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Which clippings match 'Propaganda' keyword pg.1 of 4
20 NOVEMBER 2014

The Pervert's Guide to Ideology

"Starting from the provocative premise that political and commercial regimes regard us as 'subjects of pleasure', controlling us by offering us enjoyment, director Sophie Fiennes and charismatic philosopher Slavoj Žižek repeat the formula of their 2006 collaboration, The Pervert's Guide to Cinema.

The quirky, genial Žižek employs cleverly chosen clips from a huge variety of movies – including Brazil, M*A*S*H, The Sound of Music, and Brief Encounter – to illustrate his fascinating monologue, frequently appearing on sets and in costumes which replicate scenes from the films in question. For example, dressed as a chubbier, bearded Travis Bickle, he expounds the darker subtexts of Taxi Driver's plot from within the anti–hero's grotty apartment. This entertaining approach helps to ensure that what might otherwise have been a dense, even daunting intellectual challenge is actually an engaging and unexpected delight."

(The Institute of Contemporary Arts)

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TAGS

2012 • A Brief Encounter (1945) • anxieties • atheism • bloodbath • Brazil (1985)capitalism • catholicism • cinematic fantasies • consumerism • critical interpretation • critique of ideology • cultural critic • cultural critique • cultural theorist • daisy-chained improvisations • desire • dissident • documentary filmenculturation • enjoyment • Ethel Sheperd • fatigues • fears • flights of fancy • hegemonic discourseheroiconography • ideological message • ideological systems • ideologies • ideology • If (1968) • impulse of capitalism • Jaws (1975) • Kinder Eggs • Lucy Von Lonkhuy • MASH (1970) • NaziNazi GermanyNazi propaganda filmsnews footageOccupy Wall Street • Ode to Joy • prevailing ideologies • promise of fulfillment • propagandapsychoanalysis • psychoanalyst • psychoanalytic critic • pursuit of enjoyment • Rammstein • readable experience • rebel • Seconds (1966) • secret message • simple pleasures • Slavoj Zizek • Slovene • Slovenian • Sophie Fiennes • Soviet Russiasubconscioussubtext • tacit understanding • Taxi Driver (1976) • The Dark Knight (2008) • The Fall of Berlin (1950) • The Last Temptation of Christ (1988) • the otherThe Perverts Guide to Ideology (2012) • The Searchers (1956) • The Sound of Music (1965)They Live (1988) • Titanic (1997) • Triumph of the Will (1935) • unconscious desires • underdog • unseen depths • villain • violent outsider • West Side Story (1961) • Zabriskie Point (1970)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 SEPTEMBER 2014

The now discredited hypodermic needle model of communication

"The Hypodermic Needle Theory is a linear communication theory which suggests that media messages are injected directly into the brains of a passive audience. It suggests that we're all the same and we all respond to media messages in the same way.

This way of thinking about communication and media influence is no longer really accepted. In the 1930s, many researchers realized the limitations of this idea and some dispute whether early media theorists gave the idea any serious attention at all. Nevertheless, The Hypodermic Needle Theory continues to influence the way we talk about the media. People believe that the mass media has a powerful effect. Parents worry about the influence of television and violent video games. News outlets run headlines like 'Is Google making us stupid' and 'Grand Theft Auto led teen to kill'."

(Brett Lamb, 12 April 2013)

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1930sArthur Bergerassumptions • attitudinal attributes • behaviour systemsbehaviourism • Bernard Berelson • biologically based theory • communication theoryconceptual model • David Croteau • Dennis Davis • discredited theory • Elihu Katz • Hadley Cantril • Hazel Gaudet • Herta Herzog • human instinct • human nature • hypodermic needle model • hypodermic needle theory • hypodermic-syringe model • infusion • injection • James Tankard • linear communication theory • magic bullet theory • mass communicationmedia • media gun • media influence • mental imagemessagemodel of communication • obsolete theory • passive audience • Paul Lazarsfeld • propaganda • shooting metaphor • sitting duck • situational attributes • Stanley Baran • theory of communication • transmission-belt model • unidirectional flow • uniformly controlled • Werner Severin • William Hoynes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JANUARY 2014

The emergence of living newspapers in the early twentieth century

"The roots of the 'living newspaper' in Europe can be traced to Italian futurism in the early decades of the twentieth century. It was in the young Soviet Union (and principally the Moscow Institute of Journalism), however, that it was developed into a recognisable form of agitprop theatre. Performed by small bands of propagandists, the scripts for zhivaya gazeta were often pasted together from materials found in newspapers–though a high degree of improvisation was also encouraged–and were designed to provide illiterate audiences (such as workers or Red Army recruits) with details of campaigns, battles or other newsworthy events (Casson, 2000). Plays were performed on street corners or in other public spaces, with the aid of a handful of props and simple yet highly symbolic costumes [2].

By the late 1920s, however, zhivaya gazeta were already being seen as passé by many dramatists in the Soviet Union, with all forms of 'revolutionary agitational art' becoming 'increasingly unwelcome', and official attention turning towards the development of more sophisticated forms of theatre in the lead up to the adoption of socialist realism as official state doctrine in 1932 (Frolova‐Walker, 2006: 185). Indeed, Stalin disbanded the Blue Blouse Group, the main exponent of zhivaya gazeta, in 1928 (Casson, 2000:109)."

(Jeremy Taylor. p.29)

[2] Top hats, for instance, were used with much frequency to mark out a particular character as being bourgeois (Tolstoy, 1998: 24).

Jeremy E.Taylor (2013). The Sinification of Soviet Agitational Theatre: 'Living Newspapers' in Mao's China, Journal of the British Association for Chinese Studies, Vol. 2 July 2013.

TAGS

agitational art • agitprop theatre • Blue Blouse Group • dramaturgyearly twentieth centuryFuturism (art movement) • huobaoju • illiterate audiences • improvisationinterventionist art • Jeremy Taylor • John Casson • Journal of the British Association for Chinese Studies • Leo Tolstoy • living newspaper • Marina Frolova-Walker • Moscow Institute of Journalism • newspapers • newsworthy events • pasted together • propaganda • propagandist • public spacesRed Army • revolutionary acts • revolutionary agitational art • socialist realismSoviet Union • state doctrine • street theatre • symbolic costumes • theatre form • theatre history • transformational narrative • yangbanxi • zhivaya gazeta

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2014

Energizing corporate culture through industrial musicals

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1950s1954aesthetic spectacleautomaker • awayday • boom time • business contextChevroletcollective values • company loyalty • corporate Americacorporate behaviourcorporate culturecorporate events • corporate image • corporate musical • economic boomenculturationenergizing corporate cultureentertainmentGeneral Motors • industrial musical • industrial propaganda • industrial show • industrial theatre • internal marketing • internal songbook • marketing practicesmusical theatreorganisational culturePrelinger Archivespromoting shared business contextpropagandasales and profitshow (spectacle) • song-and-dance • team day • team motivation • team-buildingtrade convention

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JUNE 2013

The Visual Telling of Stories: a collection of advertising images, magazine spreads and book illustrations

"The website of The Visual Telling of Stories aspires to being a Visual Lexicon, dedicated to the primacy of the Visual Proposition. Above all it tries to create an overall consistency of structure and environment, as if it was all taking place in one characteristic landscape through which you are allowed to wander. The main delight and challenge is the invention of non–linear means of navigation through spaces of knowledge with a created balance of reference and discovery."

(Chris Mullen)

Fig.1 Emile Allais, Roger Frison–Roche, et al. (1947). How to Ski by the French Method: Emile Allais, Technic. Preface by Frison–Roche. Photos and Layout by Pierre Boucher. Translated from the French by Agustin R. Edwards, Éditions Flèche [http://www.fulltable.com/vts/aoi/b/boucher/bc.htm].

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advertising imagesadvertising posters • Agustin Edwards • American dreambook designbook illustration • Chris Mullen • collected examples • cultural codescultural narrativesdesign and visual culture • Emile Allais • ephemeragraphic representationimage collectionlogocentricmagazine layoutmaterial culturemiscellaneousnewspaperspersonal cataloguepersonal collections • pictures tell stories • propaganda • Roger Frison-Roche • vintage advertisingvisual codesvisual communicationvisual culturevisual ephemera • visual lexicon • visual taxonomy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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