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Which clippings match 'Queensland' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 MAY 2015

Brisbane back from the future

"Have you ever wondered what Brisbane looked like before white settlement? Have you ever wanted to know what's under all that concrete? Brisbanite Brett Leavy can help with that, as he develops a role-playing game (RPG) that simulates the lives of the tribes that once populated our city.

His game will use topographical data and 3D modelling to allow you to explore almost photo-realistic simulations of the CBD, South Bank, West End, Fortitude Valley, Bowen Hills, Woolloongabba and other Brisbane suburbs as they appeared before white settlement.

He recently demonstrated the game at the launch of the PIVOTAL Summit, which will bring together world leaders in spatial information technology, sustainability, climate change and governance in Brisbane next month."

(Rohan Williams, 11 May, 2015, bmag)

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TAGS

1855 • 2015Aboriginal peopleancient traditionsAustraliaBrett LeavyBrisbanecultural heritage • Dundalli (character) • historical reenactment • hunting and gathering • immersive heritage experienceIndigenous cultural knowledgeindigenous historyindigenous landscapesIndigenous people • indigenous warrior • interactive immersive simulation experiencelandscape • local tribes • photorealistic simulation • PIVOTAL Summit • QueenslandQUT Cube Projectsrole-playing game (RPG)settlementsimulated environment • spatial information technology • survival storytopographical datavirtual experiencevirtual reality projectvirtual recreationwhite settlement

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 AUGUST 2014

Hot Modernism: mid-twentieth-century Queensland architecture

Exhibition: "Hot Modernism: Building modern Queensland 1945–75", 9 July – 12 October 2014. State Library of Queensland, Cultural Precinct South Bank, Brisbane, Australia.

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1960s2014architecture • Barry Walduck • better ways of living • Brisbanebuilding • building design • Carina • Central Technical College • colour field • custodian • deck • design idealsdesign traditionsdining room • domestic architecture • Eisenmenger House • elevated house • exhibition • international flavour • International Stylekitchen • local practices • mass production ideals • mid-centurymid-century designmodernismmodernist aestheticsmodernist architecture • modernist art • new approachesnew approaches to design • new architecture • open-plan lounge • poolpost-war architectureQueenslandquestioning traditionssimplified forms • simplified lines • State Library of Queensland • subtropical climate • timber house • traditional building • tropical climate • use of colour • veranda • visual style

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 APRIL 2011

Australian youth advice website: Get Out There!

"Get out there is the Queensland government's youth website. The website is designed to help young consumers tackle some of the big issues affecting their life during and after high school. It features practical advice and tips from a number of government agencies and organisations. It includes information on: budgeting, buying a mobile phone, enrolling to vote, renting, enrolling in a university degree or TAFE course, finding a job, joining a sporting club and schoolies."

(Queensland Government Office of Fair Trading, 2011)

Fig.2 http://getoutthere.qld.gov.au/ website

Fig.3 Department of Justice and Attorney–General (8 April 2011). 'Youth urged to take care online'

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2011Australia • budgeting • commodityempowerment • enrolling to vote • finding a job • game • Get Out There! • high schoolinformationinteractiveisometric projectionmobile phone • Office of Fair Trading • OFT • practical adviceQueensland • Queensland Government • renting • schoolies • sports club • TAFE • TAFE course • The Sims (2000)tipsuniversityuniversity enrolmentwebsite • young consumers • youth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 APRIL 2011

The History of Instant Runoff Voting ('Alternative Vote' in Australia)

"The key the to the development of instant runoff voting (IRV) was the invention of the single transferable vote (STV) in the 1850's by Thomas Hare in England and Carl Andrae in Denmark. The essence of STV is the concept that a citizen would have one vote in a particular contest, but that that vote might be transferred from one candidate to another according to each voter's ranking of candidates, depending on the aggregate result of other voters' ballots. Hare devised this balloting and counting procedure in creating a system of proportional representation.

IRV, however, is not a system of proportional representation. Instead, IRV uses the STV innovation in a winner–take–all context. Instant runoff voting, using a preference ballot, was invented by an American, W. R. Ware, a Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, around 1870. The first known use of IRV in a governmental election was in 1893 in Queensland, Australia. However, this was a modified version of IRV in which all candidates except the top two were eliminated in a batch rather than sequentially, as in the pure form of IRV. The 'staggered runoff' concept that we understand today as IRV was first used in Western Australia in 1908.

IRV, called 'alternative vote' in Australia, came to be used in most Australian legislative elections, although it was superseded by Hare's STV system of proportional representation for the federal Senate. IRV is still used for electing members of the lower house. IRV is also used in other nations, such as Ireland. In the United Kingdom, the Jenkins Commission, appointed by the new government, released their report October 29 that recommends the use of IRV for electing the House of Commons (with proportional representation achieved through the election of additional members based on the popular vote for parties nationally). ...

The single transferable vote is a more common voting procedure in the U.S. than most of us realize. Even the Academy Awards uses STV in determining their finalists. The American Political Science Association (APSA), the organization of political science professors, uses IRV to elect their national president, since political scientists understand that IRV is the fairest and simplest way to elect a single winner from a field of candidates."

(Center for Voting and Democracy, Washington, D.C.)

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1850s1893advocacyAlternative Vote • American Political Science Association • APSA • Australia • Australian Federal Senate • Australian Lower House • Carl Andrae • contest • counting procedure • Denmark • election • fairnessHouse of CommonsInstant Runoff VotingIRV • Jenkins Commission • legislative elections • Massachusetts Institute of TechnologymisrepresentationParliamentpolicypolitical representationpolitical sciencepoliticspopular vote • preference ballot • proportional representation • QueenslandrankingRepublic of Irelandsimplicity • Single Transferable Vote • single winner • STV • systemThomas HaretransferUKvotingvoting system • W. R. Ware

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 NOVEMBER 2008

The Global Reach of a New Discourse: How Far Can 'Creative Industries' Travel?

"A successful creative industries sector is highly dependent upon the socio–economic opportunities opened up for the 'organic, bottom–up development' of small enterprises characterised by 'flat hierarchy and project–based work patterns' and the clustering of autonomous, risk taking, and avant–garde freelance producers who specialise, among other things, in the post–broadcast media content production (Oakley, 77; Hartley and Cunningham, ??). We can hardly miss the sine qua non for the sector in those various definitions , i.e., a (free) market economy which takes competition, intellectual property rights, and most importantly, a commercialised culture industries sector, as givens."
(Jing Wang)

TAGS

2002bottom-upclusterconsumptioncreative industries • culture industries • discourse • flat hierarchy • free market economyfreelanceglobalisationJohn HartleymediaMITnew economyPeoples Republic of Chinapolicy • policy studies • post-broadcast media • projectQueenslandQUTriskStuart Cunningham • Wang

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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