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Which clippings match 'Women And Technology' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 SEPTEMBER 2013

Ladies Learning Code: promoting a diverse workforce

"Ladies Learning Code is a Toronto–based not–for–profit organization that runs workshops for women (and men) who want to learn beginner–friendly computer programming and other technical skills in a social and collaborative way. Today we have chapters across Canada, a thriving girls' program called Girls Learning Code and a permanent workshop space in Toronto. Oh, and we're just getting started."

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beginner-friendlyCanadacode clubcollaborative learningcomputer programmerscomputer programmingcomputer programming education • diverse teams • diverse workforce • gendered technology • Girls Learning Code (workshop) • girls programme • Heather Payne • Ladies Learning Code (workshop) • learn to codelearning softwarenot for profitsocial learningsoftware developerssoftware developmentsoftware literacySTEM subjects • technical skills • technology educationTorontowomenwomen and technologywomen in technologyworkshop for womenworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2013

Four women share stories from UK computing's early days

"In three clips from past interviews, Joyce Wheeler and Margaret Marrs talk about their time using EDSAC at Cambridge, and Mary Coombs tells of programming LEO, the world's first business computer. And in a fourth brand new film, Dame Stephanie Shirley shares her extraordinary tale of founding Freelance Programmers, one of the UK's first software startups."

(Lynette Webb, 5 September 2013, Google Europe Blog)

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19591962 • business computer • business womencomputer history • computing heritage • computing history • computing industry • Dina St Johnston • EDSAC • electronic computer • Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator (EDSAC) • Freelance Programmers (IT firm) • gender equalityGoogle (GOOG) • Google Europe Blog • history of computing • home office • home working • inspirational stories • Joyce Wheeler • kindertransport • Lyons Electronic Office (LEO) • Margaret Marrs • Mary Coombs • pioneering womenpioneers in computer science • Stephanie Shirley • University of Cambridge • Vaughan Programming Services (IT firm) • women and technologywomen in businesswomen in leadership positionswomen in technologywomen programmers • working from home

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2012

Gender difference portrayed in vintage business equipment brochures

This collection of photos from business equipment brochures dramatically shows the extent to which our assumptions about gender roles have changed.

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1960s1970sbrochure • business equipment • business equipment brochure • business machine • business machines • computercomputer historygendergender differentiationgender politicsgender rolesgendered technologygenderisationhistoryhistory of computingIBMimage collectionmainframematerial culture • office equipment • retrosales brochureselling the computer revolutionsex sellstechnology marketing • UNIVAC • UNIVAC 9000 Seriesvintage technologywomen and technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JULY 2009

Shopping in 1999 A.D.

"From the film 1967 1999 A.D., a short sponsored by the Philco–Ford Corporation, showing what home shopping would be like three decades in the future. Although they missed the frenetic pace of today's online shopping experience–the housewife's browsing looks almost leisurely–they guessed correctly on the abundance flat–panel screens (with multiple monitors, no less), even if they were off by about a decade. Oh course, they didn't quite put together that we'd still be using keyboards for input."

(Joel Johnson, 10 September 2007, Boing Boing Gadgets)

[While this forecast is clearly about the potential of information and communication technology it also quite dramatically demonstrates the interdependence of technological development and culture e.g. reinforcing 1960's gender stereotypes.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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