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Which clippings match 'Power' keyword pg.1 of 8
28 JANUARY 2016

Herland: the forgotten feminist classic from 1915

"Charlotte Perkins Gilman's novel, Herland, is regarded by many as the pioneering feminist utopian novel. Authored in 1915 (but published as a monograph only in 1978), Herland is intended as a social critique, and as a sociological theorist, Gilman sees herself as a change agent for a better social life for women especially, as well as society in general. Like other intellectuals at the turn of the 20th century, Gilman struggled to theorise her social vision, whilst simultaneously placing great efforts at promoting her vision in a package that is attractive to the masses. By self-consciously distancing herself from the intellectuals of her time, she crafted her works as endeavours at transforming society. With the utopian novel as her genre of choice, Gilman provides readers with a deeper sense of understanding of the ills of a society that subscribes to and is fixated with masculinity. As such, it is the contention of this paper to discuss Gilman's second novel, Herland as a feminist utopian novel critiquing some aspects of culture Gilman describes as androcentric and to briefly link the images portrayed by Gilman in Herland to the Jungian theory of archetypes with some reference to female archetypal images."

(Shahizah Ismail Hamdan and Ravichandran Vengadasamy, 2006)

Shahizah Ismail Hamdan, and Ravichandran Vengadasamy , (2006) Herland and Charlotte Perkin Gilman's Utopian Social Vision of Women And Society. e-BANGI: Jurnal Sains Sosial dan Kemanusiaan, 1 (1). pp. 1-8. ISSN 1823-884x

TAGS

191520th centuryallegorical displacementsallegory • Aryan women • asexual reproduction • biplane • Charlotte Perkins Gilman • critiquedystopian science fiction • expedition party • fantastical • feminist • feminist classic • feminist critique • Forerunner (magazine) • gender politics • held captive • Herland (1915) • human reproduction • ideal social order • imaginary worldsinfluential worksisland • isolated society • LibriVox • masculinity • moral speculation • motherhoodnovel • parthenogenesis • power • public domain audiobook • reimagined • revolutionary world • sci-fiscience fictionscience fiction fantasyshort storysocial constructionismsocial orderingsocietyspeculative fiction • uncharted land • utopia • utopian novel • what ifwomen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 MARCH 2015

The digital positions the spectacle within circulations of power and authorship

"Mid- to late-20th century theories of the spectacle take little or no account of the creation of the spectacle, because they are so preoccupied with the effects of its consumption. As Dean (2010) has observed, this made sense at a time when most images were produced in a context of 'broadcast media', but offers no way to think about what she calls the 'reflexive circuit' of social media and user-generated content (pp.108-9). As Bayne (2008) points out, 'the incursions of the digital add a mutable new dimension to decades of theorising of the visible and visual in culture' (p.395). The digital positions the spectacle within circulations of power and authorship, and needs alternative perspectives through which to theorise the spectacle for spaces where people create, appropriate and consume."

(Jen Ross, p.261)

Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Networked Learning 2012 , Edited by: Hodgson V, Jones C, de Laat M, McConnell D,. Ryberg T & Sloep P.

TAGS

20th centuryaesthetic spectacle • alternative perspectives • authorship • creation of the spectacle • Jodi Dean • power • power and authorship • reflexive circuit • reflexive foregrounding • Sian Bayne • social mediaspectacle • theorising the visible • user-generated content • visual in culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2014

NHS Innovation Diffusion: digital tools and social movements

"There is innovation inside the NHS. But innovations tend to stay local, failing to be adopted by other healthcare organisations or diffusing very slowly. This challenge is well recognised. But what's the problem? Given the assembled talents and good intentions of NHS staff, how can the systemic sum of innovation be so much less than its parts?

The NHS is sometimes described in terms of it's hierarchical structure. For my purposes it's useful to describe the current NHS using the language of philosopher–activists Deleuze & Guattari. In their terms, the NHS is a striated space marked by linear boundaries, restricted to a particular plane of activity in the space of all possible potentials[1]. For Deleuze & Guattari, like Foucault before them, power does not simply operate as a pyramid but in myriad multifaceted directions and relationships. Foucault said 'One doesn't have a power which is only in the hands of one person who exercises it alone... it is a machine in which everyone is caught, those who exercise power as much as those over whom it is exercised.. it becomes a machinery that noone owns'[2]. The overall effect is an institutional environment that acts to tame energies it is a social machine that produces conformity. As Deleuze & Guattari would say, the NHS is highly codified, where a code is a pattern of repeated acts. Of course, there are many situations where this is desirable–an ICU emergency needs a practiced response. But it doesn't make for a system that diffuses innovation.

Anyone who's returned from an innovation workshop and tried to applied new ideas in their NHS workplace has experienced this striation. It's the overlap in particular experience of all the dynamics that limit change: lack of autonomy in a hierarchical structure, the expectations of colleagues, the time it takes to deliver your daily targets, the lack of incentive, the lack of peer support, lack of sense of entitlement to change the way things are done all of which can combine to deliver an experiential straitjacket which is an impersonal affect, a pattern across the system and one that stifles diffusion as effectively as individual innovation.

The alternative is a system marked by flows, connections and zones of intensity. In the abstract terminology of Deleuze & Guattari, an innovative system would include smooth as well as striated spaces. Smooth space is occupied by intensities and events, by the continuous variation of free action. The characteristic experience of smooth space is short term, up close, with no fixed points of reference. I will try to show how the combination of social movements and digital technologies could blend smooth space with the more rigid boundaries and caste structures of the NHS in a way that aids the spread of innovation."

(Dan McQuillan, 2011)

[1] Deleuze, Gilles and Félix Guattari (1980). A Thousand Plateaus. Trans. Brian Massumi. London and New York:Continuum, 2004.
[2] Foucault, Michel (1975). Discipline and Punish: the Birth of the Prison, New York: Random House.

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2011 • a practiced response • an impersonal affect • change the way things are done • codified • conformityconnections • continuous variation • Dan McQuillan • diffusion • digital movements • digital technologiesevents • expectations of colleagues • experiential straitjacket • Felix Guattariflows • free action • Gilles Deleuze • healthcare organisations • hierarchical structure • ICU emergency • individual innovation • innovation diffusion • innovation workshop • innovative system • institutional environment • intensities • lack of autonomy • lack of incentive • limiting change • linear boundaries • local innovation • machinery • Michel Foucault • myriad multifaceted directions • myriad multifaceted relationships • NHS • no fixed points of reference • ownership • particular plane of activity • peer support • philosopher-activists • power • pyramid structure • sense of entitlement • short term • smooth spacesocial computing • social machine • social movements • spread innovation • striated space • striation • up close • zones of intensity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2014

The Fountainhead: a testament to uncompromising individualism

"The work of Rand, most of it published between the 1940s and 1960s, was very popular in the United States and gained a large and still active following. Rand developed her own school of philosophy called Objectivism, that centers on the principle of selfishness. In her novels and philosophical works, Rand advocates a form of rational and ethical egoism, and a political order based on laissezfaire capitalism. Her two novels, Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) are lengthy portrayals of strong individuals who heroically and steadfastly pursue their lives according to Rand's philosophical principles."

(P.W. Zuidhof, p.84, 2012)

Zuidhof, P. W. (2012). "Ayn Rand: Fountainhead of neoliberalism?" Krisis: Journal for contemporary philosophy(1).

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19431949American dreamarchitect • artistic vision • Atlas ShruggedAyn Rand • battle of wills • challenging conventionscollectivismcompromiseconventionalitycreative geniusdesign commissioningdesign conventions • Edward Carrere • egoegoism • ethical egoism • fear of failure • form and function • form follows function • Frank Lloyd Wrightfree willfunctionalism • Gary Cooper • Howard Roark • human actionidealism • independent-mindedness • individualism • integrity • International Styleisolated sort of geniuslaissez faire capitalismLe CorbusierLudwig Mies van der Rohemelodramamodernist architecturemodernist idealsmoral purposeneoliberalismnewspaper tycoonnon-conformistobjectivismoptimistic idealPatricia Neal • personal integrity • personal visionpowerquestioning traditionsradical architecture • rational egoism • rational self-interest • rise to power • romantic notion of the artist • rousing speech • self-interestselfishnessskyscraper • smear campaign • struggle in obscurity • The Fountainhead • uncompromising integrity • uncompromising vision • weak-mindedness • William Kueh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 DECEMBER 2013

Danah Boyd: The Future of Privacy in Social Media

"Today's youth are sharing a tremendous amount of information through social media. They share to connect, but in connecting, they leave large traces of their interactions for unexpected audiences to view. Those who care about privacy are scratching their heads, trying to make sense of why youth share and what it means for the future of privacy. danah will discuss how youth understand privacy in a networked world. She will describe youths' attitudes, practices, and strategies before discussing the implications for companies and the government."

(Danah Boyd, Microsoft Corporation, recorded 6 March 2012, duration 00:30:41.

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TAGS

2012 • being connected • cheating privacy • controlDanah Boyd • data persistence • ethnographic researcheveryday cultureFacebookfriendship networks • future of privacy • hanging outidentity constructionidentity performanceMicrosoft CorporationMySpace • network privacy • network public environment • networked publicsnetworked world • networked youth • online context • online interactionsparticipationpowerpower and agencyprivacy • privacy settings • private by default • private spacepublic by default private through effortpublic spacessearchabilitysharingsocial agencysocial groomingsocial identitysocial mediasocial networking sitessocial practicestechnology affordancestraces • understanding privacy • unexpected audiences • unstructured setting • video lecture • why youth share • young people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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