Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Cyclic Narrative' keyword pg.1 of 1
07 FEBRUARY 2018

Walkshort (1987) by The Front Lawn

"This classic short film provides an unusual showcase for the founding talents of musical theatre group The Front Lawn — Harry Sinclair and Don McGlashan. The duo play every character in this slice of life set amongst the pedestrians of Auckland's Karangahape Road. The narrative unravels like a baton relay. Walkshort was directed by editor Bill Toepfer."

1

TAGS

1987Aotearoa New ZealandAuckland • baton relay • Bill Toepfer • chance meetingcomedycyclic narrativecyclical narrativeDon McGlashanHarry Sinclair • k-road • Karangahape Road • kiwi short filmsNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on ScreenNZ On Screenpedestrianshort filmThe Front Lawn • Walkshort (1987)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2012

The Lounge Bar: cyclic narrative kiwi short film from 1988

"The zenith of Don McGlashan and Harry Sinclair's legendary Front Lawn collaborations, this iconic Kiwi short follows two men and one woman on a rainy night at a deserted bar. Pivoting on amnesia and woven together by music, two timeframes are seamlessly combined and a darkly humorous plot unfolds. The film had a wide international release (Ireland to Norway, Germany to the USA) and was a finalist in the inaugural American Film Festival."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig.1 The Lounge Bar (1988), Don McGlashan, Harry Sinclair, Aotearoa New Zealand, 35mm 12 minutes.

1

TAGS

198835mmamnesiaAotearoa New ZealandAustralasiabar • caustic humour • chance meeting • Chinese puzzle box • cyclic narrativecyclical narrative • Dance to My Ten Guitars • diegetic sounddisturbing taleDon McGlashanFuture Shorts • Grant Campbell • Harry Sinclair • head injury • headgear • John Gilbert • jukeboxkiwi short films • Kiwiana • Leon Narbey • lounge bar • Lucy Sheehan • memory loss • Monty PythonNew Zealand cinemanon-diegetic soundPeter Jackson • pretty spunky • short filmsongThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short FilmThe Front Lawn • The Girl from Ipanema • The Lounge Bar • Theres a Man at The Bar Staring into Space • weirdness • Wellington Film Society

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JUNE 2007

Ten Canoes: an allegory about respect and community

"Bout time to tell you a story, eh? Then I'll tell you one of ours...

It is longtime ago. It is our time, before you other mob came from cross the ocean...longtime before then. The rains been good and ten of the men go on the swamp, to hunt the eggs of gumang, the magpie goose. One of the men, the young fella, has a wrong love, so the old man tell him a story...a story of the ancient ones, them wild and crazy ancestors who come after the spirit time, after the flood that covered the whole land...

It's a good story, this story I'm gonna be tellin' you 'bout the ancient ones. There's more wrong love in this story, and plenty spears too, and plenty wives...too many wives if you ask me...a beautiful young one and a bit of a jealous one and the older wise one and even more wives than that.

And there's plenty happens in this story...there's a stranger comes and one of them wives goes missin' and there's a man with a belly big as a mountain. There's sorcery and magic too, and a wrong spear in the wrong body, and more spears and bad spirits. And even that's not everything that's happening in this story.

Ahh, you gotta see this story of mine cause it'll make you laugh, even if you're not a blackfella. Might cry a bit too eh? But then you laugh some more...cause this story is a big true story of my people. True thing.

The film Ten Canoes employs a cyclical structure to represent its Indigenous Australian world view. This is done through using a story within a story that works an allegory about respect and community."
Rolf De Heer (Director) & Peter Djigirr (Co–Director)

1
2

TAGS

AboriginalallegoryAustraliaAustralian Aboriginecanoecommunitycycliccyclic narrativecyclical narrative • De Heer • Djigirr • dramafilmIndigenousIndigenous Australiansmobnarrativeparablerespect • Ten Canoes
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.