Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Programmed Use' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 MARCH 2015

Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space

"A gallery is constructed along laws as rigorous as those for build­ing a medieval church. The outside world must not come in, so windows are usually sealed off. Walls are painted white. The ceil­ing becomes the source of light. The wooden floor is polished so that you click along clinically, or carpeted so that you pad soundlessly, resting the feet while the eyes have at the wall. The art is free, as the saying used to go, 'to take on its own life.' The discreet desk may be the only piece of furniture. In this context a standing ashtray becomes almost a sacred object, just as the firehose in a modern museum looks not like a firehose but an esthetic conundrum. Modernism's transposition of perception from life to formal values is complete. This, of course, is one of modernism's fatal diseases."

(Brian O'Doherty, 1986)

Brian O'Doherty (1986). "Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space", The Lapis Press.

1

TAGS

1976 • aesthetic conundrum • art is free • artistic modernism • Brian O Doherty • clean design • clean white box • design formalismform and function • formal values • functional formgallery spacesideology of the gallery spaceinterior architecturemedieval church • modern museum • modernist aestheticsmodernist design principlesmorphology • neutral gallery space • neutral space • neutral white box • non-placeobjectivity • painted white • polished wooden floor • programmed useregulationsacred spacessingle-minded spacesspatial configurationspatial literacy • structural features • symbolic place • symbolic structures • Thomas McEvilley • transposition of perception • tyranny of modernism • tyranny of modernist aesthetics • white box • white cube • white wa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2014

Generic and self-programmable labour

"Labour is fundamentally divided in two categories: self–programmable labour, and generic labour. Self–programmable labour is equipped with the ability to retrain itself, and adapt to new tasks, new processes and new sources of information, as technology, demand, and management speed up their rate of change. Generic labour, by contrast, is exchangeable and disposable, and co–exists in the same circuits with machines and with unskilled labour from around the world."

(Manuel Castells, 2000, p.16)

Castells, M. (2000). "Materials for an exploratory theory of the network society". British Journal of Sociology Vol. No. 51 Issue No. 1 (January/March 2000) pp. 5–24 [http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals].

Fig.1 Photograph: Keystone/Getty Images.

1

TAGS

2000adaptabilityadapting to changeconcrete poetrydisposable • exchangeable • general principle • generic labour • independent decision-makingindividual initiative • industrial workforce • knowledge worker • labour market • Manuel Castellsprogrammed useself-programmable laboursingle-mindedsocial anthropology • unskilled labour • workforce

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2013

Prendi's vision for the Store of the Future

"As consumers become increasingly more connected and use multiple shopping channels, smart retailers are starting to develop their version of 'Store of the Future' and taking an 'omni channel ' approach. This will vary from business to business and will not look the same for everyone but it will involve digital technology, integration and delivering personal, relevant experiences to your customers."

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 SEPTEMBER 2013

Window shopping with Kate Spade Saturday's touchscreen storefront

"Kate Spade Saturday has taken up residence in New York with four pop–up digital stores appearing as window fronts around the city. ... Standing in front of the window, shoppers can click to explore looks, opt to buy them via PayPal, and best of all have them delivered with an hour to wherever they are in the city thanks to a partnership with eBay. Security also isn't a concern–despite being a giant screen, the initiative doesn't ask for credit card information or your address for every other passerby to see, instead texting you with a link that leads you to your window shop bag on your own phone instead."

1
2

TAGS

2013 • 24hr shopping • click to exploreclothing companyclothing retailer • designer brand • digital storefront • digitally enhanced pop-up shop • eBayfuture interfacesglassyhaptic interfacein-personinteraction designinteractive display • interactive touchscreen • Kate Spade • Kate Spade New York (designer brand) • Kate Spade Saturday (clothing label) • m-commerceNew Yorknon-place • PayPal • pictures under glass • pop-up digital store • pop-up shopprogrammed useretail spaceretail storesingle-minded spaces • store window • storefronttouchscreen • touchscreen storefront • visual facade • William McComb • window display • window front • window shopping

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2003

Augé: spaces of programmed use as non-places

The French Anthropologist Marc Augé uses the expression non–place to describe the effect on an environment that is caused by programmed use. Where instructions for use determine our engagement with a space, where the complexity of interaction is reduced to symbolic meaning. For Augé main roads no longer take travellers on cultural excursions, they facilitate expedient traversal and cultural detachment. In short they transform places designed to be occupied into transport conduits. In environments where there is a sustained use and inhabitation of a space fixed regional character exists. Group and personal identity are established via association with geographic and cultural sites. Places appear to exist as dynamic and vital entities, with ownership and belonging. Environments that are exclusively defined as being operational tend to lack clearly attributable character or identity. They are spaces that are used for their purpose and act in reference to other places. ATM machines, airports and motorways all function in this way. They are single–minded spaces that elicit simple directed use. As regions grow they tend to instigate more and more ways for their occupants to travel, transforming points–of–departure and destinations into methods of transport. At the same time they tend to erode established regional identities and associations. Extended choice tends towards homogenous and generic identity.


Augé, Marc. 1995 Non–Places: Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity, London/New York, : Verso.

TAGS

conduit • cultural excursions • detachmentengagementenvironmentinhabitationMarc AugeModernnon-placeprogrammed usesingle-minded spaces • Super-Modernity • symbolic meaning

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.