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Which clippings match 'Cultural Appropriation' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 JANUARY 2013

The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

"The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts is the country's [USA] leading museum for exhibiting, collecting and interpreting the most progressive work of contemporary Native artists for local, national and international audiences. MoCNA is a venue for exhibitions of artists who merit, local, national and international recognition. The Museum belongs at the forefront of contemporary Native art presentation and strives to be flexible, foresighted and risk–taking in its exhibitions and programs."

(MoCNA)

Richard Glazer–Danay, Jan, 2012, "Shake, Rattle & Roll", Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, [http://www.iaia.edu/museum/exhibition/shake–rattle–roll/].

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TAGS

1962 • American Indian • art museumartworkscontemporary art • contemporary Native artists • cultural appropriation • cultural discourse • cultural identitycultural interpretations • cultural programme • exhibiting artists • folk museumfostering discourse • IAIA • indigenous artIndigenous people • Institute of American Indian Arts • international audiences • MoCNA • museummuseum of contemporary culture • Museum of Contemporary Native Arts • National Collection of Contemporary Native Art • national cultural identitiesNative Americans • Native art • Native artists • New Mexico • North America • progressive work • sacred • Santa Fe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Hannah Starkey: reconstructed scenes from everyday life

"Using actors within carefully considered settings, Hannah Starkey's photographs reconstruct scenes from everyday life with the concentrated stylisation of film. Starkey's images picture women engaged in regular routines such as loitering in the street, sitting in cafes, or passively shopping. Starkey captures these generic 'in between' moments of daily life with a sense of relational detachment. Her still images operate as discomforting 'pauses'; where the banality of existence is freeze–framed in crisis point, creating reflective instances of inner contemplation, isolation, and conflicting emotion.

Through the staging of her scenes, Starkey's images evoke suggestive narratives through their appropriation of cultural templates: issues of class, race, gender, and identity are implied through the physical appearance of her models or places. Adopting the devices of filmography, Starkey's images are intensified with a pervasive voyeuristic intrusion, framing moments of intimacy for unapologetic consumption. Starkey often uses composition to heighten this sense of personal and emotional disconnection, with arrangements of lone figures separated from a group, or segregated with metaphoric physical divides such as tables or mirrors.

Often titling her work as Untitled, followed by a generalised date of creation, her photographs parallel the interconnected vagueness of memory, recalling suggestions of events and emotions without fixed location or context. Her work presents a platform where fiction and reality are blurred, illustrating the gap between personal fragility and social construction, and merging the experiences of strangers with our own."

(Saatchi Gallery)

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TAGS

artificeawkwardnessbanalitycinematic conventionscultural appropriationcultural signals • cultural templates • daily lifedetachmentemotionlesseveryday life • fiction and reality • film stylisationframed momentsfreeze frame • Hannah Starkey • in-betweenin-between narratives • inner contemplation • intimacyintrospectionisolation • loitering • momentsnarrative photographynarrative scenesobservationpausephotographyplaceness • regular routines • routineSaatchi Galleryscene reconstructionsettingstagingstylisedsuggestive narrativesvignette • voyeuristic intrusion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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