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Which clippings match 'Expert In The Field' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 OCTOBER 2012

Qualitative Research Methods: interview questions

"Basic descriptive questions
Can you talk to me about your car accident? Tell me what happened on that evening?
Describe how you felt that evening?

Follow–up questions
You mentioned that 'planning time' is important to you. Can you tell me how you use planning time?

Experience/example questions
You mentioned that you loved going to London. Can you give me an example or two of what made you love London?
Talk about your impressions of London.

Simple clarification questions
You have used the term 'constructivist teacher' today. Can you clarify that for me? What exactly can you talk about regarding your constructivist teaching?

Structural/paradigmatic questions
You state that this class was a problematic one. What would you describe as the cause of these problems?
Of all the things you have told me about being a critical care nurse, what is the underlying premise of your work day? In other words, what keeps you going everyday?

Comparison/contrast questions
You said there was a big difference between a great principal and an ordinary principal. What are some of these differences? Can you describe a few for me?"

(Hora Tjitra, Slide 12)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JULY 2012

Communicating and discovering insight through reflective journals

A reflective journal is both a communication tool and a design method for developing professional practice. Such journals allow designers to publish their projects as they progress and provide a platform for critically reflecting on creative works and the design process.

Reflective journals can be used to discover insight about how designers approach their creative problem–solving. This is commonly understood as a central requirement for designers to develop their professionalism and to become experts in the field. They do so through reflecting on their work – characterising common features and critically analysing successes and failures.

Reflective journals also help designers situate their work within the broader creative industries and contemporary visual culture context. Designers might use their journal to document developing trends and to collect examples of inspirational works. These collections might be made as part of the research phase of a given project or contribute to a more general understanding of a design field.

Such journals should take an appropriate form so that they communicate effectively and provide necessary insight. They might exist in a singular form e.g. a workbook, a weblog or they might exist as a collection e.g. as a workbook of sketches with notes/annotations and as a weblog/Tumblr of photographs/videos with associated critical reflections.

The following are examples of art and design reflective journals:

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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