Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Privacy' keyword pg.1 of 4
05 DECEMBER 2016

Towards data justice? The ambiguity of anti-surveillance resistance in political activism

"The Snowden leaks, first published in June 2013, provided unprecedented insights into the operations of state-corporate surveillance, highlighting the extent to which everyday communication is integrated into an extensive regime of control that relies on the 'datafication' of social life. Whilst such data-driven forms of governance have significant implications for citizenship and society, resistance to surveillance in the wake of the Snowden leaks has predominantly centred on techno-legal responses relating to the development and use of encryption and policy advocacy around privacy and data protection. Based on in-depth interviews with a range of social justice activists, we argue that there is a significant level of ambiguity around this kind of anti-surveillance resistance in relation to broader activist practices, and critical responses to the Snowden leaks have been confined within particular expert communities. Introducing the notion of 'data justice', we therefore go on to make the case that resistance to surveillance needs to be (re)conceptualized on terms that can address the implications of this data-driven form of governance in relation to broader social justice agendas. Such an approach is needed, we suggest, in light of a shift to surveillance capitalism in which the collection, use and analysis of our data increasingly comes to shape the opportunities and possibilities available to us and the kind of society we live in."

(Lina Dencik, Arne Hintz and Jonathan Cable, 2016)

TAGS

2016 • activist practices • anti-surveillance resistance • Arne Hintz • big data • collection and processing of data • critical responses • Danielle Citron • data collection • data collection and retention • data encryption • data justice • data processes • data protectiondata security • data tracking • data-driven form of governance • data-driven forms of governance • datafication • datafication of social life • David Lyon • Edward Snowden • everyday communication • Frank Pasquale • individual rights • John Sylvia IV • Jonathan Cable • Lina Dencik • Miriyam Aouragh • Natasha Dow • personal data • policy advocacy • political activism • politics of data-driven processes • privacy • privacy and the protection of personal data • profiling • protection of personal data • regime of control • resistance to surveillance • retention of informationsocial justice • social justice activists • social justice agendas • social life • societal implications of data collection • state-corporate surveillance • surveillance • techno-legal responses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 DECEMBER 2013

Danah Boyd: The Future of Privacy in Social Media

"Today's youth are sharing a tremendous amount of information through social media. They share to connect, but in connecting, they leave large traces of their interactions for unexpected audiences to view. Those who care about privacy are scratching their heads, trying to make sense of why youth share and what it means for the future of privacy. danah will discuss how youth understand privacy in a networked world. She will describe youths' attitudes, practices, and strategies before discussing the implications for companies and the government."

(Danah Boyd, Microsoft Corporation, recorded 6 March 2012, duration 00:30:41.

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TAGS

2012 • being connected • cheating privacy • controlDanah Boyd • data persistence • ethnographic researcheveryday cultureFacebookfriendship networks • future of privacy • hanging outidentity constructionidentity performanceMicrosoft CorporationMySpace • network privacy • network public environment • networked publicsnetworked world • networked youth • online context • online interactionsparticipationpowerpower and agencyprivacy • privacy settings • private by default • private spacepublic by default private through effortpublic spacessearchabilitysharingsocial agencysocial groomingsocial identitysocial mediasocial networking sitessocial practicestechnology affordancestraces • understanding privacy • unexpected audiences • unstructured setting • video lecture • why youth share • young people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 DECEMBER 2013

Divining a Digital Future - Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell

"Ubiquitous computing (or 'ubicomp') is the label for a 'third wave' of computing technologies. Following the eras of the mainframe computer and the desktop PC, ubicomp is characterized by small and powerful computing devices that are worn, carried, or embedded in the world around us. The ubicomp research agenda originated at Xerox PARC in the late 1980s; these days, some form of that vision is a reality for the millions of users of Internet–enabled phones, GPS devices, wireless networks, and 'smart' domestic appliances. In Divining a Digital Future, computer scientist Paul Dourish and cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell explore the vision that has driven the ubiquitous computing research program and the contemporary practices that have emerged––both the motivating mythology and the everyday messiness of lived experience.

Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the authors' collaboration, the book takes seriously the need to understand ubicomp not only technically but also culturally, socially, politically, and economically. Dourish and Bell map the terrain of contemporary ubiquitous computing, in the research community and in daily life; explore dominant narratives in ubiquitous computing around such topics as infrastructure, mobility, privacy, and domesticity; and suggest directions for future investigation, particularly with respect to methodology and conceptual foundations."

Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell (2011). "Divining a Digital Future: Mess and Mythology in Ubiquitous Computing", MIT Press, May 2011, ISBN 978–0–262–01555–4.

TAGS

1980s2011computer sciencecomputingcontemporary practices • contemporary ubiquitous computing • cultural anthropologydaily lifedesktop computer • desktop PC • Divining a Digital Future (book) • domesticity • embedded in the world around us • everyday messiness • feature phone • future investigation • Genevieve Bell • GPS devices • infrastructureinterdisciplinary collaboration • internet-enabled phones • lived experiencemainframemobility • Paul Dourish • privacyresearch communityresearch methodology • small and powerful computing devices • smart domestic appliances • smart phones • third wave of computing technologies • ubicomp • ubicomp research • ubiquitous computing • ubiquitous computing research • wireless networkswornXerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
14 JULY 2012

Yahoo IP lawsuit: We patented Facebook's entire social network model

"'Facebook's entire social network model, which allows users to create profiles for and connect with, among other things, persons and businesses, is based on Yahoo!'s patented social networking technology,' Yahoo claims in the lawsuit, filed yesterday in US District Court in Northern California. 'Prior to adopting Yahoo!'s patented social networking technology in 2008, Facebook was considered one of the worst performing Internet sites for advertising. Facebook's use of that social networking model has reportedly dramatically driven up Facebook's advertising click through rates.'

Nearly all the technology that makes Facebook successful is based on Yahoo patents, the company further states.

'For much of the technology upon which Facebook is based, Yahoo! got there first and was therefore granted patents by the United States Patent Office to protect those innovations. Yahoo!'s patents relate to cutting edge innovations in online products, including in messaging, news feed generation, social commenting, advertising display, preventing click fraud, and privacy controls,' Yahoo alleged in its court filing. 'These innovations dramatically improve user experience, privacy, and security and enhance the ability of advertisers to connect with users.'"

(Jon Brodkin, 13 March 2012, Ars Technica)

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TAGS

20082012 • advertisers connecting with users • advertising click through rates • advertising displayadvertising revenueArs Technica • click fraud • cutting-edge innovationsdisputeFacebookintellectual property rightsIPRlawsuitmessaging • news feed generation • online products • ownershippatent • patent dispute • patented social networking technology • patentsprivacyprivacy controls • security features • social commenting • social network model • social networking • social networking technology • technological innovationtechnologytechnology innovation • United States Patent Office • US District Court in Northern California • user experience • user profiles • Yahoo!

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 APRIL 2012

Marshall McLuhan debates his ideas on Australian TV in 1977

"In June 1977 Marshall McLuhan visited Australia and was a guest on Monday Conference, a popular live ABC television show hosted by Robert Moore. McLuhan debated his ideas with Moore and took questions from a feisty studio audience made up of members of the media and advertising industry, including TV boss Bruce Gyngell (see Part One at 14 mins), and young, funky Derryn Hinch (see Part Two from 3 mins).

McLuhan had been brought to Australia to address a broadcasting conference organised by Sydney radio station 2SM, and the Monday Conference was broadcast from the ballroom of the Sydney Hilton Hotel.

Many in the audience clearly admired McLuhan who has well into his prime and at ease with the live television situation. The discussion covered an eclectic range of topics, from television, privacy and Richard Nixon to holograms, transcendental meditation, Jane Austen, Euclidean geometry, denim jeans and nude streaking.

Towards the end of the program the always unpredictable McLuhan can be heard just off–mic, saying to Moore, 'I'm terribly sorry, but I'm going to have to sneak off and have a pee!'."

(ABC Radio National, Australia)

Fig.1,2&3 Marshall Mcluhan, lecture recorded by ABC Radio National Network on 27 June 1977 in Australia.

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TAGS

1977 • 2SM • ABC Radio National (Australia) • ABC Radio National Network • advertising industry • age of anxiety • age of electronic media • anxietyAustraliaAustralian Broadcasting CorporationBionic Woman • broadcasting conference • Bruce Gyngell • Canadiancommunicationcool mediumdebate • denim jeans • Derryn Hinchdigital eraelectronic mediaEuclidean geometryfolk artglobal villagehologram • hot medium • information anxietyinformation revolution • interconnectivity • InternetJane Austenlecture • live television • loss of privacy • Marshall McLuhanmass media age • McLuhan Project • media • media industry • media theory • media visionary • mediummedium is the messagemessage • Monday Conference (show) • networked societynostalgic yearning • nude streaking • privacyradio stationRichard Nixon • Robert Moore • studio audienceSydney • Sydney Hilton Hotel • television • The McLuhan Project • thinker • transcendental meditation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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