Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Pornography' keyword pg.1 of 2
18 SEPTEMBER 2013

Is porno-chic the new black?

"Currently there is a three–year research project going on at The University of Auckland to examine the broader effects of pornography on New Zealand society. Pornography has always been with us you could argue, so why the fuss now? One reason is the growth of the internet. Pornographic imagery is just a click away. Gonzo porn, where there is aggression directed at women, is the growth area in this multi–billion dollar industry. Question its prevalence, and you run the risk of being considered a prude in today's climate of liberal tolerance–very uncool.

It's supposed to be empowering for women to be sexual in their behaviour and dress. We are sold 'technologies of sexiness' wrapped up in the rhetoric of individual consumer choice. To be 'hot' is the aim of every pimply tween, male or female, and that means trying to refashion yourself into a porn body. Desperate effort goes into maintaining sexual currency as age takes its toll."

(Linda Tyler, 8th Sep 2013, NZ Fashion Museum blog)

1

TAGS

aggression directed towards women • Anna Jagodzinska • Anna Selezneva • Calvin Klein • Carson Parker • cool • Cosmopolitan (magazine) • Crystal Renn • Danny Schwarz • degrading behaviour • demeaningdepictions of women • Dolce and Gabbana • Domenico Dolce • Duncan Quinn • Edita Vilkeviciute • erotic scenes • eroticizing violence • fashion advertising • fashion culture • fashion modelfashion photography • FCUK • female consumer • French Connection UK • gang rape • glamourising violence • gonzo porn • group sex • Helen Gurley Brown • high fashion • Jimmy Choo • Karolina Kurkova • Lara Stone • liberal tolerance • mainstream imagery • maltreatment • Mario Sorrenti • mens fashion • Mikus Lasmanis • Natasha Poly • New Zealand Fashion Museum • normalising violence • partially unclothedPlayboy (magazine)plaything • porn body • pornification of visual culture • pornoporno-chicpornographic imagespornographicationpornography • prude • public spaceQuincy Jonesrape • refashion yourself • sadomasochistic sexsex objectsex sellssexual agencysexual behaviour • sexual currency • sexual depictions • sexual game • sexualised depictions • sexualised violence • Stephano Gabbana • Steven Klein • Steven Meisel • suggestive narratives • technologies of sexiness • Tom Ford • uncool • University of Auckland • V Magazine • violence against women • violence directed towards women • visual communication • Vladimir Ivanov • Vogue Magazine • womens fashion • young women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2012

Peggy Orenstein on our gender performance culture

"Peggy Orenstein ('Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie–Girl Culture') and Kaveri Subrahmanyam ('Digital Youth: The Role of Media in Development') had a conversation about girl culture and digital media for Googlers in Santa Monica on February 9, 2011. They were joined by Adriana Manago, who works with Kaveri at the Children's Digital Media Center (UCLA/CSULA)."
(About @Google Talks, 9 February 2011)

Fig.1 Kaveri Subrahmanyam talks to Peggy Orenstein about "Cinderella Ate My Daughter", About @Google Talks [18:24]

1

TAGS

Adriana Manago • Barbie Fashion Designer • boredomboys • bullying • chat roomCinderella • Cinderella Ate My Daughter • culture of prettydesiredigital mediadigital youthdoll playempowermentFacebookfeminismgendergender performance culture • girlhood • girlsGoogle Inc • Google Talks • identity • identity development • Kaveri Subrahmanyam • Lord and Taylor • market segmentationmedia literacy • media researcher • new medianew technology • nursery colours • overcoding • parent • Peggy Orenstein • performance cultureperformativitypinkpink and prettyplaying with dolls • popular zeitgeist • pornographyprettysextingsexual agencysexualisationsexualitysocial mediasocialisation • Tyler Clementi • young girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2011

The adult business fuels a lot of mainstream technology growth

Jason Tucker: "the mainstream has learned a lot from the adult business. The adult business fuels a lot of the growth of technology that exists on the internet. From streaming video, from content delivery vehicles, from content delivering networks, dealing with bottlenecks on the internet because there are so many people going to a specific ite, distributing that around. From that it's now...and then also the basic business models, the how to transact, the per click, the per impression, the upsell concept. That all came from the adult business."

(Robin Benger, 2009)

Extract transcript from extended interview with Jason Tucker (CEO Falcon Enterprises) and video interview from: Robin Benger (2009). "Porndemic", Cogent/Benger Productions.

1

TAGS

2009 • adult business • adult company • Adult FriendFinder • BitTorrentbusiness modelcontent deliveryDigital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) • digital sexual experience • disruptive innovation • electronic pornography • erotic library • Falcon Enterprises • image identificationimage library • internet generation • Internet porn • Jason Tucker • killing time content • Larry Flynt • mainstream • marketplacemovie businessownership • pay site • pay-per-click • pay-per-impression • pay-per-view • Penthouse (magazine) • picture gallery • Playboy (magazine) • porn industry • porn library • Porndemic (2009) • pornographyre-publish • Robin Benger • sex industry • stealing content • Steve Hirsch • streaming videotelevision documentary • tube sites • upselling • vertical market • video gallery • video on demand • Vivid Entertainment Group • Wicked Pictures

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2011

Returning to Michael Powell's Peeping Tom after 15 years

"Peeping Tom has been widely celebrated as one of the great films about looking, about consumption, about cinema, about art, about the artist, about the relation between the artist, the artwork and the audience, about the relation between looking and pleasure, looking and desire, looking and death, and so on. All very familiar stuff from Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis and film studies (the film's tailor–made for film studies – bring in some Freud here, some Bataille and de Sade there, add a little Lacan and Virillio, etc). The aggressive and violating camera, as Scorsese put it. And this is partly the problem with Peeping Tom. Like the films of Peter Greenaway or David Cronenberg, Peeping Tom is more like an academic essay about voyeurism and scopophilia, a join–the–dots lecture on the pleasures, risks and dangers of art. Plus, Peeping Tom employs the most stereotypical, cliched thriller/ murder mystery plot you can imagine: a young man, a loner, a misfit, introspective, morbid, an outsider figure, abused as a child, etc etc etc, who murders sexualized women (prostitutes and actresses), and is befriended by an innocent he cannot bring himself to corrupt or kill.

Powell attacks the subject of voyeurism and murder aggressively in the opening scenes: the close–ups on cameras, projectors and eyes, the mirrors and reflections, exaggerated sounds (the rattle of a projector, a dripping tap, a heartbeat, whispered voiceover), and his love of visual rhymes and puns (eyes, drinks, sticks and tripods). You can see Powell having a ball in orchestrating his elaborate camera moves, his erotic, sleazy mise–en–abyme, his film–within–a–film tropes (Powell playing the murderer's father and torturer in home movies which he shot himself), the multiple reflections, mirrors, lenses, cameras, projections and screens (every shot in Peeping Tom seems to have been lit by a raking, unfiltered, unflattering horizontal light). It's not that Powell isn't at the top of his game in Peeping Tom – in its way, Peeping Tom is every bit as inventive as Powell's best work – it's that the plot, the characters, the situations are so cheesy, predictable, and shallow.

Despite all this, though, Peeping Tom does have bite and a nastiness which age hasn't dimmed. Peeping Tom also still feels 'contemporary' in its psychoanalytic treatment of a serial killer plot which draws on prostitution, cinema, acting, and pornography. And the conceit of having a murder in the opening shots which's replayed a moment later over the credits is a tour–de–force (one of the film's best cinematic ideas, this says everything necessary, and economically, in the first five minutes)."

(Jeremy Robinson)

1
2

TAGS

1960abuseaggressionartartistartworkaudienceBritish directorBritish film directorcameracinemaclicheclose-upconsumptionDavid Cronenbergdeathdesire • Emeric Pressburger • erotic • essayfilmfilm studies • film-within-a-film • Freudian • Georges Bataille • innocenceintrospectionJacques Lacan • join-the-dots • Leo Marks • loner • looking • Marquis de Sade • Martin ScorseseMichael Powellmirrormise-en-abymemisfitmorbidmurdermurder mysteryoutsider • Paul Virilio • Peeping Tom (film) • Peter Greenawaypleasurepornographyprojectorprostitutionpsychoanalysis • pun • reflectionscopophilia • scoptophilia • serial killer • sexualised • sleazy • stereotypethrillerUKviolation • visual rhyme • voyeurism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MARCH 2009

Women or androids?

"Oh, Playboy, why do you want your 'readers' to lust after androids? That's the only explanation we can think of for the proportions of your lovely ladybots. We culled the stats for every centerfold from December 1953 (Marilyn Monroe) to January 2009 (Dasha Astafieva), then calculated each woman's body–mass index.

A clear trend emerged: While real American women have steadily eaten their way up the BMI slope – just like American men – Playmates have gone from a sylphlike 19.4 to an anime–ideal 17.6."

(Katharine Gammon, 19.02.09)

1

TAGS

19641986androidbeauty • belle curves • BMI • bodybody image • body-mass index • centerfold • cheesecakeclassical beautycultural norms • Dasha Astafieva • fashionfemale formfemininitygendergender politics • glamour model • glamour photography • glamour shotideal female bodyideal form • infoporn • ladybot • Laurie Carr • Marilyn Monroephysical archetypepin-upPlayboy (magazine) • playmate • pornographyproportions • Rosemarie Hillcrest • Wired (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.