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Which clippings match 'Programming Language' keyword pg.1 of 2
03 JULY 2015

SuperCollider: real-time audio synthesis and algorithmic composition

"The language interpreter runs in a cross platform IDE (OS X/Linux/Windows) and communicates via Open Sound Control with one or more synthesis servers. The SuperCollider synthesis server runs in a separate process or even on a separate machine so it is ideal for realtime networked music.

SuperCollider was developed by James McCartney and originally released in 1996. He released it under the terms of the GNU General Public License in 2002 when he joined the Apple Core Audio team. It is now maintained and developed by an active and enthusiastic community. It is used by musicians, scientists, and artists working with sound."

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TAGS

1996 • acoustic research • algorithmic composition • algorithmic music • Apple Core Audio • authoring environmentcomputational designdevelopment environment • Devi Skanadze • electronic musicexperimental music • generative audio • generative musicGNU General Public LicenseIDE • interactive programming • James McCartney • language interpreter • LinuxOpen Sound ControlOSXprogramming environmentprogramming language • real-time audio synthesis • real-time generative music • real-time interaction • realtime networked music • rule-based worksonic arts • SuperCollider • synthesis server • Windows OS

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2013

Arduino can sense the environment by receiving input from a variety of sensors and can affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators

"Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. It's an open–source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board.

Arduino can be used to develop interactive objects, taking inputs from a variety of switches or sensors, and controlling a variety of lights, motors, and other physical outputs. Arduino projects can be stand–alone, or they can be communicate with software running on your computer (e.g. Flash, Processing, MaxMSP.) The boards can be assembled by hand or purchased preassembled; the open–source IDE can be downloaded for free.

The Arduino programming language is an implementation of Wiring, a similar physical computing platform, which is based on the Processing multimedia programming environment."

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32-bit • 8-bitAdobe Flash • Advanced RISC Machines (ARM) • Arduino • Arduino programming language • Atmel ARM • Atmel AVR • computing platform • controller • David Cuartielles • David Mellis • development environmentDIYelectronics • Gianluca Martino • IDEinput deviceinteractive objects • Massimo Banzi • Max (software)Max/MSPmicrocontrollermicrocontroller boardminimalist electronica • multimedia programming environment • open source platformopen-source hardwarephysical and digital interactionphysical computing • physical computing platform • physical worldpocket-sized circuit boardProcessing (software)programming languageprototyping platformsensor • Tom Igoe • Wiring (software library) • writing software

CONTRIBUTOR

Rob Canning
28 MARCH 2013

All students should have the opportunity to be creative with code

This is a useful initiative, despite its narrow focus on engineering and science. It would be great to see the companion film which profiles creative arts and design professionals who regularly use programming as part of their practice/work.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 SEPTEMBER 2011

Nina Wenhart's blog on the prehysteries of new media

"this blog is nina wenhart's collection of resources on the various histories of new media art. it consists mainly of non or very little edited material i found flaneuring on the net, sometimes with my own annotations and comments, sometimes it's also textparts i retyped from books that are out of print.

it is also meant to be an additional resource of information and recommended reading for my students of the prehystories of new media class that i teach at the school of the art institute of chicago in fall 2008.

the focus is on the time period from the beginning of the 20th century up to today."

(Nina Wenhart, 26/06/2008)

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20th centuryAlan Turingapplied researchARarchiveArs Electronicaart • art + science • art + technologyart of codeartificial intelligenceartificial life • artistic molecules • artistic practice • artistic software • artistsASCIIASCII-Artatom • atomium • audiofiles • augmented realityavant-gardebody • Cave Automated Virtual Environment (CAVE) • code art • cold warcollection • collection of resources • computercomputer animationcomputer graphicscomputer history • computer programming language • computer research • computer sculptureconcept artconceptual artconceptualisationconcrete poetry • copy-it-right • creative practicecritical theorycross-disciplinaryculture industrycuratingcurationcut-up techniquecybernetic artCybernetic Serendipitycyberneticscyberpunkcyberspacecyborgdata miningdata visualisationdesign research • dream machine • E.A.T. • early new media • Edward Ihnatowiczengineers • Eugen Roth • exhibitionsexpanded cinemaexperimental musicexperimentation • female artists and digital media • flaneur • flaneuring on the net • Fluxusfoundgenerative artgenetic artglitch • Gordon Pask • GPSgraffiti • Grey Walter • GUI • hackers and painters • hackinghacktivismHCIHerbert FrankehistorieshistoryhypermediahypertextIannis Xenakisimagineeringinformation theoryinsightinstructionsinteractive artinterdisciplinaryInternet • Ivan Picelj • Jack Burnham • Julije Knifer • Ken Rinaldo • kinetic sculpture • Lidija Merenik • live visualsmagic • Manchester Mark 1 • manifestomappingmediamedia archaeologymedia art • media art histories • minimalism • mother of all demos • mousemusical scorenetartnew medianew media art • new media exhibition • new media festival • Nina Wenhart • open sourceopen space • out of print • particle systems • Paul Graham • performance • phonesthesia • playlistpoetrypoliticspractice-led • prehysteries of new media • prehystories of new mediaProcessing (software)programmingprogramming languageprojectspsychogeographyradio artrare • re:place • real-timeresearch artefactresources • retyped • ridiculous • rotten + forgotten • SAIC • sandin image processor • School of the Art Institute of Chicagoscientific visualisation • screen-based • SIGGRAPHSituationistsslide projectorslit-scansoftwaresoftware studiesspeculative designspeculative research • Stewart Brand • surveillancetactical mediataggingtechniquetechnologytelecommunicationtelematic arttelematic experiencetext • textparts • Theo Jansentheoretical contexttheory buildingtimeline • Turing Test • ubiquitous computingunabomberundergraduate researchvideo artvideo synthesizervirtual realityvisual musicvisual research • Vladimir Bonacic • VRWalter Benjaminwearable computing • Williams Tube • world fair • world machine • Xerox PARCZKM • [Nove] tendencije

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2011

Drawing with Code: Works from the Anne and Michael Spalter Collection

29 January to 24 April 2011, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, Massachusetts, USA.

"Drawing with Code brings together a selection of computer–generated art by the form's earliest and most important practitioners from the 1950s to today. The Providence–based collection of Anne and Michael Spalter is one of the largest and most important of its kind in the U.S. and shines a new light onto a darkened corner of the art historical record.

In our current digital environment when just about everyone holds the processing power of a full computer in their pocket, it is difficult to remember a time when computer technology was not involved in every aspect of our lives. In the arts–visual, cinematic, musical, dance, and theater–the computer has become not only an accepted, but in many cases, an intrinsic tool for artistic expression. The artists featured in Drawing with Code emerged in the early computer–era when the technology was rudimentary by current standards and its capabilities rarely extended beyond the world of computation. Merging their interests in art and coding, these practitioners came to be known as 'Algorists,' artists who employed original algorithms to create images. In addition to works on paper, Drawing with Code presents the work of two filmmakers, Lillian Schwartz and Stan VanDerBeek, who were brought into Bell Labs Research by Kenneth Knowlton to make some of the first computer art animations. These six animations were collaborations using Knowlton's BEFLIX (Bell Flicks) programming language for bitmap computer–produced movies.

The artists in Drawing with Code represent some of the earliest innovations in computer–generated art from the U.S., Europe, and Asia, pioneering a new form of collaboration between technology and art that pushed the boundaries of both.

Featured artists: Yoshiyuki Abe, Manuel Barbadillo, Jean–Pierre Hébert, Desmond Paul Henry, Sven Höglund / Bror Wikstörm, Sture Johannessen, G. F. Kammerer–Luka / Jean–Baptist Kempf, Hiroshi Kawano, Kenneth Knowlton, Ben F. Laposky, Manfred Mohr, Vera Molnar, Frieder Nake, George Nees, Lillian F. Schwartz, Stan VanDerBeek, Roman Verotsko, Mark Wilson, and Edward Zajac.

This exhibition is organized by guest curator George Fifield, Director, Boston Cyberarts Inc. and is part of the 2011 Boston Cyberarts Festival."

(deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, 2011)

Fig.1 Ben Laposky (1954–1956). 'Electronic Abstraction 4', oscilliscope, high speed film, photo paper, 16 1/2 inches x 13 inches, Collection of Anne and Michael Spalter.

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1950s2011 • Algorists • algorithm • Anne and Michael Spalter Collection • Anne Spalterartart and coding • BEFLIX • Bell Flicks • Bell Labs • Bell Labs Research • Ben Laposky • bitmap • Boston Cyberarts Festival • Bror Wikstorm • codecomputationcomputer artcomputer-generatedcreative practice • Desmond Paul Henry • digital art exhibitiondigital environmentdigital pioneersdrawing with codeearly computer-era • Edward Zajac • exhibitionfilmmakerFrieder Nake • G. F. Kammerer-Luka • generativeGeorg Nees • Hiroshi Kawano • influential worksinnovation • Jean-Baptist Kempf • Kenneth KnowltonLillian SchwartzManfred Mohr • Manuel Barbadillo • Mark Wilson • Michael Spalter • musicPierre Hebertpractitionerprogramming languageRoman Verostko • Stan VanDerBeek • Sture Johannessen • Sven Hoglund • technologytheatreVera Molnarvisual arts • works on paper • Yoshiyuki Abe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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