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Which clippings match 'Kiwi Short' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 AUGUST 2012

A Game with No Rules: rear projected Kiwi short film melodrama

"A trio of future Kiwi screen stars smoke, smoulder, steal – and worse – in Scott Reynolds' serpentine short noir. Kane (Marton Csokas) and his Zambesi–clad woman on the side (Danielle Cormack) set about ripping off Kane's rich wife (Jennifer Ward–Lealand) with bloody results. Writer/director Scott Reynolds and longtime partner in crime, cinematographer Simon Raby, serve notice of their talents – and inspirations – with heady lighting, deliberately shonky back projection, and opening titles right out of Hitchcock [Saul Bass inspired]. Muso Greg Johnson supplies the horns."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig.1 Scott Reynolds/Zee Films (1994), "A Game with No Rules" Aotearoa New Zealand, 35mm 16 minutes.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 AUGUST 2012

La Vie En Rose (kiwi short film)

Fig.1 Anna Reeves (1994), "La Vie En Rose" (short film excerpt) Aotearoa New Zealand, 16mm 7 minutes.

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TAGS

16mm1994 • Alex Cole-Baker • Anna Reeves • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralasia • catholic priest • cautionary taleidealism • Katie Wolfe • kiwi shortkiwi short filmskiwi shorts • La Vie En Rose (short film) • naivetynz short filmromance • rose (plant) • rose-coloured glasses • rose-tinted glasses • short film • slug • The Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Film • Timothy Balme • Victoria Kelly

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 AUGUST 2012

Stroke: an individual struggles against a dehumanised mass

"Christine Jeffs made her directing debut with this lush, high end (35mm film, Dolby sound) short film. Dorothy (Fiona Samuel), a lone swimmer, luxuriates in tranquil bliss at a deserted pool – only to have her solitude rudely interrupted by a squad of swimmers. A wordless, strikingly choreographed conflict ensues as Dorothy attempts to assert herself against the dehumanised aggression of the swimmers. Stroke was invited to international festivals including Cannes and Sundance; and Jeffs went on to direct feature films Rain and Sunshine Cleaning."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig.1 Christine Jeffs (1994), "Stroke" (short film excerpt) Aotearoa New Zealand, 35mm 8 minutes.

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TAGS

199435mmAotearoa New Zealand • assertiveness • Australasia • choreographed conflict • choreographies for camerachoreographychoreography of conflict • Christine Jeffs • dehumanisation • dehumanised aggression • Fiona Samuel • kiwi shortkiwi short filmskiwi shortsmoving imageNew Zealand on ScreenNZ On Screennz short film • Robin Laing • short filmsportswimmerswimmingThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Film • tranquillity • wordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2004

A disturbing little film called A Little Death

"It's a long time since I've seen a film as genuinely disturbing as A Little Death. The title refers to the phrase 'un petite mort'. French slang for orgasm. This surreal film explores all the ambiguity of that phrase to devastating effect. A couple are making love. Or rather having sex – the hostility between them is palpable. The moment of climax flings them both into another dimension where the emotional savagery of their relationship is played out for real. Luscious colour photography gives way to crisp black and white, as Davison crashes through their bed into an identical room where everything, including her lover, is literally two–dimensional, bleached of life but tilled with an almost impersonal hatred. The tension that previously simmered beneath the surface is unleashed in images of extraordinary violence. Brophy, trapped in the 'wallpaper' of this unnatural room, can only scream as she takes her revenge. This ambitious script is well supported by its technically immaculate execution. It is tightly constructed, beautifully edited and the superb soundtrack is unusually effective, an integral part of the film rattler than (as too often happens) an afterthought. Much of the power of the film has to do with its purely visual logic, it didn't start to make sense to me until I stopped trying to figure out what was going on and just let the images wash over me. This is one of those rare films that can stand repeated viewings (providing you can) and serious philosophical debate, despite the fact its violent take on gender relations is more than a little disturbing. A Little Death is an uncommonly brave and passionate piece of filmmaking that stays in the mind long after it's been seen."

(Pavement magazine, 1995)

Fig.1 Simon Perkins and Paul Swadel (1994). "A Little Death", James Wallace Productions: 16mm, 11 minutes. [A Little Death externalises conflict between characters through the use of physical obstacles and camera perspectives. The film is an evolution of the "Into The Void" project.]
Fig.2 Natalie Robertson (1994). Josephine Davison is confused to find herself on a photocopied floor.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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