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Which clippings match 'Prosthesis' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 JUNE 2014

REX: independent mobility through hands-free robotic exoskeleton

"Rex Bionics Plc (The Rex Bionics Group) is the global technology leader in robotic exoskeletons (REX). Uniquely, REX® provides independent mobility to wheelchair users and other mobility impaired persons using advanced robotic technology, custom–designed electromechanical actuators, precision engineering, and specialised networking systems.

The key differentiator of REX is the fact that it has been designed from the outset to provide mobility to non–ambulatory wheelchair users rather than as a means to enable otherwise fit individuals to lift supra–physiological loads, enhance endurance or aid mobility of those able to walk with crutches.

The device is designed to enable all users to stand and walk, and REX Personal™ users to scale stairs and navigate slopes."

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TAGS

ambulatory disability • Aotearoa New Zealandapplied researchartificial limbbionicsbodycyborgdesign for disabilitydisability • electromechanical actuators • engineeringexoskeletonfuturistic machines • hands-free robotic exoskeleton • human body • independent mobility • intimate interfaceskiwi ingenuitylegslocomotionman machinemechanical engineeringmitigating impairmentmobility • mobility aid • mobility impaired • movingnew ways of being • paraplegic • physical engagementphysiologyproduct designprosthesisprosthetic leg • REX • Rex Bionics • Rex Bionics Group • Rex Bionics Plc • Richard Little • Robert Irving • robotic exoskeleton • robotic systemsrobotic technologyrobotics • Sophie Morgan • spinal cord injury • supraphysiological • thoracic vertebrae • walk • walkingwalking machine • wheelchair users

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Metamedia at Stanford

"Metamedia ia a studio and lab that pursues research and pedagogy in design history and media materialities.

It is located online, in Stanford Archaeology Center, and has worldwide affiliates.

Metamedia combines archaeology and media, with an archaeological and long–term focus on how people get on with things, with media(works) treated as modes of engagement between people and things. Media as artifacts and prostheses as well as systems to convey meaning: we emphasize the materialities of mediation at the heart of design – the way the steel was burnished, the clay was turned, how the vessel connects makers and materials, users and contents in genealogies of containment, portage, representation ... whatever work gets done."

TAGS

archaeological media lab • archaeological sensibility • archaeological view • archaeology • archaeology and media • archiveartefactsbetween people and things • constantly revisiting the past • contemporary experience • designdesign history • genealogies of containment • historicity • how people get on with things • makers and materials • material modalities • material modes of engagementmaterialitiesmaterialitymeaning making • media materialities • media works • mediationmemory • Metamedia (archaeological media lab) • modes of engagement • portage • prosthesis • re-presentation • re-presenting • research lab • reworking • sense of history • Stanford Archaeology Center • Stanford Universitythe pastthingstraces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MARCH 2011

Pina Bausch: dance, dance otherwise we are lost

"There are deep noises of gallops. The brown earth covering the floor reveals hundreds of tracks of wild animals in stampede. But instead, it is a set of dancers what appears on scene. Their presence is heavily felt through their turbulent footprints. The Rite of Spring is one of Pina Bausch's most celebrated choreographic pieces, included in the homage documentary PINA that Wim Wenders has just presented. A movie about the sign that her teachings on performative space left before her death in 2009: the Dance Theatre genre.

In her choreographies, earth is heavy. Flying dust materializes air. The void weighs. Water drops densify the emptiness. Living bodies become inert corpses. A closed–eyed dancer lets her mass fall down until the trust on her partner saves her from a mortal knock. Hands and feet become detachable prosthesis. The lightness of matter clashes over the presence of the ephemeral. Optical illusions...

In Choreographed Environments, Eva Pérez de Vega points out that 'considering immaterial effects in the production of a material practice, is not at all about ignoring the material per se. It refers more to the conception of a material production. It is about thinking how to make immaterial notions material; ultimately it is about creating material effects. [...] Architecture no longer consists of making building and Dance no longer consists of making dances. The hope is that as dancers continue to explore new territories as managers of space, architects too can conceive of space as managers of movement' (Eva Pérez de Vega, 2007, p.7).

For the movie, many pieces were performed again in unusual urban settings, such as inside and underneath Wuppertal's retrofuturistic sky–train, or inside other recent architectural iconic references (easy to guess!). Pina Bausch pioneered a strong performative approach to architecture and Wenders has made her pupils revive its immateriality in cult buildings for posterity: a clear effort to transmit Pina's philosophy of movement constructing space. Bravo!"

(via Daniel Fernández Pascual, Deconcrete, 16 February 2011)

1,2). Wim Wenders (2011). 'Pina', Germany.
3). Eva Pérez de Vega (2007). 'Choreographed Environments. A Performative Approach to Architecture', New York.

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TAGS

20092011architecture • choreographed environments • choreographer • choreographyconstructing spacedancedance theatredancerdocumentaryephemera • Eva Perez de Vega • figures in spacehomage • homo ludens • immateriality • invisible cities • making building • making dances • managers of space • material effectsmaterial practicematerial productionmovement • new territories • performative approach • performative space • philosophy of movement • Pina Bausch • pioneeringposterityprosthesisretro-futuristic • Rite of Spring • sky-train • spacetableau vivant • unusual urban settings • urbanism • Wim Wenders • Wuppertal Schwebebahn

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 DECEMBER 2010

The Six Million Dollar Man: the evolution of an iconic title sequence

"The Six Million Dollar Man started off as a novel by [Martin Caidin] called Cyborg, but over the course of its development from book to movie to TV show, it not only changed name, it changed tone.

The book is essentially a thriller that tries to ground itself in reality as much as possible to make Steve Austin a super–spy. Sure he has a bionics left arm (yes, bionics in the book, not bionic), bionics legs and bionics eye. But he can't feel anything in his bionics limbs and his bionics eye won't let him see, only take pictures. And sure, he's very strong, but when he kicks a golf ball, that bionics toe of his still gets crushed by the impact.

It was bionics, but still tried to be relatively aware of the laws of physics and what was practical."

(The Medium is Not Enough TV blog, 9 July 2010)

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TAGS

197219741978accidentartificialartificial limbastronautaugmentationback story • biomechatronics • Bionic Womanbionicsbodycinematic conventionsconventionscorporeal augmentationcrashcyberneticscyborgexpositionhero • Lee Majors • Lindsay Wagner • Martin Caidinmasculinity • Oscar Goldman • pilot episodeprosthesisresurrectionsci-fisequence designSix Million Dollar ManspySteve Austinsurgerytelevisionthrillertitle sequenceTVvisual designvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MAY 2009

The Iron Hand of Götz Von Berlichingen

... in 1504 "centuries ahead of its time. The [prosthetic] iron hand not only allowed [Götz Von Berlichingen] to return to battle, but later helped lay the foundation for modern prosthetics. Complete with articulated fingers, spring action and an array of levers and buttons, the hand allowed a degree of control that's stunning even today."
(David Forbes, 12 March 2008 )

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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