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Which clippings match 'Portfolio' keyword pg.1 of 3
07 FEBRUARY 2014

Advice on preparing your art and design creative portfolio

"A portfolio is a collection of your work, which shows how your skills and ideas have developed over a period of time. It demonstrates your creativity, personality, abilities and commitment, and helps us to evaluate your potential."

(University of the Arts London, 2013)

Videos include: What is a portfolio; Preparing a digital Portfolio; Preparing a portfolio; Why is a portfolio important; What should be in a portfolio; Applying to MA; Applying to BA; Applying to foundation.

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2013 • A3 • A4 • applying for art and design study • applying for BA study • art and design portfolio • art portfolio • artists journal • collection of work • colour studies • creative abilities • creative ideascreative journey • creative portfolio • creative practicecreative problem solvingcreative process journalcreativity research • design degree • design development • design inspirations • design portfoliodesign practitionerdesign workbookdocumenting design processdrawing studies • examples of research • how to make a strong portfolio • idea generationmaterials investigation • personal commitment • portfolio • portfolio assessment • portfolio of artwork • portfolio requirements • portfolio review • postgraduate portfolios • practice-based art and design course • preparing a portfolio • preparing your portfolio • reference materials • series of projects • showreelsketchblogsketchbook • sketchbook plan • sketching ideas • skills and ideas • student interview • studio diary • studying designUK • unfinished work • university applications processUniversity of the Arts London (UAL)visual diary • what is a portfolio • workbook

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2012

Pendleton Ward: on Adventure Time and being an animator

"I made this interview for http://www.adventuretime.tv and http://www.frederator.com ––– Man, I don't know what I'm sayin. To follow up on some of these ideas.. what I'm trying to do with Adventure Time is create a cartoon that kids are going to have fond memories of after they grow up.. and hopefully will be able to go back into and watch again and appreciate it a new way after they grow up. I'm tryin to make it timeless – – – like peewee's play house. With jokes that should be funny for adults and kids. When I was muttering about "real characters" What I mean is.. when I was a kid.. I cared about cartoon characters. I cared about Lisa Simpson when she loved her substitute teacher and how she felt when he left town on that train.. I cared about Doug Funny when he was nervous around Patty Mayonnaise. Even Beavis and Butthead had real moments.. when Butthead choked on that chicken.. it was real.. it wasn't.. cartoony.. but it was still funny. So I'm into that idea. Not that my characters are overly sensitive like Doug or Lisa.. I'm not trying to re–create those emotions. But just find out how Finn and Jake would react to the situations they are in and then play them real. Finn is turning into a little spitfire actually.. and Jake is Bill Murray and The Dude from The Big Lebowski.

The show is turning out really good I think. There are a lot of amazing people working on it. Thanks for staying interested and watching this video."

(Pendleton Ward)

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Adventure Time • animationanimator • Beavis and Butthead • Bill Murray • Bueno the Bear • cartooncartoon characters • cartoony • design portfolio • Doug Funny • drumsdungeons and dragons • Finn • Jake • Lisa Simpson • Patty Mayonnaise • Pendleton Ward • portfolio • real characters • spitfire • The Big Lebowski • visual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JANUARY 2011

Computer Arts: 20 tips for getting your dream design job

"You know the studio, you've followed its work, and now you're ready to get your portfolio through the door. Industry leaders give advice on how to get your mug on that desk

It's a simple fact that there are more designers than there are jobs in design. Every year, a new wave of hopefuls emerges from colleges around the country to ensure the situation will only become more difficult. There's some good news, though. Anecdotal evidence from the desks of creative directors around the world suggests that only 20 per cent of the applications they see are worth considering.

This is bad news for employers, as they have a lot of sifting to do, but for any designer worth his or her salt it considerably narrows the field. You are, in effect, only competing with the rest of that 20 per cent. The trick is to ensure you don't get lost in the creative tsunami caused by the other 80–and that's what the wisdom collected here is intended to ensure. Creative directors, specialist recruitment agencies, advertising giants–the people you're trying to reach–explain how to go about reaching them."

(Computer Arts)

Fig.1 http://www.jonathanyuen.com

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 DECEMBER 2010

E-learning 2.0: content is used rather than read and resembles language or conversation rather than a book or a manual

"What happens when online learning software ceases to be a type of content–consumption tool, where learning is 'delivered,' and becomes more like a content–authoring tool, where learning is created? The model of e–learning as being a type of content, produced by publishers, organized and structured into courses, and consumed by students, is turned on its head. Insofar as there is content, it is used rather than read– and is, in any case, more likely to be produced by students than courseware authors. And insofar as there is structure, it is more likely to resemble a language or a conversation rather than a book or a manual.

The e–learning application, therefore, begins to look very much like a blogging tool. It represents one node in a web of content, connected to other nodes and content creation services used by other students. It becomes, not an institutional or corporate application, but a personal learning center, where content is reused and remixed according to the student's own needs and interests. It becomes, indeed, not a single application, but a collection of interoperating applications–an environment rather than a system.

It also begins to look like a personal portfolio tool. The idea here is that students will have their own personal place to create and showcase their own work. Some e–portfolio applications, such as ELGG, have already been created. IMS Global as put together an e–portfolio specification. 'The portfolio can provide an opportunity to demonstrate one's ability to collect, organize, interpret and reflect on documents and sources of information. It is also a tool for continuing professional development, encouraging individuals to take responsibility for and demonstrate the results of their own learning'."

(Stephen Downes, 17 October 2005)

Fig.1 Andrey Nepomnyaschev, 'Six Seconds', LooksLikeGoodDesign.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JULY 2010

Portfolio for Video Game Environment Artist Philip Howlett

"The Second City is a 1930's Chicago inspired street scene. This was created for a client who was looking for a proof of concept, with a view to presenting it to games publishers. All assets were modelled and textured by myself, from an extensive catalogue of reference photography. ...

This is a fly–through video recorded in Fraps straight from the UDK viewpoint. Breakdowns of meshes and lighting can be seen. Thanks to Robert Antill for the work he did in After Effects on this."

(Philip Howlett)

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1930s3DAfter EffectsanimationChicagocreative practicedesign portfoliodesignerenvironment • environment artist • fly-through • Fraps • gamegraphic representationmodellingMultimedia 3rd yearmultimedia graduateNTUNTU Multimedia • Philip Howlett • portfolioproof of conceptRob Antillspatial design • street scene • texturing • The Second City • UDK viewpoint • video gamevirtual environmentsvisual communicationvisual designvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Multimedia
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