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Which clippings match 'Sol LeWitt' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 MAY 2015

Six years: the dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972

"Lippard was a primary critic and theorist of Conceptual art; this book, however, provides not commentary but, instead, primary documentation. It takes the form of an annotated, thematic timeline: the chapters list books (including exhibition catalogs) published each year, followed by articles, statements, activities, and works arranged by month. Photographs illustrate selected works. The annotations are, for the most part, as documentary as possible (transcripts, excerpts of artists' statements, etc.). Lippard's editorial hand is most visible in her inclusions and exclusions; less so in her only occasional textual insertions. As such, the book performs as Lippard had envisioned: 'to expose the chaotic network of ideas in the air, in America and abroad, between 1966 and 1971' (5)."

Lucy Lippard (1973). "Six years: the dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972; a cross-reference book of information on some esthetic boundaries". New York: Praeger.

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1973 • Adrian Piper • Agnes Denes • Alighiero Boetti • Allan Kaprow • Allen Ruppersberg • annotationsart objectArt-Language • arte povera • Athena Tacha Spear • Barry Flanagan • Barry Le Va • Bas Jan Ader • Bernar Venet • Bruce McLean • Bruce Nauman • Carl Andre • Catherine Morris • chaotic network of ideas • Charles Harrison • Christine Kozlov • chronology • Claes Oldenburg • conceptual artcontemporary art • Dan Graham • Daniel Buren • David Askevold • dematerialisation of the art object • Dennis Adrian • Dennis Oppenheim • digital art production • Donald Burgy • Douglas Huebler • earth art • Edward Ruscha • Eldritch Priest • Eleanor Antin • ephemeral art • Franz Erhard Walther • Franz Walther • Frederick Barthelme • Gerald Ferguson • Gerry Schum • Gilbert and George • Guerrilla Art Action Group • Hanne Darboven • Hans Haacke • Ian Burn • Ian Wilson • idea art • immateriality • information art • Jack Burnham • James Lee Byars • Jan Dibbets • John Baldessari • John Latham • Joseph BeuysJoseph Kosuth • Keith Arnatt • Keith Sonnier • La Monte Young • land art • Lawrence Weiner • Lee Lozano • Lucy Lippard • material concerns • materiality of artefacts • Mel Bochner • Mel Ramsden • Michael Asher • Michael Heizer • Michael Snow • Michelangelo Pistoletto • minimal art • N.E. Thing Co. • object art • On Kawara • performance art • Peter Downsbrough • Peter Hutchinson • post-conceptual • post-conceptual art • post-conceptualism • postconceptual • postconceptualism • provocative book • Rafael Ferrer • Richard Artschwager • Richard Long • Richard Serra • Robert Barry • Robert Morris • Robert Ryman • Robert SmithsonSeth SiegelaubSigmar PolkeSol LeWitt • Stanley Brouwn • Stephen Kaltenbach • Tony Smith • Victor Burgin • video art movements • Vincent Bonin • Vito Acconci • Walter de Maria • William Wegman • William Wiley • Willoughby Sharp • Wolf Vostell • Yoko Ono

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 FEBRUARY 2015

Smithsonian Libraries Artists' Books Collection Online

"Artists' books are works of art, like paintings or sculptures, but in book form. While book illustration has a much longer history, the book as art object is a product of the 20th century. Some of the early examples were created by Futurists and Dadaists in their politically–motivated pamphlets and magazines, by Fluxus artists in their happenings, and by conceptual artists' in their work to dematerialize the art object. Artists' books can also be unique creations undertaken with extreme care and attention to detail. Some are experimental and done by artists better known as painters or sculptors, as a way to extend their artistic practice. Many artists use the book format to create narratives to deal with difficult issues, with ideas that cannot be conveyed as clearly on a canvas or other medium. Some artist–made books illustrate the words of others, integrating art and literature. And some artists' books do not have words at all. As a work created by an artist, the nature, appearance and purpose, of an artist's book can be fundamentally different from what one might find on the shelves of the library.

Artists' books exist at the intersections of printmaking, photography, poetry, experimental narrative, visual arts, graphic design, and publishing. They have made a place for themselves in the collections of museums, libraries, and private collectors. They have caught the interest of art historians and critics writing about art, and there are numerous studio programs in art schools dedicated to the art of the book, ushering in new generations of artists making books."

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20th century • art and literature • art object • artist-made books • artists books • artists making books • Barbara Krugerbook formbook formatbook publishing • cataloguer • cataloguing challenge • Claire Van Vliet • Cooper Hewitt Library • cross-institution collaboration • culture onlineDada • defy easy classification • Dibner Library • diorama • Ed Ruscha • experimental books • FluxusFuturism (art movement) • Georges Adeagbo • graphic designhappenings • Hirshhorn Museum • Ida Applebroog • illustrating the words of others • Joe Freedman • Julie Chen • Kara Walker • Laura Davidson • library catalogue • Luan Nel • museum collectionsnational cultural heritage online • National Museum of African Art • National Portrait Gallery Library • online resource • pamphlets • paper engineering • photographypoetry • politically motivated • pop-up booksprintmaking • Smithsonian American Art Museum • Smithsonian Design Library • Smithsonian LibrariesSol LeWitt • the art of the book • Thomas Parker Williams • unusual physical features • Virginia Flynn • visual arts • Warren M Robbins Library • William Kentridgeworks of artYoko Ono

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 AUGUST 2012

Touch me, hold me: Franz West's anti-modernist aesthetic

"'Don't Touch' is an unspoken warning in any art museum. Sometimes an institution might post a sign explaining to visitors why touching the art on view is bad – not just for the obvious catastrophic reasons, but because even oils from hands that appear to be clean can cause incremental damage. Mostly, though, visitors already know what they are (or, rather, aren't) supposed to do in art's presence.

Touch is a privilege typically reserved for the artist who made the art, as well as its professional caretakers. In fact, 'the artist's touch' has been a central value in Western art for hundreds of years.

By the start of the 1960s, with the Abstract Expressionist generation of American painters riding high, it had even become something of a fetish. The loaded brush, the whiplash line, poured paint, the palette knife and sponge – signs of distinctive gestures mattered, almost like handwriting. De–mythologizing the artist's touch was left to Andy Warhol, who announced that he instead wanted to be a machine, and to Sol LeWitt and his idea–oriented cohort of Conceptual artists. They pulled the plug for good.

Enter Franz West, the impish Viennese artist whose compelling retrospective is at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Born in 1947, West is a generation younger than Warhol and LeWitt. The fetish for the artist's touch having been retired just before he arrived on the scene, he took the next step. In the mid–1970s, West handed things over to the audience.

Literally.

Wrapping pieces of wood and cardboard and lengths of wire with gauze, coating it in plaster or papier mâché and painting the whole thing white, West made sculptures that the audience was meant to pick up, manipulate, examine at close range, hang on an arm or around the neck, or even stick one's face into. The shapes are abstract. But often, part of the sculpture suggests a handle – a direct visual invitation to audience participation. Silently it says, Touch me, hold me.

Other shapes appear designed to fit around the neck, under the arm or on other embraceable parts of the body. Or, they echo bodily orifices. (Can a sculpture have a belly button?) A glass bottle at the end of a long stick, both embedded in lumpy papier mâché, looks like a ritual implement meant to be passed around in some primitive religious ceremony.

These materials also evoke the damaged condition art holds in contemporary life. Like a cast made for a broken limb, white plaster and gauze result in sculptures bound in a medical dressing.

West calls these sculptures 'Passstücke' –– originally translated as 'fitting pieces' (passende Stücke) but now referred to as 'adaptives.' In biology, adaptation is a structure or form modified to fit a changing environment. West's touch–me sculptures attempted the same for art's new circumstance."

(Los Angeles Times, 31 March 2009)

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2009 • Abstract Expressionist • adaptives (art) • affordancesAndy Warhol • anti-modernist aesthetic • artart museumartist • arts new circumstance • audienceAustrian artistcleanlinessconceptual art • dont touch • examine • Franz West • handlehold me • incremental damage • instructions for use • LACMA • loaded brush • Los Angeles County Museum of ArtLos Angeles Times • manipulate • mid-1970s • paper macheparticipationparticipatory process • passende stucke • passstucke • pick up • ritual implement • sculptorsculptureSol LeWitt • the artists touch • touchtouch me • touching • visual invitation • warning • western art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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