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Which clippings match 'Radar' keyword pg.1 of 1
07 JUNE 2015

Project Soli: control electronic devices without physical contact

"Google has unveiled an interaction sensor that uses radar to translate subtle hand movements into gesture controls for electronic devices, with the potential to transform the way they're designed (+ movie).

Project Soli was one of the developments revealed by Google's Advanced Technology and Progress (ATAP) group during the company's I/O developer conference in San Francisco last week. The team has created a tiny sensor that fits onto a chip. The sensor is able to track sub-millimetre hand gestures at high speed and accuracy with radar, and use them to control electronic devices without physical contact."

(2 June 2015, Dezeen)

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TAGS

2015Dezeen • dial • digital controls • electronic devices • future interfaces • gesture controls • gesture deviceGoogle Advanced Technology and Projects group (ATAP) • hand gestures • haptic device • haptic feedback • haptic interfacehuman-computer interactioninput device • interaction sensor • intuitive interface • Ivan Poupyrev • knobs • Leap Motion Controllermanipulate things • motion detection • motion tracking • movement detection • pliabilityprecision • Project Soli • radar • radio frequency • rubbing • sensorspatial interaction • sub-millimetre accuracy • subtle hand movements • swiping gesturetracking • turning a dial • virtual dial • wearable computing • wearables • without physical contact • working with our hands

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JUNE 2013

The Senster: pioneering cybernetic sculpture

"The Senster, commissioned by the electronics giant, Philips, for their permanent showplace, the Evoluon, in Eindhoven, was a much bigger and more ambitious piece of work than SAM. In addition to responding to people's voices, the Senster also responded to their movements, which it detected by means of radar, and was (as far as I know) the first robotic sculpture to be controlled by a computer. It was unveiled in 1970 and remained on permanent show until 1974 when it was dismantled.

Its size – it was over 15 feet (4 m) long and could reach as high into the air – made the use of aluminium castings inappropriate, so it was welded out of steel tubing, with the castings employed only in the more intricate microphone positioning mechanism. Its behaviour, controlled by a computer, was much more subtle than SAM's but still fairly simple. The microphones would locate the direction of any predominant sound and home in on it, rather like SAM but much more efficiently, and the rest of the structure would follow them in stages if the sound persisted. Sudden movements or loud noises would make it shy away. The complicated acoustics of the hall and the completely unpredictable behaviour of the public made the Senster's movements seem a lot more sophisticated than they actually were. It soon became obvious that it was that behaviour and not anything in its appearance which was responsble for the impact which the Senster undoubtedly had on the audience."

(Aleksandar Zivanovic)

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TAGS

1970acousticsart + technologyartificial intelligenceartificial life • audio activated • audio controlledautomata • computer controlled • computer historycomputer sculpturecybernetic art • cybernetic sculpture • Cybernetic Serendipitycybernetics • direction detection • Edward Ihnatowicz • Eindhoven • futuristic machineshanging mobileinteractive artinteractive toykinetic artkinetic sculpturemechanical beingmechanismmovementPhilipsradarrobotroboticrobotic sculpturerobotics • SAM (Sound Activated Mobile) • sculptureshow (spectacle)simulation • sound activated • sound sculpturespeculative design • The Senster • wonderment

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JANUARY 2013

Flightradar24.com: live air traffic tracker

"Flightradar24 is a flight tracking service that provides you with real–time info about thousands of aircraft around the world. ... [It] started as a hobby project in 2006 when two Swedish aviation geeks decided to build a network of ADS–B receivers in Northern and Central Europe. In 2009 we opened up the network, and made it possible for anyone with an ADS–B receiver to upload data to the network. Many parts of the world were quickly covered, but the quest to provide global ADS–B coverage is still ongoing. Hopefully with your support, we will get there."

(Flightradar24 AB, 2013)

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TAGS

2006 • ADS-B • ADS-B data • ADS-B receivers • ADS-B transponder • aeroplaneair trafficaircraft • airspace • Android OS • aviation • datadata visualisation • FAA • Federal Aviation Administration • flight • flight tracking • flight tracking service • flight-path • Flightradar24 • graphic representationinformation cartographyiOS • Mac OS • mapmappingpassenger aircraftradarreal-timeservicetrafficvisuo-spatial structuring of information • Windows 8

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2009

Sound Mirrors: dead-end technology

"Pioneered by the obsessive Dr W.S. Tucker of the Royal Engineers, the concrete sound mirrors were intended to provide early warning of incoming enemy aeroplanes and airships about to attack coastal towns.

But with the development of faster aircraft and the increasing racket from the holiday resort down the road, the effectiveness of the mirrors twindled as an aircraft would be within sight by the time it had been located. The last nail was finally driven into the coffin of this uniquely English folly by the evolution of radar systems, so by 1934 they had tragically became obsolete."

(David Barrington, 04.07.2006)

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19161930s1934 • acoustic mirrors • aeroplaneaircraft • airships • architectureconcretedead-end technology • early warning • engineeringEnglandenvironmentindustrial archaeologyindustrial designlistening earsmilitary complexmilitary hardwaremirrornational securityobsolescenceobsolete technologyradar • Royal Engineers • sound mirror • techno-scientifictechnologyUK • W.S. Tucker • World War IWW1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2005

Botfighter: Virtual Shoot-em-ups Via SMS

Krystian Woznicki & Gerrit Gohlke
Pervasive Gaming" is the catchword that "It's Alive Mobile Games AG," a partner of Ericsson, among others, wants to use to market games that surround the players in the public space, "24 hours, everywhere." "Botfighter," for example, is "encompassing, always present." It is a combination of an action and a role game that translates a virtual games community into real space. The concept of the game is simple: the players who are logged–in "shoot" at one another with their mobile telephones, with the provider's server acting as an information basis, a contract partner for virtual mercenary commissions, and a location system. The mobile location system decides whether one's opponent is within firing range or not. SMS queries allow players to locate the "targets" in space, travel to them, and attack them with "fire SMS" within the limits of the firing range. "The damage inflicted," 'It's alive' informs us, "depends on the type of simulated weapon used, the effectiveness of the enemy's defence shields, and other pre–determined factors." The telephone as radar and firing device. The battleground as a conspirative network.

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TAGS

attack • Botfighter • firing device • mobilepervasive gamingradar • shoot • SMSspacevirtualweapon
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