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11 OCTOBER 2015

David Cross: A Question of Trust (visceral and embodied experience)

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TAGS

2015actions have consequencesaesthetic spectacleaffect theory • anecdote • anthropomorphismAustralian artistclaustrophobic spaces • concepts of affect • David Cross • Deakin Universitydisarmamentembodimentfeel thingshandlehold mehuman bodyhyper-sensualityinflatableinstallation sculptureintimate transaction • non visual art • phobia • playful spacepropinquitypublic artscopophiliasense of touch • sensory modalities • sensory phenomenashow (spectacle)social exchangespatial intimacytactile experienceTED Talks • TEDxDeakinUniversity • touch metrust • unguarded experience • visceral experiencevisceral journeyvisceral theorywe experience the world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

The practice-exegesis relationship in PhD research

"What characterises creative arts research practice in universities that offer doctoral degrees is the requirement not only to undertake a substantial practical project, but also a reflective exegesis that contextualises the methodologies and significant contributions of the research. The specific components of the exegesis are defined by each institution and re–negotiated by each candidate according to differing emphases. Fortunately, and by design, the function of each candidate's exegesis can be redefined in relation to the practice it seeks to elucidate. And whilst the requirement to also present a substantial written component can initially appear as a burdensome or daunting prospect for those unfamiliar with the processes of critical reflection – to those who recognise its reflexive possibilities – the exegesis in parallel with the creative work of the project can provide another arena of creative practice. In this respect, the outcomes of both a creative arts–based project and its exegesis can be presented as significant contributions to knowledge in the field. Moreover, a third creative space opens. By interchanging and integrating the practice with the exegesis, it may be possible to generate a combined and reflexive research praxis. This chapter examines aspects of the practice–exegesis relationship with reference to my experience of undertaking and completing my doctoral research at Deakin University. I am, therefore, speaking from a position of having confronted and struggled with the practice–exegesis relationship from inside the playing field."

(Stephen Goddard, 2007, p.113)

Goddard, S. (2007). Correspondence Between Practices. "Practice as Research: Approaches to Creative Arts Enquiry". E. Barrett and B. Bolt, I.B.Tauris & Co Ltd. [http://www.scribd.com/doc/113746755/Practice–as–Research].

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2005

Supporting Flexible Learning Through The Use Of Coalescing Agents

"One way of supporting [flexible learning] could be through the use of coalescing agents, such as RSS Syndication and information folksonomies. RSS Syndication is a publishing method that allows information to be easily distributed on–line. Its main advantage is that unlike traditional publishing methods, RSS Syndication offers the ability for subscribers to integrate content according to their own needs. It also offers an alternative to the traditional producer/consumer relationship of publishing. RSS Syndication allows both producers and consumers to subscribe and syndicate information. In a learning and teaching situation, this ability has the potential to foster informal research networks. Unlike formal group arrangements, networks formed through syndication are able to be formed and dissolved at will. Once a network has lost its relevance, its members are free to form new networks through the simple process of un–subscription and re–subscription. James Farmer at Deakin University has recently discussed the potential of RSS syndication for promoting a semi–latticed interaction model (Farmer 08–06–2005) for Weblog association. Farmer believes that 'the number of potential interrelationships between writer and reader is almost unlimited and drawn from control being centred on the user' (Farmer 08–06–2005). In this way, inter–connected on–line student journals could help to provide shared and autonomous contexts of enquiry within fluid networks of association. Folksonomies also provide a useful technique for promoting the formation of research networks. Folksonomies are complex indexing structures that are able to evolve and change dynamically. Unlike taxonomies, folksonomies are created collectively through the intersection and overlaying of multiple indexes. Folksonomies form through the process of keyword Tagging. Tagging allows users to both organise information and create information aggregates through category assignment. Students organising information in this way are able to make connections between their enquiry and the enquiry of their peers'. They are able to identify varying degrees of relevance to their own enquiry through category groupings and keyword association. In this way a situation called Legitimate Peripheral Participation (LPP) is able to emerge. Students that observe associations between their taxonomies and their peers' are able to contribute to their peers' folksonomies. In so doing they may be able to evolve common research endeavours and research networks. The adaptive ability of these coalescing agents offers significant advantage for learning and teaching situations. Their ability to facilitate dynamic connections can support students forming their own research networks. Their ability to foster LPP can help students evolve informal and loose associations. Through supporting students in their formation and negotiation of research networks, coalescing agents have the potential promote a socio–constructivist approach to learning and teaching".

(Simon Perkins, 2005)

1). Perkins, Simon C. (2005) "Towards a socio–constructivist approach to learning and teaching within OLT environments". In OLT 2005 Conference, September 2005.

08 JUNE 2005

Semi-lattice relationships through RSS aggregation

"With the use of RSS it is possible not only for blogs to exist in a semi–lattice relationship online but also for users to access their information in a semi–latticed sense where RSS feeds can be rearranged, ordered or, perhaps most notably, received in what the co–creator of RSS, Dave Winer, calls a 'river of news' aggregator [Winer, 2005]. As a result of this ease of management of large amounts of information and complete control over subscription to that, the number of potential interrelationships between writer and reader is almost unlimited and drawn from control being centred on the user."

(James Farmer 2005, Blogtalk Downunder)

Proceedings of the Blogtalk Downunder Conerence, 19–22 May 2005, Sydney, Australia.

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TAGS

2005aggregationAustralia • Blogtalk Downunder Conference • Dave WinerDeakin Universitye-learningeducation content syndicationfeedsJames Farmerlatticeonline learning • river of news • RSSsemilattice
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