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Which clippings match 'Blonde' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 OCTOBER 2013

Decoding BMW's You Know You Are Not The First

"The young woman's flawless skin is emphasizing the societal view of how perfection is what is considered beautiful and ideal. Her skin doesn't have a single blemish bruise, bump, or scar on it. Her makeup is very subtle and her cheeks have a slight rosy glow to them, giving her a very youthful appearance. The lack of jewelry is also making her look younger and more innocent and it is putting the focus solely on her bare flawless skin, this flawlessness is likely representing what one would get if they purchase one of their premium selection used BMW's, spotlessness in paint and interior.

Although BMW engages this image of innocence and flawlessness, there also appears to be a significant sexual message in this ad because the initial 'Innocent' image dissolves as you skim down the ad and see how the young woman's eye contact is directly with the camera, and it looks as if she is looking right into your eyes with a seductive expression. Her mouth also get a lot of attention as it appears to be slightly open, drawing your attention right to her full lips, 'open lips are used to suggest sexual excitement or passion'"

(Sonia Sidhu, 10 June 2012)

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TAGS

2008advertising campaignArthur Berger • atypical • blondeBMWbranded commodities • car company • constructed meaningcultural normsdepictions of womeneye contact • flawlessness • Germanglobalisation of aspirationGreece • hair colour • innocenceinterpretation • media analysis • media criticismmedia textmouth • olive skin • paradigmatic analysis • partially unclothedperfection • print advertisement • seduction • semiotic approach • semioticssex objectsexual agency • sexual excitement • signification • skin tone • suggestive narratives • syntagmatic analysis • textual analysis • used car • virginity • visual symbolism • young woman • young women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Paolo Gioli's cinematic tone poem to Marilyn Monroe

"Italian film maker Paolo Gioli creates a haunting short movie by animating photographs taken by Bert Stern of Marilyn Monroe shortly before she died at the age of 36, fifty years ago today.

Filmarilyn is both beautiful and foreboding. As the film's jazzy rhythms start to disintegrate and the images slow to a crawl, 'X' marks on the contact sheets appear like magical curses and a fresh scar on Marilyn's flesh transforms into a stigmata while her face, half–hidden by shrouds of white, eyes closed, turns impossibly pale and lifeless. In the final moments, close–ups of her hands in death–like repose seem almost saintly and as the film's last frames unspool we are left with the sense of having seen an apparition, a ghost... a soul X–rayed.

It's amazing how much power and sadness Gioli creates from so few elements – a testimony to his artistry, Marilyn's radiance and Stern's skill in capturing it."

(Marc Campbell, 05 August 2012, Dangerous Minds)

Fig.1 Paolo Gioli (1992) "Filmarilyn", uploaded to Vimeo by Volodymyr Bilyk.

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TAGS

1992 • actress • animated sequenceanimated video • animating photographs • apparitionavant-garde cinema • Bert Stern • blondecelluloid • contact sheet • cultural icondeath • death-like repose • depth of focus • disintegrate • experimental film • eyes closed • Filmarilyn • Filmmarilyn • final moments • forebodingfound imagesframe by frameghost • haunting • HollywoodHollywood starletjazz rhythm • lifeless • manipulated images • Marilyn Monroe • modulated object framing • motion designnon-narrative • Paolo Gioli • photographic blow-upspop iconre-purposerhythmic motionrisque • scar • scavengedsequence design • sex symbol • short film • short movie • shrouds of white • simulate dimensionality • slow to a crawl • soul • stigmata • still images • still photographs • stop-frame animation • superstar • tantalizing • tone poem • unspool • visual recessions • X marks • x-ray

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2012

21 year old Valeria Lukyanova wants to be a real-life Barbie doll

"Most little girls grow up playing with Barbie dolls. Some even want to look like them. One 21–year–old has become one, or so she says.

Valeria Lukyanova has become an internet sensation in her home country of Russia, claiming on her blog to be the most famed woman on the Russian–language internet.

Her doll–like features, long blonde hair and 'perfect' body make her look like a real life Barbie."

(Laura Cox, PUBLISHED: 18:14, 22 April 2012 | UPDATED: 01:40, 25 April 2012, Dailymail.co.uk)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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