are indeterminable. . .based as it is on the infinity of language."
(Angela Mitchell, English Department at the University of Georgia)

1). Roland Barthes (1975). 'S/Z'. London, Jonathan Cape.

TAGS

Angela Mitchell • hypertext • intersected • lisableneologismnonlinearplasticisedpluralityreaderly textsRoland Barthesscriptible • stopped • traversed • UGA • University of Georgia • writerly texts
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