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Which clippings match 'Privacy Rights' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 JUNE 2015

Artists Against TTIP

"The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP, pronounced tee-tip) is a comprehensive free trade and investment treaty currently being negotiated – largely in secret – between the European Union and the USA.

The scope of the negotiations is very broad. The stated goal is to reduce 'barriers to trade' between the EU and US. In practice TTIP would lead to a huge transfer of power from democratically elected governments to large corporations. The implications for public health, the environment, public service provision, financial regulation, labour standards and social protections are profound. On top of this, research produced for the European Commission estimates that TTIP will lead to the loss of 1 million jobs."

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TAGS

Andrew Scott • Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA)Australian Government • back door • banking regulations • bi-lateral trade agreement • big business • clinical trials • controversial policy • data privacy • environmental legislation • EU • EU REACH • EuropeEuropean Parliamentfinancial crisis • food safety • fracking • growth hormones • international treaties • Investor-State Dispute Settlements (ISDS) • Juliet Stevenson • North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) • pharmaceutical companies • Philip Morrisprivacy rights • public awareness campaign • Quebecregulatory framework • Ruth Wilson • sovereigntytoxic substancestrade agreement • trade deal • Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) • transnational corporations • TTIP • US farmers • USA • Vivienne Westwood

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 OCTOBER 2013

Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

"The Trans–Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a secretive, multi–national trade agreement that threatens to extend restrictive intellectual property (IP) laws across the globe and rewrite international rules on its enforcement."

(Electronic Frontier Foundation)

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TAGS

2011Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA)Aotearoa New ZealandAustralia • Brunei Darussalam • CanadaChilecontroversial policycopyright • copyright measures • Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) • draft document • DRM • due process • Electronic Frontier Foundationevolving needsfreedom of speechgeographical location • innovative technology sector • intellectual property • intellectual property enforcement • international rules • international treatiesJapanlaw enforcement • leaked documents • MalaysiaMexicoonline privacyopen webpatentsPeruprivacy policyprivacy rights • secretive • signatory countries • SingaporeTPPtrade agreementtrademarksTrans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) • US law • USAVietnam

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 MAY 2010

Balancing the interests of creators with society's interest in fostering later expression and creation of new works

"several theoretical views support the position that in life one has strong economic and non–economic claims for control over one's intangible creations. Yet, the paper finds that historical and literary theory in conjunction with recent economic arguments of Professors Brett Frischmann and Mark Lemley regarding positive externalities generated by access to ideas and information, militate in favor of limits on heirs' control over these creations. Furthermore, insofar as society provides the building blocks from which these creations arise, all the theories show that creations must at some point become part of the commons to enable others to generate new creations. Thus the paper argues against the growth of trademark or trademark–like author's rights which have no temporal limit and offer heirs extreme control over access to and use of an author's work and seeks to balance the interests of creators with society's interest in fostering later expression and creation of new works."

(Deven Desai)

Desai, Deven R., Property, Persona, and Publicity (August 21, 2007). TJSL Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1008541. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1008541

TAGS

2007accessaccess to ideasaccess to information • author's rights • authorshipbereavement • Brett Frischmann • commonscontrolcopyrightcreationculture • Deven Desai • ethicsexpressionheirsintangible creationsintellectual property • Mark Lemley • new creations • new worksownershippersonaprivacy rightsproperty • right of publicity • social constructionism • spillover • SSRNtrademark

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MARCH 2010

Facebook: Memorializing Accounts

"When a user passes away, we memorialize their account to protect their privacy. Memorializing an account removes certain sensitive information (e.g., status updates and contact information) and sets privacy so that only confirmed friends can see the profile or locate it in search. The Wall remains so that friends and family can leave posts in remembrance. Memorializing an account also prevents all login access to it."

(Facebook FAQ)

TAGS

after deathbereavementdeathdigital culturedigital graveyardFacebookfamilyfriendsmemorial • memorialise • memorializing accounts • passwordprivacyprivacy rightsremembrance • sensitivity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2004

I Hereby Bequeath My Passwords . . .

"As more of our personal lives go digital, family members, estate attorneys and online service providers are increasingly grappling with what happens to those information bits when their owners die. Sometimes, the question involves email sitting on a distant server; other times, it's about the photos or financial records stored on a password–protected computer. Recently, a Michigan man publicised his struggle to access the Yahoo email account belonging to his son, Marine Lance–corporal Justin M. Ellsworth (2U), who was killed on November 13 in Iraq. Though Yahoo's policies state that accounts 'terminate upon your death', John Ellsworth said his son would have wanted to give him access.'He was wanting to forward his email from strangers,' Mr Ellsworth said. 'They were letters of encouragement. He said all their support kept him motivated. We've talked back and forth about how we were going to print them out and put them in a scrapbook.'To release those messages in such circumstances, Yahoo said, would violate the privacy rights of the deceased and those with whom they had corresponded.'The commitment we've made to every person who signs–ups for a Yahoo! Mail account is to treat their email as a private communication and to treat the content of their messages as confidential,' spokeswoman Mary Osako said in a statement. Other service providers, including America Online, EarthLink and Microsoft, which runs Hotmail have provisions for transferring accounts on proof of death and identity as next of kin. AOL spokesman Nicholas Graham said the company received dozens of such requests a day and had a full–time service representative devoted to meeting requests. Nonetheless, some privacy advocates question whether that's a good approach.'People might decide what they want family members to see or keep secret sometimes for family harmony reasons,' Peter Swire, an Ohio State University law professor, said.'They may know secrets of other family members that they hold in confidence: the sister had an abortion; the father had a first marriage.'Prof Swire said Yahoo's policies were stricter than those for medical records – and rightly so. He said quick access to medical records was needed for emergency care, and such records were unlikely to trample other people's privacy rights, as email could. Rather than maintaining an either/or policy, perhaps service providers could ask users when they signed up whether they would like email disclosed upon death, Jason Catlett, president of the privacy–rights group Junkbusters Corp, said. But Mr Graham said cellphone providers and fitness centres did not make similar requests, and doing so with Internet service 'is simply a turn–off and it's not necessary. We already have a process that works quite well.'For now, such disputes are rare, and most struggles for access involve family members who need to obtain financial records on a computer, Bob Weiss, president of Password Crackers Inc, a Maryland company that recovers lost passwords, said. Less than 2% of his business involved relatives of the deceased. The easiest approach, Internet scholars say, is simply to leave behind a password.'I think this [Yahoo] case will be helpful to people who are thinking about issues not only of inheritance but planning,' Jonathan Ezor, a professor of law and technology at Touro Law Centre in Huntington, New York, said.'When one family member tells another where the important paperwork is, the will, safe deposit box key, etc, the list of passwords is going to be added to that."
(Anick Jesdanun, Associated Press, New York)

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