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Which clippings match 'Portrait' keyword pg.1 of 4
24 NOVEMBER 2013

Thelonious Monk: Straight, No Chaser (1988)

"Expanding on footage of Monk's 1967 tour shot by Christian Blackwood, Charlotte Zwering (Gimme Shelter) has created the definitive filmic portrait of the master bop pianist–composer. This captivating DVD digs deeper into the life of the famously eccentric pianist–composer ...

Straight, No Chaser fleshes out Monk's character considerably – from his harmonic theories to his use of quarter – tones (produced by hitting two adjacent piano keys simultaneously and occasionally even striking the boards with his entire forearm or his foot) to his mysterious relationship with his patron, baroness Nica de Koenigswarter."

(Vlatko, TopDocumentaryFilms.com)

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16mm19671988archive footageavailable light • Barry Harris • bebop • Ben Riley • black and white • Bob Jones • Bruce Ricker • Charlie Rouse • Charlotte Zwerin • Charlotte Zwering • Christian Blackwood • cinema of the streetClint Eastwood • Dick Hyman • direct cinemadissonancedocumentarydocumentary filmeccentricfilm lighting • filmic portrait • Frank Paccione • harmonic • Harry Colomby • improvised methodinfluential creators • jazz great • jazz masterjazz performancejazz pianist • Jimmy Cleveland • John Coltrane • Johnny Griffin • Juilliard School • Larry Gales • live performancelow light • Malpaso Productions • music documentary • music tour • musical genius • Nellie Monk • Nica De Koenigswarter • offbeat • Phil Woods • pianist-composer • pianoportrait • posthumous interview • Ray Copeland • recording sessionrecording studiorehearsal • Samuel Wright • sixties coolsocial realism • Straight No Chaser (1988) • Teo Macero • Thelonious Monk • Tommy Flanagan • Warner Bros

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2012

Maurizio Anzeri: embroidered patterns on found vintage photographs

"Maurizio Anzeri makes his portraits by sewing directly into found vintage photographs. His embroidered patterns garnish the figures like elaborate costumes, but also suggest a psychological aura, as if revealing the person's thoughts or feelings. The antique appearance of the photographs is often at odds with the sharp lines and silky shimmer of the threads. The combined media gives the effect of a dimension where history and future converge. The image used in Round Midnight is an early 20th century 'glamour shot' that at the time would have been considered titillating for both the girl's nudity and ethnicity. Anzeri's delicately stitched veil recasts the figure with an uncomfortable modesty, overlaying a past generation's cross–cultural anxieties with an allusion to our own.

'I've been collecting old photographs for a long time. A few years ago I was doing ink drawings with them and out of curiosity I stitched into one. I work a lot with threads and hand stitching, and the link to photography was a natural progression. I put tracing paper over the photo and draw on the face until it develops. Sometimes the image comes straight away, suggested by a detail on a dress or in the background, but with the majority of them I spend a lot of time drawing. Once the drawing is done, I pierce the photo with a set of needle–like tools I invented and take the paper away; the holes are obsessively paced at the same distance to convey an idea of geometry. When I begin the stitching something else happens, drawing will never do what thread will–the light changes, and at some points you can lose the face, and at others you can still see under it.'

'There's a dynamic in what happens between the photograph, the embroidery on top, and you standing in front looking at it. I try never to completely cover a face, you can always still see the face underneath. There are no rules other than I always leave one or both eyes open. Nothing is bigger in my head than a face, it's the best landscape we can look at. It's all to do with the centre, the body. Like a costume or other identity, my work reveals something that is behind the face that suddenly becomes in front. It's like a mask–not a mask you put on, but something that grows out of you. It's what the photo is telling you and what you want to read in the photos. I get my ideas from many different sources: it could be theatre, or someone dressed up on the tube, a tribe in Papua New Guinea, or Versace. It's never one specific thing.'

'Photographs from the 40s and 50s have a totally different quality from photos we're used to today. We don't recognise them as photographs now, they really look like watercolours or drawings. The images I use are anonymous, I find them everywhere; I'm really into flea markets and car boot sales, when you enter you have no idea what you're going to encounter. In everything I see there is something I am interested in, but I try to look at them as plain canvas. Art history is very important to me, it's all been done before but it's never been done by you: if you don't look into the past there is no chance to go into the future. The surrealist movement is important to my work, but I don't become obsessed by it, it's not dictating rules. I understand history in a formal respect, and think of past artists like travelling companions–making work is like going for a walk with them. At the end of the day it's about humanity.'"

(Saatchi Gallery)

Fig.1 Maurizio Anzeri, "Rita", 2011, Embroidery on photograph, 23.5 x 17.5 cm.

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TAGS

antique • antique appearance • art history • car boot sales • costumecraft nostalgia • cross-cultural anxieties • design craftdesign revisionism • elaborate costumes • embroidered patternsembroidery • embroidery on photograph • facefigures • flea markets • foundfound imagesgeometryglamour shot • hand stitching • inner thoughts • making art with recycled materialsmask • Maurizio Anzeri • modesty • needle • nostalgia • old photographs • overlaying • photographportrait • psychological aura • Saatchi Gallerysewing • sharp lines • silky shimmer • stitchedstitching • surrealist movement • textile arts • threads • travelling companions • veiledvintage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 APRIL 2012

The Family: warts-and-all portrait of working-class 1970s Britain

"Modelled on the 13–part observational series, An American Family (US, d. Craig Gilbert, 1972), producer Paul Watson's 12–part The Family (BBC, 1974) is credited with creating the concept of the 'fly–on–the–wall' documentary in Britain. Regardless, Watson's cinema verité–style, warts–and–all portrait of the working–class Wilkins family certainly popularised an 'observational' style still seen as the defining characteristic of British documentary some twenty–five years later.

The Family follows the daily lives of Terry and Margaret Wilkins, their children and their partners, as they all struggle to live together in a small flat in Reading. The series sets out to reveal to viewers the reality of family life in Britain as never shown before. "No TV family ever has dirty pots and pans," says Margaret in episode one, and the Wilkins demonstrate a remarkable candour in their on–camera conversations with one another.

Watson and his small crew spent two months with the Wilkins prior to filming. After this the team filmed the family eighteen hours a day for three months. The result was an extraordinary portrait of family life: honest, hilarious and painful, an instant classic the impact and influence of which (on both fiction and non–fiction television) it would be difficult to overestimate.

The Family divided critics and viewers alike, and the Wilkins were villified by the tabloid press for all manner of imagined transgressions: their 'acting' for the camera or their 'real' behaviour in front of it, their use of bad language and public airing of previously taboo subjects. Watson explained that he "wanted to make a film about the kind of people who never got on to television," and clearly the sight of a powerful and opinionated woman like Margaret Wilkins, or the challenge of daughter Heather to the casual racism of 1970s middle–England, was shocking to a certain section of the British public (Mary Whitehouse was among those who called for the series to be banned, lest this 'representative' family be seen as a model to imitate)."

(Joe Sieder, BFI Screenonline)

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1970s1974 • acting for the camera • An American FamilyBBCBritainBritish documentary • candour • casual racismcinema veritecultural signalsdirect cinemadocumentaryfamilyfamily lifefly-on-the-wallFranc Roddam • honest • Margaret Wilkins • Mary Whitehouse • non-fiction televisionobservational seriesobservational style • on-camera conversations • Paul Watsonportraitportrait of a familyportrait of family life • Reading (city) • real behaviourreality television • small flat • social changesocial classsocial constructionismsocial realitysocial stratificationsocietysocio-economictaboo subjectstelevisiontelevision documentarytelevision series • Terry Wilkins • The FamilyThe Family (television)TVUK • warts-and-all • working class

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2012

The Intimate Photograph: what does intimacy mean in visual terms?

"The goal of this class is to articulate and explore what intimacy means in visual terms. We will try and assemble a rhetorical rather than a purely emotional guide to the photograph's intimate claims. In the end, we may come to the conclusion that intimacy cannot be photographed directly (as we experience it) because, quite simply, the camera is always in the way. The trick, perhaps, is to understand intimacy as an imaginary space –– an illusion that exploits our very real longing for a profound and authentic encounter with another."

(Doug Dubois, 2010)

Fig.1 Doug Dubois (2003). "My Mother's Scar", Gloucester, Massachusetts.

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Berlin • digitalfotografie • dokumentarfotografie • Doug Dubois • facial nuanceforensic detail • foto • fotografie • fotokurs • fotokurse • intimacyintimate imageobservationphotographic portrait • photographic visual language • photographie • photographyportraitportraiturereal-lifeseeingsubtletyvisual languagewatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2012

Stanley Chow: illustrated caricatures

Fig.1 Stanley Chow "Patricia Franchini", (character played by Jean Seberg in Jean Luc Godard's "Breathless").
Fig.2 Stanley Chow "Chinese Girl", (caricature of Vladimir Tretchikoff's 1950 portrait of Monika Pon).

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2Dcaricaturecelebrityfaceflatgraphic styleillustrationJean Seberg • Monika Pon • portraitportraiture • Stanley Chow • visual communicationvisual depictionvisualisation • Vladimir Tretchikoff

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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