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Which clippings match 'Prototyping' keyword pg.1 of 4
25 NOVEMBER 2013

DesFi (Design Fictions) MA study at QUT

"I use the term 'DesFi' as a play on 'SciFi'. In that 'SciFi' narratives and visualisations are fictional scenarios based on scientific discoveries and discussions. Im particularly interested in how the genre of 'science fiction' can provide an example approach for design students to consider when they are conceptualising potential designs for future contexts.

The DesFi approach allows design students to put aside existing limitations… such as current issues around voice recognition, language translators or even access to personal data. These limitations are based in technical, political and sometimes ethical arguments that, although undeniably critical to design feasibility, can suspend design innovations if we only consider the policies, technologies and processes that exist right now.

My premise to the students is that such contemporary concerns may be solved by another discipline in the near or far future. Consequently, attitudes will shift, new technologies will emerge and the criteria and inventory for design specifications will change.

Limiting our design ideas to current issues may dilute the potential for innovation… but more importantly, by prototyping great imaginative design solutions, we can increase the demand for change through demonstrating the possibilities that emerge from overcoming the conditions and contingencies of designing products for only todays market and todays user."

(Deb Polson, 25 November 2013)

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TAGS

2009AustraliaBruce Sterlingcommunication design education • contemporary concerns • Debra Polson • DesFi • DesFi prototypes • DesFi tangents • design educators • design feasibility • design fictions • Design Fictions (course) • design innovation • design specifications • design students • design studio programme • designing products • designing prototypes • diegetic prototypes • ethical arguments • fantasticfictional scenariosfuture contextshistory of ideasimaginative design solutions • Interactive and Visual Design Course • Julian BleeckerMA • Masters of Creative Industries • near future design • new technologies • potential designs • prototypingQUTsci-fiscience fictionscientific discoveriesscientific observationsspeculative designsuspend disbeliefwhat if

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2013

Design Fiction, Science Fiction and Literary Criticism

"Design Fiction is a recent spin–off of Science Fiction, directly inspired by many of the imagined worlds of writers like Bruce Sterling, William Gibson, J.G. Ballard and others. It sets out to do many of the same things as Sci–Fi does, but in a more concrete way, by introducing real physical objects or real sets of rules and scenarios which require the participation (direct or indirect, voluntary or involuntary) of users, beyond just their emotional and intellectual engagement. In this way Design Fiction can 'test' objects or tools or storylines that Science Fiction, until recently, has not been able to. A literary work, has (in general) been a fixed text until very recently, and so even though readers have enjoyed many different readings and interpretations, the author has not been able to adapt or react to their responses. Design Fiction allows the inventor or storytellers to adapt their scenario as it evolves and as the users or participants give their reactions."

(Charles Beckett, How to Think About The Future)

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TAGS

alternative possible futures • Bruce Sterling • conscious metaphor • design fictiondigital technologyfictional setting • future speculation • future technologiesfuturologyInanimate AliceJ G Ballard • Jake Dugarden • Julian Bleeckerliterary criticismMichio Kaku • nascent practice • Near Future Laboratory • PerplexCity (project) • Philip K. Dickphilosophical questionsPhysics of the Impossible (2008)prototypingSascha Pohfleppsci-fi • sci-fi science • science fictionspeculative designspeculative physicsspeculative prototypesStar TrekStar Warstest concepts • test out • test your ideas • what-if scenarios • William Gibson • World Without Oil (project)

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
22 OCTOBER 2013

Project Management and Business Analysis Guides

"The Project Service Centre (PSC) role within CSU is to establish sound Project Management (PM) principles throughout the organisation. This will provide a means of clearly identifying the true needs of the University and help facilitate those desired outcomes.

To achieve these objectives, the PSC must provide and enhance the methodology for project management and business analysis, including guides and templates. This particular section concentrates on a set of guides which recommends how different processes can be undertaken."

(Charles Sturt University)

TAGS

enefits analysis • brainstormingbusiness analysisbusiness analystbusiness communicationbusiness logicbusiness management • business process modelling • Charles Sturt University • conducting meetings • cost estimatedecision makingdocument analysis • echnical specification • elicitation practices • elicitation process • engineering process • financial analysis • focus group • functional decomposition • gathering requirements • interface analysis • interviewingmodelling and prototyping • needs analysis • PowerPoint lectureproblem-solvingproject managementprototypingquestionnaire • requirements analysis • requirements elicitationrequirements engineeringrequirements gatheringrequirements process • requirements workshop • reverse engineeringrole playingshared practicessoftware engineering • stakeholder interviews • surveysystem requirementsuse casesuser activity data • user observation • workshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2013

Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design: Prototyping

"As design–led and practice–based research institution, CIID has expertise in directly engaging with design and technological materials to produce prototypes. Prototyping is at the center of CIID's design culture; it provides us with the methods and means to probe future scenarios, situate design discourses and test design and technical implementations in real world contexts. Our prototyping methods range from simple paper based co–creation props to functional physical prototypes of complex systems. In addition, video scenarios and various experience prototyping methods are employed, in the early stages of our research, in order to bring forward surprisingly foundational insights about the 'role' a technological object or system may have in the real world. Overall, insights derived from all prototypes feed back into our research process to re–iterate over its concepts or focus. With clear probing or prompting goals, we can better use sketches in materials, hardware and software to think and communicate about research, technologies and their societal impacts."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2013

Design Prototypes as Boundary Objects in Innovation Processes

"In our paper we focus on how design prototypes can foster communications in organizations that deal with the development of innovations. We distinguish the impact of prototypes between two different organizational levels; we first conduct the impact of prototypes at the level of organizational design teams that develop ideas and concepts for solutions. We then focus on the impact of prototypes on the level of organizational teams and departments that have not been part of the initial design phase but are responsible for further developments in the innovation process, e.g. production, financing, and marketing.

Previous research has indicated that prototypes have a significant influence on both organizational levels. Prototypes, in the best cases, can become so–called boundary objects between different domains and stakeholders and may deliver positive effects within the innovation process. However, the successful management of stakeholders in this context remains highly challenging. In this paper we want to address these difficulties as well as the current state of research in this field. We propose that a prototype does not only stand for an important design technique but should moreover be regarded as a management tool that can be integrated into a structured dialogue between stakeholders. We provide first insights on what a structured dialogue, based on prototypes, can mean and what it thereby should imply. We will synthesize prior research findings and begin to develop a concept on how to utilize prototypes as boundary objects from a management perspective."

(Holger Rhinow, Eva Köppen and Christoph Meinel, 2012)

Holger Rhinow, Eva Köppen, and Christoph Meinel: "Prototypes as Boundary Objects in Innovation Processes". Conference Paper in the Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Design Research Society (DRS 2012), Bangkok, Thailand, July 2012

TAGS

2012 • between domains • between stakeholders • boundary objects • Christoph Meinel • design concepts • design phase • design prototypesdesign solutionsdesign teams • develop ideas • Eva Koppen • financing • first insights • foster communication • Holger Rhinow • impact of prototypes • innovationinnovation process • innovation processes • International Conference on Design Research Society • management perspective • marketing process • organisational designorganisational teamspositive effectsproduction processprototype • prototypes • prototyping • stakeholder management • structured dialogue

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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