Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Prison' keyword pg.1 of 2
31 JULY 2016

The Gift Of The Town: Terezin transit camp Nazi propaganda film

"In response to growing international awareness of Nazi atrocities, the Nazis decided to allow a Red Cross investigation committee to visit the Theresienstadt ghetto in Czechoslovakia [in August-September 1944]. Elaborate measures were taken to disguise conditions in the ghetto and to portray an atmosphere of normalcy."

(United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC)

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1944 • Altentransporte • Bohemia • camp life • concentration campCzechoslovakiadisease • elaborately staged hoax • false picture • falsity • film clip • fort • fortress • garrison city • ghetto • hoax • International Red Cross • Jewish ghetto • Jewish Holocaust • Joseph II • Karel Peceny • Kurt Gerron • malnutrition • Maria Theresa of Austria • Moravia • Nazi propaganda films • Nazis • political prisoner • prisonpropaganda film • rail transports • Red Cross • Terezin • Theresienstadt • Theresienstadt ghetto • transit camp • World War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 FEBRUARY 2015

Achterbahn: the story behind Berlin's abandoned Spreepark

"Norbert Witte hatte einen Traum: er wollte aus dem Berliner Spreepark–einem Freizeitpark, der zu DDR–Zeiten unter dem Namen »Plänterwald« berühmt geworden ist–den größten Rummelplatz des gerade wiedervereinigten Deutschlands machen. Stattdessen ging der König der Karusselle pleite und setzte sich mit seiner Familie und dem größten Teil seiner Gerätschaften im Jahre 2002 nach Peru ab. Er hinterließ der Stadt Berlin einen Riesenberg Schulden und ein großes Chaos. In Peru verwickelt er sich und seinen 20jährigen Sohn in Drogengeschäfte. Beide landen im Knast: Norbert Witte in Deutschland, sein Sohn in einem der härtesten Knäste der Welt…"

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19692003 • abandoned amusement park • abandoned places in Eastern Europeabandoned ruins • abandoned theme park • Achterbahn (2009) • amusement parkBerlin • boarded up • cocaine • dark undersidedeserted placesdinosaurdocumentary film • drug smuggling • drug trafficking • East Berlin • East Germany • entertainment park • filming location • fun park • fun-rides • GDRGermany • Hanna (2011) • Kulturpark Planterwald • Lima • Marcel Witte • neglected buildings • Norbert Witte • Peru • Peter Dorfler • Pia Witte • Planterwald • prison • rollercoaster • ruins • Sabrina Witte • Sarita Colonia prison • Spree river • Spreepark • Spreepark Berlin • Spreepark GmbH • Treptow-Kopenick • Treptower Park • urban decay

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JUNE 2013

The Stanford Prison Experiment

"Welcome to the Stanford Prison Experiment web site, which features an extensive slide show and information about this classic psychology experiment, including parallels with the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. What happens when you put good people in an evil place? Does humanity win over evil, or does evil triumph? These are some of the questions we posed in this dramatic simulation of prison life conducted in the summer of 1971 at Stanford University.

How we went about testing these questions and what we found may astound you. Our planned two–week investigation into the psychology of prison life had to be ended prematurely after only six days because of what the situation was doing to the college students who participated. In only a few days, our guards became sadistic and our prisoners became depressed and showed signs of extreme stress. Please join me on a slide tour describing this experiment and uncovering what it tells us about the nature of human nature."

(Philip G. Zimbardo)

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1971Abu Ghraib Prisonauthoritybrutalitycommand responsibility • Cool Hand Luke (1967) • dehumanisationdeindividuationdignitydisciplineethics • guard • guilthuman experimentationhuman naturehuman subjectshuman willhumiliationimprisonmentmoral dignitymoral dilemmamoralitynature of morality • Philip Zimbardo • powerpower corruptsprisonprisonerpsychology • research experiment • research study • self-controlsimulation studysocial experimentssocial responsibility • Stanford Prison Experiment • suffering injustice

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 MAY 2008

Israel is building its own Berlin Wall

"The structure in question (misleadingly called a fence or barrier) is in fact an ingeniously designed system of population control that includes 4–metre deep trenches on either side of a concrete wall or coiled wire through which an electric current runs, trace paths to register footprints, a two–lane military patrol road, and watchtowers at regular intervals. In other words, a maximum security prison in which an entire population is trapped.

Israel's stated reason for building the wall is to prevent attacks from suicide bombers. One wonders then why Israel did not build the wall along the Green Line. In fact, Israel's wall is clearly designed to help Israel grab Palestinian land and to make life so intolerable for Palestinians that they will be forced to emigrate.
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Future generations will wonder why so many people remained silent for so long while Israel adopted a policy that slowly destroyed a nation. This month marked the 14th anniversary of the fall of the hated Berlin Wall. Why does the world watch in silence as Israel builds a much crueler wall in the West Bank?"

(Ida Audeh, 28 November 2003, Ramallah Online via Speakout Column in the Rocky Mountain News)

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2003autonomybarrierBerlin Wallcitizenshipcivil libertiescontrolfence • Green Line • Ida Audeh • ideological intoleranceintoleranceIsraelnationhoodPalestinian • population control • powerprison • Ramallah • Ramallah Online • Rocky Mountain News • securitysegregationspacesuicide bombersterritorywall

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2005

Regulation through discourses/practices

"The prison operates through the production of norms to divide the population into prisoners and non–prisoners. Since the goal of the prison is to return prisoners to the status of non–prisoners, there must be a criterion, one carefully and comprehensively elaborated, to recognise the non–prisoner, the prisoner, and the developmental stages in the change from the one to the other. There must also be a detailed regimen to effectuate the change. There must finally be a method or system of keeping track of the change in each prisoner. Foucault borrows from Bentham the term Panopticon (one who sees all) to denote the entire apparatus of defining the norm, disciplining the negative term, observing the change from the negative to the positive and studying the whole process so that it can be perfected. But there is a difference. For Bentham the Panopticon was an artifice that deflected the criminal's mind from the irrationality of transgression to the rationality of the norm. It imposed social authority on the prisoner in a constant, total manner. The prisoner's actions could be monitored by guards at any time but without his ever knowing it. The prisoner would, in Rousseau's phrase, be forced to be free. With no escape or reprieve from the Panoptical eye, the prisoner would accept the authority of the norm with its rational system of pleasures and pains. For Foucault the task is to see the system as an imposition of a structure of domination, not as a rational, humanist intention. As we know, the Panopticon, evaluated on the standards of liberal and Benthamite theory, is a failure. Foucault's aim is to grasp the workings of the Panopticon outside the liberal framework: if it does not reform prisoners, what does it do? What are the effects of the social text of the prison, of Panoptical discourse? His argument is that the prison, in the context of a liberal capitalist society that celebrates the anarchy of the marketplace, the chaos of free monads pursuing infinite wants, the rationality of the unhindered subject – the prison in this world imposes the technology of power, the 'micropolitics' of the norm. In capitalist society, regulation takes the form of discourses/practices that produce and reproduce the norm. The school, the asylum, the factory, the barracks to greater or lesser degrees and with considerable variation all imitate the Panopticon. In modern society power is imposed not by the personal presence and brute force of a caste of nobles as it was in earlier times but by the systematic scribblings in discourses, by the continual monitoring of daily life, adjusting and readjusting ad in finitum the norm of individuality. Modern society may be read as a discourse in which nominal freedom of action is canceled by the ubiquitous look of the other. It may be interpreted semiologically as a field of signs in which the metadiscourse of the Panopticon is reimposed everywhere, even in places in which it is not installed. We may suggest that the free individual requires a repressed other, a sort of external super–ego, an absent father if only to guarantee his or her freedom."

(Mark Poster pp.90–91)

Poster, Mark. 1990 The Mode of Information: Poststructuralism and Social Context, Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. ISBN: 0745603262

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asylumauthority • barracks • biopolitical power relationscapitalismcontrolcultural normsdisciplinediscipline and punishmentdiscoursedominationfactoryJeremy Bentham • liberal capitalist society • Mark Poster • metadiscourse • Michel Foucaultmonadmonitoringnormspanopticonpracticeprisonprisonerpunishmentregulationrulesschoolsocial normsthe other
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