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Which clippings match 'Annotations' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 MAY 2015

Six years: the dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972

"Lippard was a primary critic and theorist of Conceptual art; this book, however, provides not commentary but, instead, primary documentation. It takes the form of an annotated, thematic timeline: the chapters list books (including exhibition catalogs) published each year, followed by articles, statements, activities, and works arranged by month. Photographs illustrate selected works. The annotations are, for the most part, as documentary as possible (transcripts, excerpts of artists' statements, etc.). Lippard's editorial hand is most visible in her inclusions and exclusions; less so in her only occasional textual insertions. As such, the book performs as Lippard had envisioned: 'to expose the chaotic network of ideas in the air, in America and abroad, between 1966 and 1971' (5)."

Lucy Lippard (1973). "Six years: the dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972; a cross-reference book of information on some esthetic boundaries". New York: Praeger.

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TAGS

1973 • Adrian Piper • Agnes Denes • Alighiero Boetti • Allan Kaprow • Allen Ruppersberg • annotationsart objectArt-Language • arte povera • Athena Tacha Spear • Barry Flanagan • Barry Le Va • Bas Jan Ader • Bernar Venet • Bruce McLean • Bruce Nauman • Carl Andre • Catherine Morris • chaotic network of ideas • Charles Harrison • Christine Kozlov • chronology • Claes Oldenburg • conceptual artcontemporary art • Dan Graham • Daniel Buren • David Askevold • dematerialisation of the art object • Dennis Adrian • Dennis Oppenheim • digital art production • Donald Burgy • Douglas Huebler • earth art • Edward Ruscha • Eldritch Priest • Eleanor Antin • ephemeral art • Franz Erhard Walther • Franz Walther • Frederick Barthelme • Gerald Ferguson • Gerry Schum • Gilbert and George • Guerrilla Art Action Group • Hanne Darboven • Hans Haacke • Ian Burn • Ian Wilson • idea art • immateriality • information art • Jack Burnham • James Lee Byars • Jan Dibbets • John Baldessari • John Latham • Joseph BeuysJoseph Kosuth • Keith Arnatt • Keith Sonnier • La Monte Young • land art • Lawrence Weiner • Lee Lozano • Lucy Lippard • material concerns • materiality of artefacts • Mel Bochner • Mel Ramsden • Michael Asher • Michael Heizer • Michael Snow • Michelangelo Pistoletto • minimal art • N.E. Thing Co. • object art • On Kawara • performance art • Peter Downsbrough • Peter Hutchinson • post-conceptual • post-conceptual art • post-conceptualism • postconceptual • postconceptualism • provocative book • Rafael Ferrer • Richard Artschwager • Richard Long • Richard Serra • Robert Barry • Robert Morris • Robert Ryman • Robert SmithsonSeth SiegelaubSigmar PolkeSol LeWitt • Stanley Brouwn • Stephen Kaltenbach • Tony Smith • Victor Burgin • video art movements • Vincent Bonin • Vito Acconci • Walter de Maria • William Wegman • William Wiley • Willoughby Sharp • Wolf Vostell • Yoko Ono

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2013

Using a Recording Template as part of a Reflective Practice Model

"An RT [Recording Template] is required to collate this evidence forming a framework from which we will annotate the project's life cycle. This reflection will bring about a direct interface with the learning contract (LC) objectives and help shape and control the project as it occurs. Alongside the RT, a daily journal will also be kept and all the notes of communication from peers logged and referred back to. This triangulation of data, will allow me to gain a sense of perspective towards my research. The different evidence will qualify a more balanced view of events."

(James Kelway, 31 March 2005)

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TAGS

action researchannotationsBob DickCal Swann • daily journal • data triangulation • Donald Schon • evidence forming • evidence gatheringhigher education • James Kelway • James McKernan • Jean McNiff • Josey-Bass • Kogen Page • learning contract • lifecycle model • Ortrunn Zuber-Skeritt • practice of design • professional developmentproject method • project reflection • project work • recording template • reflective journalreflective practitionerresearch method • Rizal Sebastian • triangulation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2012

Medieval manuscript illustrations were planned not doodled

"it's the word 'doodle' that really riles my pedantic dander. ... because, as I try to make clear, the images I post ... weren't scribbled into the margins by surreptitious snarkers whilst no one was looking. They were explicitly commissioned by the manuscript's patrons as part of the project from the very beginning. For the well–heeled noble, ordering a book was not just a matter of selecting the text; deciding on size, presentation, illustration, and ratio of naked dudes to non–naked dudes in the margins was all part of the process of getting a book made.

This is not to say that medieval readers and scribes didn't ever doodle. It's just easy to tell the difference between images planned as part of the manuscript's commission and those scribbled in by a creative, bored scribe or one of the later owners of the manuscript. Just as you might imagine, a reader might decide a chunk of text was particularly important and make a note in the margin ... Or, someone might just decide a page looked too blank and thus attempt to fill up some of that space [1]... See, the thing about medieval doodles is they look just like modern doodles ...

For this page [2], somebody sat down and sketched out a rough draft, showed it to somebody else, possibly even multiple somebodies. There were meetings. Consultants were brought in. The client was consulted. And at some point somebody said, 'Yes, that's very nice, the nuns smuggling that dude into their nunnery. Very topical. But I don't like that blanket. Too drab. Can we get someone to put some flowers on it? The difference is, I hope, clear. You don't doodle in gold leaf."

(Carl Pyrdum, 13 February 2012, Got Medieval)

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TAGS

annotationannotationsbookclientcomment systemcommentscommission • commissioned • doodledoodlingembellishmentexpository addendum • fill the space • footnotegloss (marginal notation) • gold leaf • illuminated manuscriptillustrationsinformation in contextmanuscript • manuscript illustrations • manuscriptsmargin notes • marginal illustrations • marginal notationmarginaliamarginsmedieval • medieval doodles • medieval readers • modern doodles • nakednotationnote in the marginnotesnunpage • planned images • planned not doodled • rough draft • scholia • scribbled • scribbled into the marginsvisual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2012

Annotate That! content commentary and sharing application

"Annotate That! is a free unique annotating service. Share web pages, images or documents with others and add your comments using annotations. Simply click on the web page or medium to make your annotation."

(Dean Claydon, We Create Digital)

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TAGS

add your comments • annotate • Annotate That! • annotating service • annotationannotation serviceannotationsaugmentationaugmentative communicationaugmented contentcomment systemcontent sharingcooperative design knowledgecritical commentarycritique • Dean Claydon • digital contentembellishmenterasurehypermediacyinformation sharinginterpretationjuxtapositionlayerlayeredlayering • make your annotation • metadataorganisationoverlaypalimpsestreinterpretationresearch toolsharesharing and distributing knowledge • sharing application • sharing ideasstackingtext layers • We Create Digita

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 APRIL 2007

A Dual Strategy: reading both annotations and their texts

"This reveals a dual strategy: firstly, we are not 'reading' a text through its main text only, but more through its periphery and specific textures like the notes apparatus, the selection of pictures, the quotations and references, the imprint, the binding or context for an essay etc. Academic texts present this subtext and context apparatus very consciously. The second part of the strategy is that the index, relieved of its referential quality, has now become the main text.

These artists 'liberate' images (Peter Piller) and words (Douglas Blau) from their original indexicality of reference to an original system, so that they can be re–ordered and opened up to a new way of reading. The generative quality of the text apparatuses and the logic of the library (as a store for all reference structures), make the archive into a producer and into an archive of potential texts. Text and image are not just placed in the archive as an 'Akte' (document) but become 'Akteure' (actors) in their own right. It is misleading to talk about a knowledge store when in fact we are dealing with a knowledge generator."

(Rudolf Frieling, Media Art Net)

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